Feeds:
Posts
Comments

As you probably know, Dove chocolates come wrapped in foil with uplifting statements written inside. Not long ago I found this one:

“The more you praise and celebrate your life,

the more there is in life to celebrate.”

A positive attitude of praise and celebration, even for the little blessings, does contribute to a sense of well-being. But there’s an important omission in this quote—the cause of all those blessings.  Perhaps the sentiment should read:

“The more you praise and celebrate God in your life,

the more there is in life to celebrate.”

Now a pleasing sentiment has become solid truth, because with God in our lives, joy is our constant companion.

It requires such a small effort, really—to note the supreme pleasures in ordinary events or to choose a positive perspective.

Sometimes joy involves making a magnificent moment . . .

I’d been mall shopping for several hours, scouring the sales racks to no avail. Suddenly I noticed my sweater—one of my favorites–was no longer tied to my purse. 

Not only had I not purchased an addition for my wardrobe that afternoon, I’d subtracted a piece of clothing already owned.

Retracing my steps seemed daunting; I had browsed in so many stores.  Besides, it was time to meet Steve for dinner at one of the mall restaurants.  

After we ordered our meals, I told him what happened. “I’ll check the lost-and-found after we eat,” I said. “By then maybe someone will have found my sweater and turned it in.”

So that’s what we did.  No sweater.

Steve suggested we stop at the stores where I’d shopped as we made our way back to the car.

At the very first store the eyes of the young sales girl lit up when I asked about a lost sweater. “What color was it?” she asked.

“Cranberry red.”

“We did find it! It’s right back here!” she replied while heading to the rear of the store. Sure enough, the young woman returned with my sweater. Someone had even put it on a hanger.

Well! I thanked her and the manager behind the counter, not knowing which had found it and been so thoughtful.

One of them jokingly said something about doing good deeds for chocolate.

As it happened, just two doors down was the Godiva Chocolate Shop. Before leaving the mall, Steve and I popped in, bought two little boxes, and went back to the clothing store.

When those two girls saw the Godiva bag they whooped in surprise and started to laugh. We did too.

“God blessed me through you by returning my sweater; we wanted to bless you,” I told them.

“Oh! That remark about chocolate was just a joke!” the salesgirl cried. “But you have no idea how much I needed this. Today has been especially rough.” She started around the counter with her arms outstretched. “Come here! I need to give you a hug!”  Then she added, “Look!  I’m crying!”

I had tears in my eyes as well.

The level of endorphins in that shop soared so high the lights shone brighter and the atmosphere crackled with joy.  And all because Steve and I magnified the significance of a small moment and celebrated a God-orchestrated event.

Truly, “The more you praise and celebrate God in your life, the more there is in life to celebrate.”

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

What are you celebrating in life today?  Magnify the moment by sharing your joy in the comments below!

Art & photo credits: http://www.flickr.com; http://www.publicdomainpictures.net; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.canva.com.

(Revised and reblogged from April 23, 2015.)

We’re now six weeks and five days into spring, and evidence of the season abounds:

  • Greenery flourishes from ground cover to tree tops
  • Lilac, lily of the valley, and hyacinth scent the air
  • Birds perform arias of warbles and trills
  • Butterflies bob from flower to leaf
  • Warm breezes dance through the trees

Most of us revel in these signs of spring.  We find our senses highly engaged, taking in each stage of the transformation. Perhaps that explains why many people experience more joy this time of year. 

I wonder:  what if we engaged our five senses in worship and quiet time with God?  Might some of that springtime joy well up in our spirits—all year long?

Christian psychologist, author, and teacher David Benner would have us understand:

The senses are a doorway to the sacred.

The question becomes:  how might these organs help us connect with God more profoundly?

Here are a few sacred sensory activities to get us started.

Sight

Gaze upon the beauty of the Lord while meditating on his attributes, his works, and wonders (Psalm 27:4).  Record the resulting thoughts on a journal page and increase the impact of reflection.

Revel in the glories of nature and write a page of praise, acclaiming God for his creative genius and impeccable workmanship.

Sound

 Play or listen to worshipful music.

Where words fail, music speaks.

Hans Christian Anderson

Or, listen in silence.

