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Archive for October, 2017

 

 

Ever had a sleepless night due to a relentless whirl of what-ifs, a churning jumble of distress and anxiety, a racing heart?

Worry will do that. No wonder we’ve been told worry is bad for us.  In fact, according to Charles Mayo (co-founder of the Mayo Clinic), worry causes adverse affects on the circulatory system, heart, glands, and nervous system.*

But what about concern? Is that different from worry? Is it OK to be concerned?

The answer is yes. Scripture gives much evidence that even our perfect Heavenly Father exhibits concern. He demonstrates:

  • Compassion on all he has made (Psalm 145:9).
  • Care for each of us (1 Peter 5:7).
  • Mindful attention (Hebrews 2:6).
  • Watchful protection (Jeremiah 31:10).
  • Careful planning for us (Psalm 40:5).

 

 

As God exemplifies, concern prompts beneficial action; worry, on the other hand, accomplishes nothing but harm.

Worry creates a thick fog of fear; concern invites God into our experience with all his wisdom, power, and comforting presence. He is, after all, the only One who can dispel fog, whether it’s water vapor in nature or worry on our minds.

Just the reminder our loving Father is right in the midst of the mess with us will do much to sweep away worry.  And “there is heaven in the depth of that word—Father!” (Charles Spurgeon, emphasis added).

Indeed. If we dig into the heavenly depths of our Father’s love we’ll see:

  • The support of his powerful right hand (Psalm 65:8).
  • The protection of his everlasting arms (Deuteronomy 33:27).
  • The comfort of being carried close to his heart (Isaiah 40:10).

 

 

And that’s just for starters.

If we dig into what we know about him, we can affirm:

  • “Nothing happens in any particular unless God’s will is behind it; therefore [we] can rest in perfect confidence in him” (Oswald Chambers).
  • The God who made us will equip us for whatever lies ahead—even if it’s unpleasant (Habakkuk 3:19).
  • Difficulties most often set the scene for his glory to be displayed (Romans 11:36).

 

 

Sometimes, though, the fog of worry shrouds even the strongest mental images and the most affirming truths. We’re forced to admit: trustful concern is not easy.

For most of us, it is a learned discipline that grows over time. Slowly we’re able to embrace the truth that all will be well because all is in God’s perfect and capable hands. Slowly we develop the habit of affirming God’s character and power, to develop a near worry-less state of contentment.

And we learn the value of gratitude amidst turmoil—as illogical as that may sound. The very act of thanking God releases our minds from negative focus. When we turn our attention to him, problems fade in significance and the fog is dispersed. That’s why Paul recommended, “Pray with thanksgiving” (Philippians 4:6).

 

 

And that’s how we turn worthless worry into productive concern.

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

I thank you, Father, that NO situation is hopeless because you are the God of eternal hope. I can count on you because you are the God of universal sovereignty, complete sufficiency, and abundant goodness.

I thank you for your comforting presence, for your power at work (even though I can’t see it right now), and for your glorious promise that you always bring good from every situation. I praise you that, while we may sow in tears, there will come the day we reap with songs of joy. Hallelujah!

 

2 Thessalonians 2:16-17; Romans 11:36; 2 Corinthians 3:5; Psalm 145:7;

Matthew 28:20; John 5:17; Romans 8:28; Psalm 126:5

 

*www.todayinsci.com.

 

(Art & photo credits:  http://www.flicker.com; http://www.wallpaper4god.com; http://www.youtube.com; http://www.pinterest.com; http://www.flickr.com.)

 

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Tuesday evening I returned from an out-of-state visit with family. Steve picked me up at the airport.

“Where would you like to go for dinner?” he asked as we walked toward the luggage carousel.

“How about the Korean restaurant?”

Just thinking about their savory dishes made me even hungrier than I already was.

 

 

Minutes later my suitcase was stowed in the trunk.  We drove out of the parking garage and approached the exit tollbooth.

Steve rolled down his window. “Good evening!” he called to the female attendant.

“Hello,” the woman responded dully, without even a hint of smile.

“Hard day?” Steve asked.

She reached out to take the ticket from his hand.  “I’m just frustrated,” she responded.

A quick glance out the rear window assured me no other vehicles were in sight. I felt compelled to engage with the hurting woman; Korean stir fry could wait.

“Nobody’s coming,” I said to the woman. “Would you like to tell us about it?”

After a slight pause she began to share.

