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Archive for the ‘God-Given Abilities’ Category

Did you catch last week’s post, “There’s No Such Thing as a Christian Genius?”

That title came from a blog-responder some years ago who didn’t realize evidence refuted his opinion. Intelligence is to be found among believers in Jesus—in the sciences (as we discovered last week), and in the humanities, as presented below:

ART 

Albrecht Durer (1471-1528)—considered by many as the greatest Renaissance artist of northern Europe. His career began at the dawn of the Reformation under Martin Luther, whom Durer supported.

One of his prayers penned five hundred years ago is just as applicable today. Included here are excerpts:

 

O God in heaven, have mercy on us!

Preserve in us the true genuine Christian faith,

Help us recognize your voice,

Help us not to be allured by the madness of the world,

So that we may never fall away from you,

O Lord Jesus Christ (1).

 

Self-portrait of Durer

 

Casper David Friedrich (1774-1840) produced more than 500 works. He is best known for his landscapes, all of which possessed a spiritual quality and meaning.

Friedrich expressed his convictions in poetry as well:

 

Through the gloomy clouds break

Blue sky, sunshine,

On the heights and in the valley

Sing the lark and the nightingale.

God, I thank you that I live

Not forever in this world

Strengthen me that my soul rise

Upward toward your firmament (2).

 

Two Men Contemplating the Moon by Friedrich, ca. 1824

 

Thomas Cole (1801-1848) was one of several who led the Hudson River School, a group of painters known for their realistic landscapes.

They desired to portray the presence of God in his creation. One technique was to include small human figures surrounded by mammoth trees and vast meadows.

Cole saw “the mission of the artist as a spiritual one, to spread the Word of God through art devoted to nature” (3). To that end, Cole prayed before he painted.

 

Dream of Arcadia by Cole, ca. 1838

 

MUSIC

George Frideric Handel produced numerous works in at least seven genres. His most remarkable effort is perhaps his most famous composition, Messiah, which he accomplished in just twenty-four days.

In 1759, while receiving an ovation after his last performance, Handel cried out: “Not from me…but from Heaven…comes all” (4).

He hoped to die on Easter, hoping to “meet his good God, his sweet Lord and Savior, on the day of his Resurrection” (5). Handel arrived in heaven the day before, in 1759.

 

George Frideric Handel

 

Johann Sebastian Bach, another prolific composer, is considered one of the greatest Western composers of all time.

While serving as a church organist and teacher, he set an impossible goal: write a different cantata for every Sunday, for three years. Not only did Bach create the music, but made sure his singers and instrumentalists had copies, and time to rehearse with him before each Sunday’s service.

Even on his secular works, Bach often wrote “I.N.J.” for “in the name of Jesus.” Finished manuscripts were frequently initialed, “S.D.G.”—Soli Deo Gloria (to God alone, the glory) (6).

 

“Soli Deo Gloria” in Bach’s own hand, bottom right

 

Felix Mendelssohn excelled in numerous fields: philosophy, linguistics, watercolor painting, poetry, gymnastics, and of course, music. During his brief life of only thirty-eight years, Mendelssohn produced approximately 750 musical works in nearly every genre.

He gained great popularity and prestige as a musician, yet maintained a humble and devout faith in Christ.  In one of his letters, Mendelssohn wrote: “Pray to God that He may create in us a clean heart and renew a right spirit within us” (7).

 

 

LITERATURE 

Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861) had no equal in the literary history of any country, according to the Edinburg Review (8). Her literary works reflected keen intelligence and deep faith. As a teenager, she taught herself Hebrew so she could read the Old Testament with greater understanding.

Browning’s writings often explored Christian themes:

 

“Earth is crammed with heaven,

and every common bush is afire with God.

And only those who see take off their shoes;

the rest sit around and pluck blackberries” (9).

–from Aurora Leigh

 

And from the poem, “Comfort”:

 

“SPEAK low to me, my Saviour, low and sweet
From out the hallelujahs, sweet and low
Lest I should fear and fall, and miss Thee so
Who art not missed by any that entreat” (10).

 

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

 

G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936) distinguished himself as an essayist, columnist, humorist, poet, and novelist. About him, one evangelical scholar wrote : “There has not been a more articulate champion of classic Christianity, virtue, and decency.”