Silence is not an absence of sound

but rather a shifting of attention

toward sounds that speak to the soul.

Thomas Moore

Again, keep a journal and pen at hand to write the thoughts and impressions God speaks into your heart as you listen.

Smell

Begin quiet time by lighting a scented candle.  Perhaps reserve a favorite fragrance for this sacred time of day.  As the aroma fills the air, remember that God is with you, surrounding you with his Presence.

Taste

For many of us a mug of coffee or tea sits alongside our Bibles and journals.  What if we recited Psalm 34:8 as we take that first sip?

Praise God for his goodness; thank him for his blessings. Record one or two of his gifts in a gratitude journal. 

The more we focus on him and his wonderful works, the better we can taste his goodness.  So delight in the sweetness of his unfailing love.  Savor the hearty flavor of his strength.  Satisfy the hunger of your heart with the joy and peace of his presence.*

Touch

Years ago in a class on prayer we participants were instructed to put our hands in our laps, palms up.  After a few silent moments I suddenly felt a tingling sensation.  Was the Spirit of God holding my hands as we prepared to pray?

The professor explained that the pressure on the backs of our hands was causing the phenomenon.  But wasn’t it wonderful to imagine God gracing each of us with his personal touch?  Oh yes!

That evening began a life-long habit of turning my palms upward to pray, to avail myself more fully to the nearness of God.  It’s a divine way to augment worship.

Harold Best believes:

“Of all people, Christians should have the best noses,

the best eyes and ears,

the most open joy, the widest sense of delight.”

As we engage our senses in worship, we will find ourselves ushered through the doorway to the sacred and into the presence of our magnificent and beautiful God.

Do you incorporate any sacred sensory activities into your quiet times with God? Please tell us about it in the comment section below!

*Sarah Young, Jesus Always, Thomas Nelson, 2004, p. 333.

Photo credits: http://www.pxhere.com; ww.flickr.com; http://www.decaturdaily.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.hippopx.com; http://www.pixnio.com; http://www.flickr.com.

A Spring Celebration

Since 1996 spring has become associated with poetry. That’s the year the Academy of American Poets established April as National Poetry Month.

This season does lend itself to getting creative with words. So before we turn the calendar page to May, let’s celebrate spring–with poetry.

To begin, allow Ralph Waldo Emerson to inspire:

In addition to those grand changes around us, we often find delight in minute pleasures as well.  The following cinquain resulted from a small moment at our nearby nature center.

Beetle,

dotted and domed,

Pausing, watching, preparing

To fly away on hidden wings.

Lady bug

Delight is found in humor also.  God had fun with us Midwesterners last week, supplying a day of outlandish weather.  To celebrate I tackled a poetry form called nonet (non’-et):  nine lines starting with nine syllables in the first and descending in number until the last line only includes one syllable.

April 21, 2021

Sun and Snow engaged in tug-of-war.

At dawn, Snow controlled the landscape,

Cloaking every blade and branch.

But Sun fought valiantly

And gained back her ground,

However, Snow

returned!  Yet . . .

. . . spring Sun

Won!

Sun and balmy breezes of April send many out to their gardens, preparing for May planting while dreaming of what’s to come:

Come fall however, our gardens will fade to pale stems and dried petals.   “The grass withers and the flowers fall,” wrote the prophet Isaiah (40:8a).  “But,” he added,  “the word of our God endures forever” (v. 8b).

In celebration of the eternal spring of God’s Word, I experimented with the pantoum form—a poem that includes four-line stanzas in which the second and fourth lines of each become the first and third lines of the next.  The last line of the poem is often the same as the first.

Growing in God’s Word

Thank you, Father, for the delights of scripture!

Your Word refreshes my soul.

Your promises produce security, hope, and comfort.

Your truth sows wisdom, encouragement, and strength.

Your Word refreshes my soul.

Understanding develops contentment.

Your truth sows wisdom, encouragement, and strength,

And diligent study causes my spirit to flourish.

Understanding develops contentment.

Your Word abounds with wonderful things,

And diligent study causes my spirit to flourish.

Thank you, Father, for the delights of scripture!*

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

I praise you O God for Spring, its delights of birth and life that feed our souls.  I praise you also for your Word, its delights and depths that provide the nutrients for a fulfilling spiritual life.  May I send my roots deep into your truths.