“I am a college graduate, but since I’ve become disabled, this is the only job I could find. It’s just three days a week, too, and people are so RUDE!”

 

 

We nodded our heads in agreement.

“What’s your name?” Steve asked.

“Ginny*,” she replied, and indicated her nameplate on the booth.

Oops. Steve and I had both missed it.

“Well, Ginny,” Steve continued, “we are people of faith and have seen God answer many prayers and provide many blessings. We’re going to be praying for you.”

Her first blessing was instantaneous. Steve handed Ginny a generous tip, and she smiled.

 

 

“You don’t need to do that.” She tried to give the money back.

“No, no. You keep it,” Steve persuaded her. “Maybe it’ll make up a little for the rudeness you’ve dealt with today.”

“Well, thank you SO much! And may God bless you, too!”

“Oh, he does!” I assured her.

Steve pulled away from the booth before other cars approached. And I offered my first prayer for Ginny.

Thank you, Father,  for the opportunity to provide encouragement. What a delight to see Ginny smile. I pray she experiences strengthened hope in you and saving faith in your Son, Jesus.

Yesterday morning, I happened upon Proverbs 13:2a and was reminded of our tollbooth encounter the night before:

 

 

“From the fruit of their lips people enjoy good things.”

 

Oh yes, Lord. We did enjoy good things last night with Ginny.

In our effort to lift her spirit, we too were uplifted. What a privilege to draw Ginny’s attention to you, relieve her stress a bit, and boost her morale. There’s also the joy of anticipation, knowing you will honor our prayers for her (1 John 5:14-15).

Then my imagination kicked in. I pictured us driving up to Ginny’s tollbooth sometime in the future. We’ll tell her how we’ve prayed for her.

Steve will ask, “How’s it going?”

And an effervescent Ginny will share that God has blessed her life in jaw-dropping ways.

In reality, however, it’s likely we’ll never see Ginny again. Part of God’s plan may be to graduate her from that booth into more fulfilling employment, long before we have opportunity for another encounter.

Oh, but wait. Perhaps we will get to hear Ginny’s story one day. And we won’t have to watch for cars approaching from the rear.

I’m picturing a picnic—Ginny, Steve, and me—seated by the crystal river in heaven (Revelation 22:1).  We’ll chatter away like old friends, celebrating God’s glorious blessings and miraculous ways.

 

 

Now that will be a very good thing to enjoy.

 

*Name changed.

*     *      *      *      *      *      *      *      *      *

What good things have you enjoyed lately from the fruit of your lips? Please share your story in the comments below!

 

(Art & photo credits:  http://www.wikimedia.com (3); http://www.flickr.com; http://www.primobibleverses.com; http://www.pixabay.com.)

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Conventional wisdom teaches that success comes to those who work hard to achieve their goals.  And to a point that’s true.

But.  Success can quickly crumble when tragedy strikes.

Ask Job; he’ll tell you.  He was an extremely wealthy man and the greatest among all the people of the East.

He enjoyed a large, loving family.  His children liked each other so much they partied together.

Job was blameless and upright—totally undeserving of what happened to him (Job 1:1-4).

Stripped of everything.  All his wealth.  All his wonderful children.

 

 

Some of the recent hurricane victims know the magnitude of such horror. Home and all contents, gone.  Family members, gone.  I can’t even imagine their emotional pain and heartache.

And what was Job’s reaction to his tragedy?

If you had asked me that question a couple of years ago, I would have answered:  Job was incredibly accepting; he didn’t even blame God (1:22).

But there’s more:

“He fell to the ground in worship” (v. 20b).

 

 

WHAT?!

How can a person possibly worship at a time like that, when his whole world has collapsed around him?

All Job had left was his foundation—a foundation of faith in God.

And worship was his expression of that faith, declaring God’s worth to him—in spite of horrific calamity.  For Job, God was enough.

From Job we learn that true worship is not reliant upon circumstances.  In fact, a sacrifice of praise (Hebrews 13:15) is surely very precious in God’s view.

 

 

Second, true worship is not reliant upon emotions.  We don’t have to be filled with joy in order to worship.  We can worship God with our tears, expressing our trust in spite of the pain.

Job couldn’t rely on answers that would give meaning for his suffering.  God gave him none.  What Job did rely upon was God’s character:

  • “His wisdom is profound, his power is vast” (9:4a).
  • “He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted” (9:10).
  • “If it is a matter of strength, he is mighty!  And if it is a matter of justice who will summon him?”  (9:19).
  • “You gave me life and showed me kindness, and in your providence watched over my spirit” (10:12).