Articulate, indeed:

“Just going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than standing in your garage makes you a car”—original source unknown (11).

“These are the days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed except his own.”—from the Illustrated News, 8-11-1928 (12).

 

G. K. Chesterton

 

Clive Staples Lewis (1898–1963), professor at Oxford and then Cambridge, is considered one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century. He authored more than thirty books; many are popular to this day.

Lewis came to Christian faith out of atheism, through the reading of such authors as George MacDonald, G. K. Chesterton, and others. Also influential, other intellectuals of faith associated with Oxford, including J. R. R. Tolkien.

C. S. Lewis came to understand:

“Look for yourself and you will find in the long run only hatred, loneliness despair, rage, ruin, and decay. But look for Christ and you find Him, and with Him, everything else thrown in”from Mere Christianity (13).

 

C. S. Lewis, ca. 1940

______________________________

 

As noted last week, it is a fact many acclaimed geniuses have chosen not to become Christians.

But it cannot be said there is no such thing as a Christian genius.

Again, who would you add to the list?  Please share in the comment section below!

 

Notes:

  1. historyofpainters.com/durer/
  2. As quoted and translated by Linda Siegel in Caspar David Friedrich and the Age of German Romanticism, 1978, p. 48.
  3. https://www.equip.org/article/what-has-art-to-do-with-evangelism/
  4. christianheritageedinburgh.uk
  5. https://www.christianitytoday.com/history/people/musiciansartistsandwriters/george-frideric-handel.html
  6. christianheritageedinburgh.uk
  7. thirdmill.org/paul/impact_mendelssohn.asp
  8. poetryfoundation.org/poets/elizabeth-barrett-browning
  9. https://www.bartleby.com/236/86.html
  10. https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/comfort/
  11. http://famousquotefrom.com/g-k-chesterton/
  12. https://www.chesterton.org/quotations-of-g-k-chesterton/
  13. http://www.cslewisinstitute.org/cslewisonauthenticdiscipleshippage4

 

Photo credits:  http://www.flickr.com; http://www.picryl.com; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org; http://www.wikimedia.org (2); http://www.flickr.com.

 

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At least that’s what an anonymous responder tried to persuade the readership on a blog some years ago. According to this person, the Bible is just “a bad book of poetry” that no intelligent person would believe. And he challenged other readers to name a Christian genius (1).

Okay.  Here are a few to begin the list:

MATHEMATICS

Blaise Pascal’s notable mathematical works included the development of the theory of probabilities. Later in life, he devoted himself to theological writings. “There is a God-shaped vacuum in the heart of every man which cannot be filled by any created thing, but only by God, the Creator, made known through Jesus” (2).

 

Blaise Pascal (1623-1727)

 

Sir Isaac Newton, famous for his laws of physics, also paved the way for the subject of calculus. He too dedicated his later years to interpreting scripture. “Godliness consists in the knowledge, love, and worship of God, Humanity in love, righteousness & good offices towards man” (3), he wrote.

 

Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727)

 

Dr. John Lennox is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at the University of Oxford. He has published over seventy mathematical papers and co-authored two research level texts in algebra. But Lennox is also an astute Christian apologist, and has written such books as Can Science Explain Everything (4)?

 

Dr. John Lennox (1943- )

 

SCIENCE

Sir Francis Bacon, who established the scientific method, viewed science as a way to learn deeper truths about God. In his will, he included this final prayer: “When I thought most of peace and honor, thy hand [was] heavy on me, and hath humbled me, according to thy former loving kindness. … Just are thy judgments upon my sins. … Be merciful unto me for my Savior’s sake, and receive me into thy bosom” (5).

 

Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626)

 

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)–One of the most important and influential physicists, astronomers, inventors and scientists to ever live. He saw no conflict between science and faith in God. “God is known by nature in his works, and by doctrine in his revealed word” (6).

 

 

James Clerk Maxwell memorized the Bible by the age of 14.  Yes, the whole thing. His extensive scientific studies determined that light is an electromagnetic wave, and his kinetic theory established that temperature is entirely dependent on the speeds of particles. Upon his death, a colleague wrote: “We his contemporaries at college, have seen in him high powers of mind and great capacity and original views, conjoined with deep humility before his God, reverent submission to His will, and hearty belief in the love and atonement of that Divine Savior” (7).