*Psalm 119:24; 28 AMP; Ephesians 1:13; Psalm 119:14; 50 NLT; 19:7; 119:28 NLT & NIV; Proverbs 19:23; 119:15-16; 119:18

Photo credits: http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.hippopx.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.canva.com; http://www.pxhere.com.

The internet offers plenty of advice for maximizing time and effort in order to achieve success. The suggestions include:

  • Prioritize and protect your agenda.  Identify the crucial tasks for each day and focus on those items first.  Limit interruptions; shut down distractions.
  • Build an efficient routine into your schedule to streamline how time is allocated.
  • Pursue your own goals; don’t let others set them for you.
  • Network—especially with influential people who can expedite your success.

Jesus failed to follow any of that advice.

Instead:

His agenda shifted often, and he allowed frequent interruptions.

People interrupted his teaching and traveling all the time with requests for miracles.  Jewish leaders interjected questions while he was speaking.  When he tried to take the disciples to a quiet place for rest, the crowds followed, eager to hear him preach. 

And out of compassion, Jesus complied. [1]

Sometimes even his interruptions were interrupted.

While answering a question of John the Baptist’s disciples one day, a ruler intruded upon the conversation, begging him to come and raise his daughter from the dead.  En route to the ruler’s house, another interruption occurred when a woman touched his robe in hope of healing.[2]

It’s a wonder he ever arrived at his intended destinations.

Jesus had no routine.

Scripture seems to indicate Jesus lived in the moment—teaching, building relationships, healing, and performing miracles as opportunities presented themselves.

However, Christ did make time for important habits, including seclusion, prayer, and worship.[3]

Jesus’ overarching goal in life was to accomplish his Father’s goal.

“For I have come down from heaven

not to do my will but to do

the will of him who sent me.”

–John 6:38

Jesus set his sights on the joy awaiting him, when all earthly pain, frustration, and humiliation would be over and he’d be seated at the right side of his Father’s throne.[4]

Jesus built relationships, not a network.

At the end of three years, he’d assembled 120 followers.[5]  That’s an average of 40 per year; less than one per week.  Not very impressive.

Yet Jesus was the most successful Person who ever lived because:

True success is excellent living—

when a person’s thoughts, decisions,

and actions honor God.

–Chrystal Evans Hurst[6]

And Christ accomplished that perfectly.  

Now, thousands of angels encircle his throne, giving Jesus praise, honor, and glory because of his triumph over sin and death.[7]

What about us?  Are we focused on the culture’s view of success or God’s? 

Do we accept—even celebrate—what he chooses to do through us and then leave the results to him?

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Lord God, help me to be a failure like Jesus! I confess that worldly standards of success cloud my vision of what true excellence entails:  obedience to you. Remind me you know what you’re doing and you do all things well; circumstances are not reliable indicators.  I reaffirm my trust in you whose works are always perfect.

(Jeremiah 7:23; Proverbs 19:21; Deuteronomy 32:4)


[1] Matthew 9:18-19; 21:23-24; 20:29-34; Mark 6:30-34

[2] Matthew 9:14-26

[3] Mark 1:35; Luke 4:16

[4] Hebrews 12:2

[5] Acts 1:15

[6] Kingdom Woman Devotional, Tyndale House Publishers (2013), p. 49.

[7] Revelation 5

Art & photo credits: http://www.pixabay.com (2); http://www.freebibleimages.org (2); http://www.canva.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.canva.com.

Give Me Jesus

One day a neighbor of Fanny Crosby complained, “If I had wealth I would be able to do just what I wish to do, and I would be able to make an impression in the world.”

Some might have expected Fanny to reply, “At least you have eyes that can see.”

Fanny had been blind since the age of two months. Few would blame her for reminding the dissatisfied neighbor that his lack did not begin to compare with her own.

But Fanny answered instead, “Well, take the world, but give me Jesus” (1).

(Fanny Crosby)

Why would Fanny respond like that?  She provided part of the answer in the hymn she wrote, inspired by the above encounter.  The title:  Give Me Jesus (1878).

Her reasons mentioned included his everlasting love, watchful care, deep mercy, and redemption for our sins.