 

 

  • “To God belong wisdom and power; counsel and understanding are his (12:13).
  • “Can anyone teach knowledge to God, since he judges even the highest” (21:22)?

In the end, knowing God was more important to Job than knowing answers.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Heavenly Father, I shake my head in wonder as people of faith such as Job neither blame you nor give up on you in the face of calamity.  Instead, they rely upon you all the more tenaciously.  They worship, affirming that you are still their sovereign, loving God; they testify of your strength and peace. 

Thank you for being a God who comes alongside us with your wisdom and grace, especially when we’re hurting.  Thank you for powerful examples to follow such as Job.

 

(Art & photo credits:  http://www.flickr.com; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.pinterest.com (2); http://www.flickr.com.)

 

Revised and reblogged from June 17, 2013.

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If you’re looking for spectacular views of fall foliage this year, do not come to southwest Ohio where we live. It would appear the wetter-than-normal weather of 2017 has contributed to early, lackluster color and quickly dropping leaves.

By contrast, last year offered an autumn extravaganza:

 

(Spring Grove Cemetery & Arboretum,

Cincinnati, Ohio)

 

Just what causes the rich jewel tones of color in the fall?  I recently relearned the answer from one of my granddaughter’s picture books (!).

In early fall, due to fewer hours of sunlight, cooling temperatures, and less rain (usually), the leaves no longer receive sufficient light and water. They start to separate from the tree, the chlorophyll fades, and the green color begins to disappear.

Now the yellows and oranges, present in the leaves all along, become visible. Some leaves make new pigments from the extra sugar stored inside. These leaves turn red, rust, pink, and purple.

 

 

The variety of hues represents some of the most vibrant shades on the color wheel.

And each hue, you may recall, has been assigned a meaning.

Red symbolizes power and strength;

Yellow, energy and intellect.

Orange represents joy and happiness;

Green, stability and safety.

Purple signifies royalty and power;

Pink, love and friendship (1).

M-m-m. Every one of those attributes describes our God.

As we ooh and aah over the wonder of autumn (even if only in small patches!), what if we allow each color to inspire worship?

For example, the brilliant red of the sugar maples can be a reminder he is tireless, never even needing a nap (Psalm 121:4).

 

 

He can accomplish anything–like create human beings and a complex, life-sustaining planet for them–because he is the one and only Lord, strong and mighty (Psalm 147:5).

Creation also demonstrates his superior intellectual abilities (Romans 11:33-36) since mysteries still abound in the universe–even after centuries of human inquiry. Gaze at the luminous golden ginkgo trees and affirm: our God knows all and never makes an unwise decision.

 

 

A fiery orange serviceberry tree is sure to make you smile with delight. Turn that smile toward your Heavenly Father, the source of all joy (Romans 14:17).

 

 

Evergreens provide a continual reminder of our ever-present refuge in him (Psalm 46:1) and his enduring faithfulness to us (Psalm 100:5).

 

 

Sweet gum trees don robes of purple in autumn. This color of royalty since ancient times can remind us of our Ancient of Days, the King of all the earth (Psalm 47:7).

 

 

Last, the pink leaves of the burning bush can signify the loving friendship he offers (John 15:15), “practical and down-to-earth, yet saturated with heavenly glory” (2).

 

 

Whether or not we live in an area where these splendorous colors are on display, we can remember: God’s glory surrounds us just as autumn blaze can envelope a region.

 

After all, the whole earth is full of his glory” (Isaiah 6:3, emphasis added).

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Thank you, Lord God, that every facet of your character is on display in your creation, giving us opportunity to “see” you. Even the changing leaves of fall call attention to your magnificent attributes. But even more wonderful—you manifest these qualities in our circumstances and in our hearts. Who is like you—majestic in holiness, awesome in glory, and always working wonders?  We praise you, O Lord, now and forever!

Romans 1:20; Exodus 15:11; Psalm 145:1  

 

Notes:

  1. colorwheelpro.com
  2. Sarah Young, Jesus Calling, Thomas Nelson, 2004, p. 260.

 

Photo credits:  http://www.flickr.com; http://www.publicdomainpictures.net; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com; http://www.publicdomainpictures.net; http://www.pixabay.com (2); http://www.flickr.com.

 

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