 

James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879)

 

MEDICINE

Sir James Simpson, an outstanding obstetrician, pioneered many techniques in his field. He’s also credited for his discovery of the anesthetic qualities of chloroform. But when asked by a journalist about his greatest discovery, Dr. Simpson replied he was a sinner and Jesus Christ his Savior (8).

 

Sir James Simpson (1811-1870)

 

Dr. Joseph Lister, the father of modern surgery, determined as a medical student to not just practice medicine, but to also conduct research. Among the surgical techniques he developed, Lister proved the benefits of antiseptic surgery. A devout Quaker, Lister made it clear: “I am a believer in the fundamental doctrines of Christianity” (9).

 

Dr. Joseph Lister (1827-1912)

 

Alexander Fleming–biologist, physician, microbiologist, and pharmacologist—changed the world when he discovered penicillin, but he gave God the credit. “Discoveries of this magnitude are rare . . . God took care to hide that country till he judged his people ready; then, he chose me for his whisper and I found it and it’s yours.” Fleming also asserted: “My greatest discovery was that I needed God, and that I was nothing without him and that he loved me and showed his love by sending Jesus to save me” (10).

 

Alexander Fleming (1881-1955)

 

Still further evidence of genius is found among the humanities. In an effort to keep this post of reasonable length, I’ll save that topic for next week.   But perhaps you’ll enjoy uncovering evidence for yourself of the godly faith of these Christians and others. The websites listed below offer a beginning point.

It is a fact that many proclaimed geniuses have chosen not to become Christians. God has chosen to bestow brilliant minds among all mankind, just as he grants the rain on the just and the unjust (Matthew 5:45).

But it cannot be said there is no such thing as a Christian genius.

 

___________________________________________

 

What Christian geniuses would you add to the list?

Please share in the comment section below!

 

Notes:

1. http://www.rightnation.us/forums/index.php?autocom=blog&blogid=7&showentry=742

2. https://www.timetoast.com/timelines/contributions-of-famous-christian-mathematicians 

3.  same as above

4.  https://www.rzim.org/speakers/john-lennox

5.  https://www.christianitytoday.com/history/people/scholarsandscientists/francis-bacon.html

6.  https://www.christianitytoday.com/history/people/scholarsandscientists/galileo-galilei.html

7.  https://creation.com/great-creation-scientists-james-clerk-maxwell

8.  http://evangelicalfocus.com/blogs/3118/The_Reformation_and_Medicine_My_lecture_to_commemorate_the_500th_anniversary-

9.  https://answersingenesis.org/creation-scientists/joseph-lister-father-of-modern-surgery/

10.  http://www.staplefordresources.co.uk/files/files/Alexander_Fleming.pdf

 

Other Sources:

https://coldcasechristianity.com/writings/the-rich-historic-roll-call-of-great-christian-thinkers-and-scientists/

https://www.famousscientists.org/great-scientists-christians/

http://evangelicalfocus.com/blogs/3118/thereformationandmedicinemylecturetocommemoratethe500thanniversary_

https://relevantmagazine.com/god/9-groundbreaking-scientists-who-happened-be-christians/

https://answersingenesis.org/intelligent-design/signature-god-medicine-and-microbiology/

 

Art & Photo credits:  http://www.wikimedia.org (2); http://www.flickr.com; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.azquotes.com; http://www.flickr.com (2); http://www.wikimedia.org (2).

 

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Every now and then, even positive people are bothered by a niggling, accusatory voice in their heads, offering such (Please note the sarcasm.) helpful comments as:

  • “Look at that guy—one successful venture after another. What have you accomplished lately, Ms./Mr. Nobody?”
  • “Everybody in that group was so articulate compared to you. Why are you such an idiot?”
  • “This assignment is way beyond your abilities. You’re gonna make a fool of yourself.”

Such self-talk is destructive; you know it. But how do you turn it off?  With affirmative battle cries. Positive rebuttal will send those self-critical thoughts into retreat—back to the darkness where they came from.