Fanny’s 8000+ hymns and choruses celebrate numerous other reasons, as you can imagine.

If I ever wrote a hymn, the lyrics might include such blessings as these:

With Jesus,

Every need is provided,

Every promise fulfilled,

Every delight enhanced (2).

With Jesus,

Every sin is forgiven,

Every shame erased,

Every grace applied (3).

With Jesus,

Every worry is calmed,

Every fear assuaged,

Every prayer answered (4).

With Jesus,

Every decision is guided,

Every step ordered,

Every circumstance controlled (5).

With Jesus,

Every moment is lovingly attended,

Every necessary truth revealed,

Every God-given task empowered (6).

To view these gifts altogether is like gazing into an overflowing treasure chest.  We find the impact of each blessing magnified, the splendor augmented, the wonder increased by the sheer number of gifts.

And wonder ushers us into worship.

We praise you, O holy God!  You are completely separate from all else in the universe.  No one is your equal in power, wisdom, splendor, and love—all manifested in the glorious work you do in us and for us.

Thank you, Giver of all good gifts, for every kindness mentioned above and more.

With Fanny each of us can say:


Of course this post includes only a partial list of the blessings we experience with Jesus. What would you add? Please share in the comment section below!

Notes:

1. https://wordwisehymns.com/2011/12/16/take-the-world-but-give-me-jesus-2/

2. Philippians 4:19; Psalm 145:13b; Psalm 16:11

3. 1 John 1:9; Isaiah 43:25; John 1:16 ESV

4. Philippians 4:6-7; Psalm 23:4; 1 John 5:14-15

5. Psalm 32:8; Psalm 37:23 NLT; Psalm 103:19

6. Psalm 23:4; John 8:32; Philippians 2:13

Art & photo credits: http://www.worldwidehymns.com; http://www.canva.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.canva.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.canva.com (2).

Stars of Heaven

On January 25, 1905, diamond mine superintendent Frederick Wells inspected the walls of the Premier Diamond Mine in South Africa—as usual.  Suddenly his practiced eye caught a telltale glimmer in the rock.  

Workmen cut free the luminous stone that very day, then took it to be weighed in the office of mine owner Thomas Cullinan.

The miners knew the fist-sized gem was a stellar find, but no one expected what the scale revealed.  Before them lay the largest diamond ever found—3,106 carats worth, and a perfectly clear specimen except for one black spot in the middle.

Frederick Wells with the Cullinan Diamond

Named for the mine owner, the Cullinan Diamond was sold to the Transvaal provincial government and eventually presented as a birthday present to England’s King Edward VII in 1907. 

King Edward hired master-lapidary I. J. Asscher of Amsterdam to divide the stone.  Asscher studied the Cullinan for six months before making the first cut, and subsequently created nine major stones along with ninety-six smaller ones.

Opened in 1854; still in business.

The largest diamond is called the “Star of Africa I” or “Cullinan I” and sits atop the British royal scepter; Star of Africa II is part of the Imperial State Crown.[1]

Star of Africa I is the pear-shaped embellishment atop the scepter.
Star of Africa II, front and center of the crown, just above the band of ermine.

Why did God create diamonds?  For the same reason he created everything in the universe:  to display his glory.[2]

Diamonds offer a magnificent example of God’s creative power, as he applied heat and pressure to simple black carbon and created mesmerizing stones.

Of course, it takes tremendous pressure (50,000 times more than that at the earth’s surface) and severe heat (2000 degrees Farenheit) for the transformation to take place.  Such extreme conditions only occur deep in the ground—at least 90 miles below the surface.

Humans have only been able to drill a little over seven miles into the earth.  So how were diamonds even discovered?  Because of another spectacular display of God’s power:  volcanoes, which spew them up to the surface.

And though raw diamonds do glimmer, their full magnificence is not released until the lapidary cuts the stones on all sides, to maximize the refraction and reflection of light. Today’s popular brilliant cut requires 58 facets. The process takes up to two weeks.

The ancient Greeks believed that a diamond was a chip of star that had fallen to earth.  We smile at their naiveté until we learn astronomers discovered a star in 2009 that has cooled and compressed into a massive diamond—10 billion trillion trillion carats worth!