A proper battle cry can stir up encouragement, inspire perseverance, and be a reminder of who you really are, as well as what you can actually do.

And the very best battle cries are based on scripture.  These examples may provide a good place to start:

  1. You are a cherished daughter/son of God!

You may be focused on your inadequacies and failures, but God is not. His attention is riveted on what you will be—completely perfect and whole.

And as he works within you toward that goal, he rejoices in your progress. Follow his example, and celebrate your steps on the right path.

 

 

  1. You are a masterpiece–not a mess!

Consider what constitutes a masterpiece: artistic genius, extraordinary design, superlative craftsmanship, and originality—among other glorious qualities.  That’s YOU!

Never forget: the greatest Artistic Genius of the universe created you. He fashioned a one-of-a-kind mold for your personality, your particular traits and talents, your specific purpose.  Embrace who he made you to be.

 

 

  1. You have been created in the image of God himself!

And he’s given you the privilege to brightly reflect his magnificent image to those around you.

Consider yourself a stained glass window, with God’s light (all his magnificent attributes) gleaming through the shapes and colors of your individuality, your abilities, in order to bless those around you.

 

 

  1. You are a true Superman/Superwoman!

More than a conqueror,” Paul said.  That makes you a super-conqueror (!), through the one who loves you–Jesus.

And because of him, you are guaranteed victory in the end.  Now each day can be viewed as an adventure with God, not an affliction.

 

 

  1. You are capable to accomplish anything God prepares for you to do!

That’s because nothing is impossible for him. He goes ahead of you to prepare the way, and supplies the abilities necessary to complete your mission.

In addition, “[He] will help you deal with whatever hard things come up–when the time comes” (Matthew 6:34, MSG).

 

 

  1. You are equipped to thrive!

In the soil of God’s unfailing love, and with the nourishment of his encouraging Word, you can grow seeds of contentment, and they will produce the fruit of joy and peace.

 

   

 

So!  Are you feeling inadequate for the day or frustrated by what you face?

Perhaps a few of these battle cries speak to your situation. State them firmly out loud, and for greater impact, speak in front of a mirror.

Affirm to yourself who you are really.

___________________________________

 

Scriptural support for each battle cry:

  1. 1 John 3:1-2; Hebrews 10:14; Philippians 1:6; Psalm 147:11; Psalm 119:35.
  2. Ephesians 2:10 NLT; Psalm 139:16; Proverbs 19:21.
  3. Genesis 1:27; 2 Corinthians 3:18.
  4. Romans 8:37; 1 Corinthians 15:57.
  5. Philippians 4:13; Matthew 19:26; Ephesians 2:10; Psalm 37:23 CSB; 1 Peter 4:11; Matthew 6:34 MSG, emphasis added.
  6. John 10:10; Jeremiah 29:11; 2 Timothy 3:17; Ephesians 3:17-19; Psalm 119:24; Philippians 4:12-13; 1 Peter 1:8-9; Isaiah 26:3.

 

What battle cry against the negative self-talk helps you?  Please add your suggestion in the Comment section below!

 

(Photo credits:  http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.pixabay.com.)

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How would you complete the following sentence?

The most beautiful and beneficial therapy God ever granted humanity is:

  1. Prayer
  2. Worship
  3. Laughter
  4. Camaraderie with other believers

To be fair, all four of those God-given gifts are therapeutic. But pastor/author Charles Swindoll considers Answer C, laughter, as number one (1).

 

 

Perhaps he’s familiar with the research documenting the benefits of an enthusiastic guffaw. Laughter has been proven to:

  • Reduce stress, depression, and blood pressure
  • Increase the production of HDL (good cholesterol)
  • Improve immunity, mood, and sleep
  • Improve the function of lungs, heart, and cardiovascular system
  • Help relieve artery inflammation and pain

In fact, “the medical world has verified that laughter releases endorphins, God’s natural painkillers, which are fifty to one hundred times more powerful than morphine” (2).   Wowsers!

No wonder God inspired King Solomon to write: “A cheerful heart is good medicine” (Proverbs 17:22).

 

 

I’m thinking our Heavenly Father also receives benefit and blessing as he takes delight in the laughter of his children–just as human parents (and grandparents!) do.

In addition, when we face the day lightheartedly and find humor even when life is hard, we’re actually expressing our trust in God.  That blesses him too.

Phillip Yancey has identified similarities between laughter and prayer–of all things. “In both acts, we stand on equal ground,” he says, “freely acknowledging ourselves as fallen creatures. We take ourselves less seriously…Laughter and prayer unite” (3).

I hadn’t thought of that before. Prayer does unite our hearts as we present together the same requests to God.

Laughter unites us too–young and old, employers and employees–even total strangers. We “become a single group of human beings, enjoying [our] existence”—W. Grant Lee.  And if we include God, the joy is multiplied.

 

 

But most of us won’t accumulate enough laughter in a day to do much good unless we intentionally seek it out. So the question becomes: how do we jump-start the habit of laughter and make it a morning-noon-and-night event?

Here are five suggestions to get the laughs rolling:

  • Purchase a joke-of-the-day calendar or access a humor website like Reader’s Digest’s https://www.rd.com/jokes/, and start the day with a few giggles. To increase the benefit further, share the joke with someone else.  Here’s a short sample–easy to remember!

 

 

  • Watch a few minutes of humorous YouTube videos. You can’t go wrong with Tim Hawkins, Chonda Pierce, or Michael Jr. I can almost guarantee they’ll have you in stitches, even if you watch them all by yourself.   But for best results, invite one or two others to watch and chuckle along with you.  Here’s Chonda Pierce talking about piano lessons:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjcfdnqSvT0

 

  • Spend time with young children. They laugh easily and so delectably, you won’t be able to resist laughing yourself.

 

 

 

 

  • Start a collection of jokes, cartoons, and humorous statements—whatever makes you laugh. You’ll be prepared with some giggle-makers when stress mounts, anxiety flares, or disappointment deflates the day.

 

Perhaps you’ll find one or two laugh-prompts here to begin your compilation:

 

  • “Normal is just a setting on the dryer.”—Patsy Clairmont

 

  • “Exercise in the morning—before your brain figures out what you’re doing.”—Unknown

 

 

  • “Youth is a disease from which we all recover”—Dorothy Fulheim.

 

  • “Gardening is cheaper than therapy and you get tomatoes”—Unknown.

 

  • “Grandmas are moms with lots of frosting”—Unknown.

 

 

  • When Miss Andrews took her first graders to music class, the teacher, Mrs. Judson, wasn’t there. To keep the children productively occupied until she arrived, Miss Andrews asked the class if they knew the person whose name was written in big letters on the board: John Philip Sousa. One little boy raised his hand. “I don’t know who he is,” the first grader responded, “but if his name is on the board, he’s in big trouble” (4).

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

Thank you, Father, for giving us the ability to laugh. It truly is a gift of your grace, refreshing our spirits and opening our hearts to your joy. Teach us to express our trust in you with laughter, defying our worries and fears with frequent chuckles, giggles, and hoots!

 

 

What made you laugh recently?  Please share in the comment section below!

 

Notes:

  1.  www.christianquotes.info
  2. Marilyn Meberg, Joy Breaks
  3. Philip Yancey, Grace Notes
  4. True story! It happened at the school where I taught for many years.  Teachers’ names have been changed.

 

Art & photo credits:  http://www.pexels.com; http://www.deviantart.com; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.canva.com; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.flickr.com (2); http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.afgsc.af.mil.

 

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(Wilfred Grenfell, 1865-1940)

 

Dr. Wilfred Grenfell listened to the ill fisherman’s labored breathing. He took note of the patient’s fever-flushed cheeks and chill-induced tremors. The diagnosis: severe pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis as well.

With little equipment and scant supplies at hand, Grenfell was unable to save the man. Left behind were the man’s wife and six children, subsisting in a tiny sod house.

 

 

Who would care for the destitute family? Everyone in the fishing village of Battle Harbor, Labrador was barely surviving. In fact, up and down the coast similar tragedies occurred frequently because of the primitive living conditions.

The year was 1892. Dr. Grenfell had just recently arrived on the northeastern coast of Canada.

 

 

Over the next three months of summer, he treated about nine hundred people for a variety of medical conditions. And God used those experiences to stir him into action—action for which he had been preparing Grenfell for his entire life.