Imagine the smile on God’s face as the scientists proved lyricist Jane Taylor closer to truth than she knew: “Twinkle, twinkle, little star . . . like a diamond in the sky” (1806).

With Job, we can affirm:

In addition to displaying God’s glory, diamonds also provide valuable lessons—much as he’s used trees, sheep, and ants to teach us.[3]  At least two lessons have been encapsulated in memorable quotes. 

Lesson #1: 

You know what else makes God smile?  Transforming black-carbon lives into radiant diamond-people.  Think of those like Kirk Cameron, George W. Bush, and Franklin Graham, all of whom once lived in dark rebellion and now reflect the light of Christ.

Such transformations require a lengthy process, and most often the heat and pressure of difficult circumstances, but the results are quite spectacular.[4]

Lesson #2:

    

A lapidary reminds us of our Heavenly Father.  He chips away at our self-centeredness and pride until we’re Stars of Heaven, fit for his crown and radiating his glory in brilliant perfection.[5]

So, my fellow stars-in-process, “let faith and patience have their perfect work, for in the day when the crown will be set on the head of the King Eternal, Immortal, Invisible, one ray of glory will stream from you”—Charles Spurgeon.


Notes

[1] https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/worlds-largest-diamond-found# and https://www.capetowndiamondmuseum.org/blog/2017/01/worlds-largest-diamond-the-cullinan/

[2] Psalm 19:1

[3] Jeremiah 17:7-8; Psalm 23; Proverbs 6:6-8

[4] Hebrews 12:5-11

[5] Zechariah 9:16; 2 Corinthians 3:18

Photo images: http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.flickr.com (2); http://www.wikipedia.org; http://www.canva.com (2); http://www.wikimedia.org.

Most of us have asked at one time or another, “Why does God allow so much suffering?  Why doesn’t he intervene?” 

Surprisingly, people of the Third World where suffering is common don’t ask these questions.  They accept the fact that no one leaves this life without enduring times of trial and distress [1].

Even God’s own Son endured suffering. Unimaginable suffering.  And it didn’t begin with the physical torture inflicted by Roman soldiers or the horrific crucifixion sanctioned by Pilate.

It began the night before, in the garden of Gethsemane, as he experienced overwhelming desperation and sorrow, and his sweat fell like drops of blood [2].

BUT!  God Almighty takes the worst deeds of man that cause the greatest pain and turns them into glorious victory with eternal benefits.

As we wait for that day, God uses our suffering to fulfill higher purpose beyond our comfort and prosperity—purposes such as these:

God doesn’t intervene so we can learn to surrender and obey.

Even Jesus “learned obedience from what he suffered” [3]—poverty, hunger, temptation, pain, exhaustion, derision, and stress.  Anything we face, he faced.

God knows if we don’t learn to surrender to his ways and purposes, we end up living to please ourselves—and not liking the selves we’ve pleased.

On the other hand, obedience does lead to confidence in God, prosperity of soul, and the ability to face life with resilience and poise.

God doesn’t intervene so we can develop character.

Suffering works for the believer, not against, producing perseverance which leads to character; and character to hope [ 4].

So we strive to act wisely and in the process learn self-control.  We withstand discomfort and learn fortitude.  We endure self-sacrifice and learn how to love.

God doesn’t pour the rains of affliction upon our souls for nothing.  “Springing up beneath the pounding rain are spiritual flowers.  And they are more beautiful and fragrant than those that ever grew before in your stormless and suffering-free life” [5].

God doesn’t intervene so we can inspire others.

Some of you may know the name Bill Sweeney, a popular blogger diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease in 1996.  He graduated to heaven just after Christmas 2021. 

Bill outlived many others with the same diagnosis, but he suffered much.  For years his entire body was immobile.  Eventually Bill was composing his posts on a computer that tracked eye movements—posts that reflected deep faith, great strength of spirit, and delightful humor.

Commenters affirmed again and again Bill’s impact in their lives as he provided stellar encouragement and inspiration, all the more impactful because of his deteriorated health.

God doesn’t intervene so we can exhibit faith.

Bill Sweeney exhibited great faith even though he was incapable of anything beyond typing with eye movements.  But it wasn’t the suffering itself that produced spiritual strength.  It was his response.  Without self-pity he lived his life and shared his heart—humbly and honestly. And thousands of people found hope.