During his childhood, Wilfred’s parents, Reverend Algernon and Jane Grenfell, provided a strong Christian upbringing for their four sons. Grenfell then studied medicine at London Hospital and London University under the mentorship of the highly respected Christian surgeon, Sir Frederick Treves.

 

(Sir Frederick Treves)

 

But a life-changing moment occurred for Grenfell in 1885 when he attended a tent-revival meeting held by D. L. Moody. Grenfell accepted Moody’s spirited challenge to serve Christ with passion and courage.

Not long after, he heard the Cambridge Seven speak—famous student athletes at the time, serving as missionaries in China. Wilfred felt further inspired to follow God’s leading toward Christian service.

 

(The Cambridge Seven in Mandarin garb, 1885)

 

Upon graduation from medical school, Wilfred joined the Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, on recommendation of his mentor and board member of the mission, Sir Frederick Treves.

The RNMDSF already provided floating libraries, clothing stores, and chapels. Now Grenfell could add medical services to the other benefits.

 

(The Royal National Mission to Deep-Sea Fishermen,

still in operation since its founding in 1881.)

 

His travels with the mission brought Grenfell to Labrador where the living conditions were so dire he felt compelled to do what he could to improve them.

In addition to offering medical care, Grenfell held simple church services, preaching what he remembered from his father’s sermons. Numerous people chose to follow Jesus; others were strengthened in their faith.

Over the course of the next four decades Grenfell built six hospitals and opened seven nursing stations. He established fourteen industrial centers, a number of churches, and  four boarding schools.

 

 

At first, the Royal National Mission to Deep-Sea Fishermen financed his work. But it soon became necessary for Grenfell to raise monies himself. God equipped him for this aspect of the work also, and very quickly he became a successful fundraiser and charismatic speaker.

One close-call adventure Grenfell relayed often on his speaking tours, and it finally became a book. (He wrote more than thirty books—all for the support of his mission work.)

 

 

In April of 1908 he found himself drifting out to sea on a chunk of ice with no hope of survival. He’d been dog sledding across the frozen Hope Bay, headed for a remote community in Newfoundland where a young boy needed surgery.

But conditions on the bay changed overnight while he rested. The ice began to break up. Though Grenfell tried to jump from one ice chunk to another in order to return to shore, he soon realized it was wasted effort. The floe was moving too fast.

 

(Drift ice off the coast of Labrador)

 

For a day and a night, Grenfell continued to drift. He was sure the rough seas would make rescue impossible. But a small group of fishermen in a boat did spot him and came to his aid.

Later, he described his rescuers as five men “with Newfoundland muscles in their backs and five as brave hearts as ever beat in the bodies of human beings” (Adrift on an Ice Pan, 1909).

Two days later, Grenfell was able to perform surgery on the young boy, who was brought to the local hospital by boat—a much more satisfactory solution.

In addition to his accomplishments and great adventures, Grenfell’s full life also included disappointment and doubt, trouble and sorrow, even failure. But he knew where to find strength and encouragement:

 

“The word of God is the Christian soul’s best weapon,

and it is essential to have it with him always.

In doubt it decides; in consultation it directs;

in anxiety it reassures, in sorrow it comforts;

in failure it encourages; in defense it protects;

in offense it is mightier than the mighty.”

–Wilfred Grenfell

 

Thus empowered, the great doctor accomplished his divinely appointed mission–day by day, year after year—with passion and courage.

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

That is what we desire as well, Father, to accomplish the mission you’ve divinely-appointed for each of us. May we embrace with faith, courage, and passion the possibilities you present before us, in honor of you, and because your pleasure always becomes ours as well.

 

(P.S. The winter after the ice floe rescue, Grenfell met Anna MacClanahan of Lake Forest, Illinois. They were married in November of 1909, and she quickly became Grenfell’s private secretary, editor, and adviser. They had two sons and one daughter.)

 

 

 

Sources:

  1. http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/grenfell_wilfred_thomason_16E.html
  2. http://www.canadianchristianleaders.org/leader/wilfred-grenfell/
  3. http://www.cdnmedhall.org/inductees/sir-wilfred-grenfell
  4. http://www.greatthoughtstreasury.com/author/wilfred-grenfell-fully-sir-wilfred-thomason-grenfell
  5. http://www.grenfellhistory.co.uk/biographies/wilfred_thomason_grenfell.php
  6. https://www.heritage.nf.ca/articles/society/grenfell-mission.php
  7. https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/fifteen-canadian-stories-wilfred-grenfell-the-daring-doctor-who-brought-hospitals-to-newfoundland

 

Art & photo credits:  http://www.flickr.com;www.wikimedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org; http://www.wikimedia.org (2); http://www.geograph.org.uk; http://www.flickr.com (2); http://www.picryl.com; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.picryl.com.

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Imagine God on the sixth day of creation, surveying the work he’s accomplished.

Craggy mountain peaks reach upward toward cerulean skies.

 

 

Undulating oceans teem with thousands of different kinds of fish and sea creatures—from protozoa to humpback whales.

 

 

Flat lands and rolling hills, some covered with grass, others with trees, also abound with life—from pixie cups that can only hold one drop of water…

 

 

…to elephants that can drink 80 gallons per day.

“And God saw that it was good” (Genesis 1:25).

But he wasn’t finished yet. God created one more being capable of deep thought, complex interaction, and an array of emotions. He called the creature “man” (vs. 26-27).

 

 

And the Lord Most High endowed man with abilities similar to his own. For example:

  • God is creative; people have the ability to produce new works and ideas.
  • God is linguistic; people can communicate with words.
  • God is logical; people are capable of reason.
  • God is interpersonal; people have the capacity to develop relationships.
  • God is wise; people can develop wisdom.
  • God is gracious and compassionate; people are capable of responding to one another with patience, kindness, and encouragement.

 

 

Just like our Father, each of us is (to some degree) capable of all these abilities. We can creatively solve problems, retell events, weigh the pros and cons of a decision, make friends, choose wisely from the grocery store shelves, offer a compliment.

But evidence would indicate God chose to endow each of us further, with a particular intelligence in which to excel. Our own family includes:

  • Two creatives—an artist and a graphic designer
  • Two linguistics—both pastors
  • One logistic—a tech support manager
  • Three interpersonal types—a teacher, school psychologist, and psychiatric/family doctor

 

 

Each person also has secondary and even tertiary strengths, in various combinations.

Yet God didn’t stop there. In his image he made us spiritual beings as well. Within each person is an invisible, eternal soul, a place where we can experience his presence (Ephesians 3:16-19). And he gave us a conscience to know right from wrong—not to spoil our enjoyment of life but to enhance it (Psalm 128:1-2).

 

 

As wondrous as all these gifts are—individually designed strengths, eternal souls, and the compass of a conscience–God chose to bequeath us with one more extraordinary privilege. He made us to be reflections of his glory (2 Corinthians 3:18).

God chose not to confine his grandeur to the throne room of heaven. He allows us to make his radiant image visible in the world, as we reflect his multi-faceted goodness. No other creature was given such honor.

King David experienced the wonder. He marveled that God made us just a little lower than the angels and—get this—crowned us with glory and honor (Psalm 8:5).

 

 

Think of it: The God of all glory who deserves all honor desires to share his magnificence in the world through us.

Just this week, I glimpsed the image of God as:

  • Steve thoughtfully brought me a cup of fresh coffee—as he often does.
  • Trelene kindly gave us a book she thought we’d enjoy.
  • Micki shared her wisdom.
  • Cheri offered a word of encouragement.
  • Four-year old Elena gifted us with a sample of her artwork—accompanied by hugs.

 

 

In such ways, God’s loving kindness, wisdom, inspiration, creativity, and affection are made visible. How dark our world would be without the sparkling splendor of God’s perfections reflected through his people.

So take note:

You are irreplaceable.

No one has your particular set of gifts, strengths and traits.

God designed you specifically

to achieve pre-designed purpose (Ephesians 2:10)—

just the way you are,

in the glorious image of God.

_________________________

 

What God-given attributes do you see among your family members? Where have you glimpsed the glorious image of God this week?