It’s important to understand: Christ did not suffer to exclude us from suffering; he suffered to exclude us from the consequences of our sins.  However, we can be confident of this:

That means Bill Sweeney’s sacrifice of suffering counts for all eternity.

And God will make your sacrifices of suffering count for all eternity too [6].


[1] Philip Yancey, Grace Notes, p. 69.

[2] Luke 22:44; Mark 14:34-36

[3] Hebrews 5:8

[4] Romans 5:3-4

[5] L. B. Cowman, Jim Reimann, ed., Streams in the Desert, June 15.

[6] F. Elaine Olsen, Beyond the Scars, p. 163.

Photo credits: http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.hippopx.com; http://www.canva.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.canva.com; http://www.dailyverses.net.

(In honor of Women’s History Month)

 

Hannah More (1745-1833)

 

The odds were stacked against her.

Like all young women of eighteenth century Britain, Hannah More would have to choose between marriage and a select few occupations for females. Universities did not accept women, most professions were closed to them, they couldn’t serve in government or even vote.

Yet the case has been made that Hannah More wielded strong influence in important arenas of her time. How could that be? God paved the way.

 

 

First, he gave Hannah a quick mind and a schoolteacher father who taught his five daughters at home. As the girls grew into womanhood Mr. More helped two of the older sisters open a boarding school for girls in nearby Bristol. Hannah attended for a while, but at age eighteen, became one of the teachers.

In addition to the ability to teach, God gave Hannah a gift for writing. Even at an early age she was composing poems and essays. Later she began to write plays for her students—dramas that included life lessons.

In her early twenties, Hannah became engaged to neighboring landowner, William Turner. Three times the wedding date was set; three times he backed out. The third time Hannah broke the engagement. To assuage his guilt, William gave her a monthly stipend, enabling Hannah to move to London and focus on her writing.

 

(www.azquotes.com/author/10363-Hannah_More)

 

God also provided opportunities for Hannah to meet people of influence. With her intelligence, wit, and charm, she was often invited to dinner parties and became a member of high society.

Meanwhile she made the acquaintance of John Newton, the slave-ship captain turned preacher who wrote Amazing Grace. They enjoyed a life-long friendship.

 

 

Newton was a member of the Clapham Sect, a group of passionate Christians, eager to release people from the oppression of poverty and slavery. One of the sect members served in Parliament, William Wilberforce. He, his wife Barbara, and Hannah also became friends for life.

 

     

William and Barbara Wilberforce

 

Hannah already despised the slave trade and joined the Clapham community. Their strong commitment to Christ greatly influenced Hannah and the practice of her faith took on greater importance.

At the suggestion of Wilburforce, Hannah wrote a poem to raise awareness about the treatment of slaves. It was published in 1788. One passage described the capture of Africans:

 

The burning village, and the blazing town:

See the dire victim torn from social life,

See the sacred infant, hear the shrieking wife!

She, wretch forlorn! Is dragged by hostile hands,

To distant tyrants sold, in distant lands.

 

As a result of reading Hannah’s impassioned account, thousands of people signed petitions demanding an end to the slave trade. The next year, Wilburforce used her poem in a Parliamentary debate concerning slavery.

Hannah helped the cause in other ways also. She encouraged a sugar boycott, since slaves provided the workforce on the British plantations of the Caribbean.

 

 

She even used her influence at dinner parties. Among people dressed in finery and focused on pleasure, Hannah would engage in cheerful banter, then pull out a folded piece of paper from her reticule, a drawstring purse.

“Have you ever seen the likes of this?” she might ask while spreading a print flat on the dining table—a diagram of the cargo hold inside a slave ship with Africans packed tightly together. The startling image helped garner more support for the cause.

 

 

Even as she campaigned for the abolition of slavery, Hannah took on another endeavor: education for the poor. She and her younger sister Martha established Sunday Schools since many of their students worked Monday through Saturday. (Child labor wasn’t prohibited in Britain until 1880.) They taught the three R’s and Bible lessons.

Soon three hundred children attended. Then adults were included and job placement provided. Within ten years, the sisters had opened sixteen schools, three of which still functioned into the twentieth century. Hannah involved herself in these schools for thirty years.