 

(Art & photo credits:  www.commons.wikimedia.org; http://www.en.wikipedia.org; http://www.mnn.com (Leonard Turner); http://www.mybible.com; http://www.pinterest.com; http://www.freestockphotos.biz.; http://www.pinterest.com; http://www.believers4ever.com; Nancy Ruegg.)

 

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Logic said his chances were slim to win the 400-meter race at the 1924 Olympics. After all:

  • Four hundred meters is a long sprint; he was a short sprinter.
  • Two other competitors in the race had achieved world records in this event.
  • He had been assigned the least desirable lane.

But when the starting gun fired, Eric Liddell quickly took the lead and pounded around the track at a steady pace—his head thrown back, arms pumping at his sides. Against the odds, Eric crossed the finish line first to win the gold medal. In fact, he set a new world record.

In the film, Chariots of Fire (1981), about Eric’s rise to Olympic gold, his character says, “God made me fast, and when I run, I feel his pleasure.” The scriptwriter was actually responsible for those words, but the attitude behind them surely reflected the strong faith-experience of the real Liddell.

 

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No doubt about it: Eric was gifted by God to run. And when he used that gift, Eric felt confident God was pleased, because he was fulfilling one of the purposes for which God had created him.

But those famous words from the film beg the question:

How can a person know when the invisible God experiences pleasure?

Scripture is the obvious place to begin our search for answers. In fact, the first book of the Bible—the first chapter no less—gives us indication. Seven times as God was creating the universe he “saw that it was good.” God takes pleasure in what he has made.

His pleasure is especially evident in the creation of humanity. He knit each of us together—not just bones, muscle, and organs—but personality traits, modes of intelligence, talents, interests, and more. Each of us is an incredible feat of engineering, a breath-taking masterpiece (Psalm 139:13, Ephesians 2:10). With so many variables at his disposal, God creates each person with precise uniqueness for distinct purposes.

 

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God also plans out each of our lives: the places where we’ll live, the people we’ll meet, the events we’ll experience (Psalm 139:16).

 

“God formed us for his pleasure…

and meant us to see him and live with him

and draw our life from his smile.”

A. W. Tozer

(The Pursuit of God, p. 32, emphasis added)

 

In Psalm 147, we’re told, “The Lord delights in those who fear* him, who put their hope in his unfailing love” (v. 11).

What might that delight or pleasure feel like to us?

Perhaps a warm contentment in the spirit—the way we feel when someone we respect smiles upon us with approval. Perhaps deep confidence as we live by his wisdom.

With God, such sublime moments are not necessarily random events.   We can be assured to experience God’s pleasure as we:

  • Take joy in his presence (Psalm 16:11) through worship—anytime, anywhere.
  • Radiate his joy to others. There is blessing in being a blessing.
  • Make right choices – especially the tough ones.

Eric Liddell surely sensed God’s pleasure as deep confidence when he made the tough choice not to run in his best event, the 100-meter, in the 1924 Olympics. The race was scheduled on a Sunday, and Eric took seriously God’s commandment to keep the Sabbath set apart for worship and rest.

 

quote-circumstances-may-appear-to-wreck-our-lives-and-god-s-plans-but-god-is-not-helpless-eric-liddell-58-33-94

 

When does God experience pleasure from our lives?

Consider Eric Liddell’s statement in the film, only let’s personalize it based on the way God has created each of us. Prayerfully fill in these blanks:

 

“God made me ____________. When I __________, I feel his pleasure.

 

One of my statements might read: “God made me a grandmother. When I play a rousing game of tag or hide ‘n’ seek with Elena and Sophie, I feel God’s pleasure.”

I’d love to hear your responses. Please share in the comment section below!

Meanwhile…

My mind cannot fathom the incredible privilege you have given us, Lord God. Thank you for ordaining the reciprocal process of pleasure between us: we enjoy bringing you delight, and you allow us to feel your pleasure. My mind cannot fathom it: I bring delight to the King of glory! I rejoice in you and praise you with all my heart.

 

———————————–

 

* “Fear of God” in the ancient Hebrew refers to awe, respect, and reverence for him.

 

Sources of information about Eric Liddell:

 

(Art & photo credits:  www.swordofthespirit.net; http://www.pinterest.com (2); http://www.azquotes.com.)

 

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