 

(Hannah More Academy, built 1834; closed 1974)

 

And of course, Hannah continued to write. She produced numerous pamphlets, plays of Bible stories that missionaries used around the world, as well as Christian novels and nonfiction. Her books outsold Jane Austen’s.

At age eighty-eight Hannah died peacefully in her sleep, just weeks after Parliament abolished slavery. The battle had taken forty years.

Even after her death Hannah’s positive influence lived on. She left the proceeds of her books, 30,000 pounds, for distribution to the poor—the equivalent of three million dollars today.

Hannah wrote in Practical Piety (1811):

 

“We must, while we keep our hearts humble,

keep our aims high . . . As God is unlimited in goodness,

He should have our unlimited love.

The best we can offer is poor, but let us not withhold that best.”

 

No one can say Hannah More did not give her best. May we follow her example.

 

Sources:

  1. https://www.evangelicalmagazine.com/article/hannah-more/
  2. https://www.acton.org/pub/religion-liberty/volume-26-number-1/hannah-more-1745-%E2%80%93-1833
  3. https://www.str.org/w/hannah-more-guided-by-christian-convictions
  4. https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2015/march/hannah-more-powerhouse-in-petticoat.html
  5. https://religionnews.com/2014/11/05/hannah-karen-prior-evangelical/
  6. https://www.christianheadlines.com/columnists/breakpoint/the-power-of-a-poem-hannah-more-and-the-abolition-of-the-slave-trade.html.
  7. https://mylordkatie.wordpress.com/2012/02/22/hannah-more-a-heart-for-the-poor/
  8. https://www.citieschurch.com/journal/culture-shaping-faith
  9. http://christianwomenonline.net/2020/02/18/hannah-more-changing-the-world-with-a-pen/

 

Art & photo credits: http://www.picryl.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.azquotes.com; http://www.wikimedia.org (2); http://www.wikipedia.org; http://www.wikimedia.org (3).

 

 

 

“What takes you to Costa Rica?” the young woman across the aisle asked as we settled into our flight from Tegucigalpa, Honduras to San Jose.

“Oh, it’s just a stopover for me,” I replied. “My final destination is Quito, Ecuador. I’ll be serving as a short-term missionary at HCJB, a television and radio station.”

 

 

“We’re missionaries ourselves,” the woman replied, indicating with a hand-wave her seat mate.

And so began a pleasant conversation that passed the time quickly and helped settle my nerves about traveling alone from one foreign country to another that included an overnight stay in a hotel.

For six weeks of June and July, another girl and I had lived with a missionary family in Tegucigalpa, assisting them with their correspondence school.

 

One little corner of Tegucigalpa, Honduras

 

Laurel would soon head back to America to start college; I was taking a semester off between high school and college to teach preschool and kindergarten for the children of staff members at HCJB.

My very first commercial flights had been with Laurel as we traveled from Chicago to Miami and then Honduras. This twenty-four hour trip was on my own.

Upon arrival in Costa Rica I said good-by to the friendly missionaries and planned to remain in my seat till the plane took off again.

But a flight attendant informed me, “You’ll have to deboard, Senorita. This plane doesn’t go to Panama City.”

Oh-oh. The original itinerary arranged for in May did not include two separate flights and my ticket offered no clues. Now what was I supposed to do? Where should I go? What about my luggage?

 

 

The two missionaries had not left the plane yet. They accompanied me to the information desk inside the airport where a kind gentleman (who spoke excellent English) offered to resolve the problem. He assured the two missionaries all would be well, and I thanked them as they left.

Mr. Info Desk took me to another desk where they arranged for my second flight and made sure my luggage would be transferred.  Then Mr. I. D. invited me to sit nearby.

“I’ll see you to the gate in plenty of time,” he promised. An hour or so later he escorted me through the terminal and even ushered me onto the plane.

 

(The flight took us over the Panama Canal.)

 

In Panama City, while checking through customs, I met a woman from Arizona. We discovered our hotels neighbored each other and planned to share a taxi. But it took much longer for me to be processed–what with my six months-worth of belongings.  We said our good-byes and Ms. Arizona* exited customs.

Not long after I settled at the hotel, my new friend called. “Why don’t you come over and join me at the pool?” she suggested. I accepted her invitation, and we chatted away several delightful hours together.

The next morning all went well from hotel to airport, through emigration, and on to the crowded seating area. I settled next to an older priest, who also happened to be traveling to Quito.

 

(Tocumen International Airport, Panama City, Panama)

 

Our flight time passed without any announcement from the loudspeaker, and still we waited. Meanwhile a soccer team arrived, dressed in gray pants and navy blazers, all talking at once and laughing loudly. Once they left, the room grew noticeably quieter.

“I’m going to see what’s holding up our flight,” announced the Padre, getting up from his seat. “We should have been called long before now.”

He soon returned, announcing, “Grab your bags, Miss. We’re on the same flight with that soccer team. The desk agent didn’t think to announce boarding for the rest of us.”

Only a handful of passengers weren’t soccer players. If not for the travel-wise priest, I surely would have missed that plane.

 

(Quito sits over 9,000 feet above sea level,

nestled between mountains, higher still. )

 

But I arrived safe and sound with no mishaps, even though circumstances could have gone awry numerous times.

The help I received–from at least five people during my journey–seemed too coincidental for mere chance. God undoubtedly intervened.

In fact, it wouldn’t surprise me if the two missionaries, Mr. Info Desk, Ms. Arizona, and the Padre weren’t angels, put in charge of one young and very inexperienced traveler.

 

____________________________________________

 

*No, she wasn’t a beauty queen, I just don’t remember her name after all these decades!

 

Photo credits:  http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.snl.no; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.flickr.com; www. wikimedia.com; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.piqsels.com.

 

When have you received what seemed like angelic assistance?  Tell us about it in the comment section below!

 

Already Given

 

O God, numerous concerns vie for my attention: the state of our country, family needs, friends going through difficult circumstances, my own personal struggles.

Redirect my focus, Father, from what I’m yearning for to what you’ve already given, including:

  • your Spirit of wisdom and revelation
  • your enlightenment to experience hope
  • the riches of your glorious inheritance
  • your incomparably great power*

Each of these gifts is a priceless treasure and more than worthy of meditation and praise.  And so . . .

 

 

. . . I praise you for your spirit of wisdom to guide my thoughts, to equip me for perceiving reality accurately and applying truth correctly.

Help me to trust your all-wise ways and not play the fool, ignoring the treasure of your wisdom that’s always just a prayer away.

 

 

I praise you that year by year, you reveal more and more of yourself to me so our relationship can become increasingly intimate. Never will I tire of learning about you and experiencing you more fully.

 

 

I praise you for your gift of enlightenment to experience hope—complete and calm assurance that you will be victorious in the end, and we’ll live with you forever in the paradise of heaven.

That enlightenment also includes perspective for today. As I focus my thoughts on all you’ve done in the past, my confidence and expectation is affirmed for what you will do in the future.

 

 

I praise you for the riches of your glorious inheritance that we enjoy as your children: your mercy and grace, love and goodness, power and strength–all these and more provided to those who choose to do life with you.

And then there’s the staggering truth we are your inheritance. You look upon your children—even me—not as a liability but as part of your glorious wealth.

 

 

I praise you, O God, that with your incomparably great power, you can take every negative and turn it into a positive. In addition, your dynamic, eternal energy is within me and always available.

No circumstance intimidates you—not the problems of our country, the needs of our family, the difficulties faced by friends, or my own personal struggles. The tougher my day, the stronger your power will flow through me—as long as I stay close by your side.

 

 

I pray for the resolve, holy Father, to avail myself of all this you’ve already given, and may I do so with godly wisdom and constant diligence.

In the name of your Son Jesus who makes such wealth accessible, amen.

 

 

*from Ephesians 1:17-19a.

 

Photo credits:  http://www.piqsels.com (2); http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.piqsels.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.piqsels.com.

 

Meditations of my Heart

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Linda Stoll

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Debby Thompson

Impressions Becoming Expressions

My Cammino

A spiritual learning journey

Colleen Scheid

Writing, Acting, Living the Grace of God

Walking Well With God

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Mitch Teemley

The Power of Story

Heidi Viars

Taking a closer look

(in)courage

Impressions Becoming Expressions