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Archive for October, 2020

(azquotes.com/quote/56292)

 

Churchill would have us understand:  truth is not determined by what we believe to be true. Truth is not relative.

Consider:  I can strongly believe that a coin tossed in a fountain will cause my wish to come true, or that a kind, friendly salesperson has my best interest at heart, or a sad, desperate plea for financial help is legitimate.

But such beliefs can result in misplaced trust and even trouble.  As we all know, there is no factual basis for believing in superstitions, or trusting every winsome person or assuming every heart-breaking story is true.

No, beliefs worth holding must be based on fact and reality.

On November 3, what we believe to be true will guide us to make critical choices— choices that will greatly impact the future of America.

 

 

Each of us needs to honestly assess:  Are my beliefs about each candidate based on verifiable fact and not just hearsay? 

We must also consider the essential matters facing our nation: bringing the country back to the pre-Covid prosperity of 2016-2019 (once the vaccination becomes available), ending the domestic terrorism in our cities, providing better alternatives for healthcare coverage, and lowering the national debt—to name a few.

Valid information about each of these concerns is paramount.  We must be alert to broad statements that include no facts, promises that include no plan, and accusations that include no proof.   

But gathering accurate evidence has become more difficult in recent years.  Some media outlets cannot be trusted to present facts.  Their long-term dissemination of misinformation has been exposed in recent months and most have offered no apology.  

Perhaps the answers to the following questions will lead to the wisest choices:

  • What kind of leader does our country/state/county need for this position?
  • What does each party’s platform uphold?  How do their beliefs and plans coincide with what scripture teaches?
  • What are the most pressing concerns? Which candidate addresses those concerns with realism, clarity, and insightful solutions?
  • Which party aligns with the truths I consider most important?
  • Which candidate has a proven, verifiable track record for addressing local, state, or national needs?

 


 

If you’re not sure how to answer those questions, may I recommend you ask for advice from people you highly respect, people who are knowledgeable about current events and have demonstrated wisdom in the life-choices they’ve made. Who are they voting for and why? What sources of news and information do they trust and why?

In addition:

  • Be responsible, cooperative, and supportive citizens, as the Apostle Paul laid out in Romans 13:1-7.

 

 

  • Be realistic about the outcome of this election. Our pastor pointed out in 2016 during that election season:  much as it may disappoint us, we don’t have to live in a Christian nation in order to thrive as Christians.   Throughout the centuries, the church has actually strengthened and grown under persecution.
  • Be prayerful–not only for which candidates to choose in the various races but for the welfare of our nation after the election.

 

 

Again, Paul offers wise advice:

 

 “I urge then, first of all,

that requests, prayers, intercession and

thanksgiving be made for everyone—

for kings and all those in authority

that we may live peaceful and quiet lives

in all godliness and holiness.

This is good and pleases God our Savior

who wants all men to be saved

and to come to knowledge of the truth.”

–1 Timothy 2:1-3 (NIV)

 

Art & photo credits:  http://www.flickr.com; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.pickpic.com.

 

(This post is a revision of the post for October 27, 2016.)

 

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“So what do you think?”  Kemmons Wilson asked his friend and fellow home-builder, Wallace Johnson.  After talking nonstop for the first twenty minutes of their business lunch, Kemmons finally took the first bite of his ham on rye.   It had taken that long to share his idea for a new business venture, and he wanted Wallace to be a partner.

Wallace set his napkin down beside an empty chili bowl.  He was already catching his friend’s passion for the idea that definitely held promise.

The revelation had occurred while Kemmons, his wife, and five children had recently been on vacation to Washington, D. C. that summer of 1951.  Every night of their trip they experienced frustration because of the poor accommodations available.

 

 

Most motels of the day offered small, uncomfortable rooms with nothing for children to do.  To add insult to injury, they charged extra for each child, nearly tripling the price of a room for the Wilson family. 

What Kemmons proposed to Wallace was a revolutionary kind of motel.  First, kids under twelve would stay free in their parents’ rooms.  He and Wallace would provide spacious 12 x 26 accommodations, including the bathroom. 

There’d be free TV, a telephone in each room, and a motel pool—at no extra charge.  Oh—and they’d provide babysitting service too.  They’d even build an onsite restaurant with good, reasonably-priced food.  No one was providing so many amenities at the time.

But Kemmons’ entrepreneurial genius did not stop there. 

“I’m not talking about just one motel here in Memphis,” he enthused between bites.  “We’ll start here, but think about this, Wallace.”  And a big grin spread over his face.  “What if we built them all across the country, within a day’s drive of each other?”

Now it was Wallace’s turn to grin.  “Nobody can say you don’t dream big, Kemmons.  That sounds fantastic.  But where do we get the capital for such a venture?”

“I thought about that too.  That’s where you come in, my friend, as my gifted finance man and officer in the National Homebuilders Association.  All we have to do is get one homebuilder in each major city to build one of our motels.”

Wallace made no promise that day except to pray about the possibility.  Kemmons fully supported his friend’s decision, being a man of strong faith in Jesus Christ himself.

But it wasn’t long before the two men immersed themselves in executing Kemmons’ plan.

The name for the would-be chain came from a movie the draftsman had seen during the time he worked on the plans.  He’d jokingly written the title at the top of the document:  Holiday Inn.

 

 

The first motel opened for business in 1953.  On each nightstand was a Bible, a tradition the two partners maintained over the ensuing decades of growth.

Wallace once explained, “The one reason why we’ve always had an open Bible in every room in the Holiday Inn motels is to help people find Jesus and the solution to their problems, no matter who they are” (1).   

By 1962, two Holiday Inns were opening each week. And today, they still remain an iconic sight along American highways and across the world.

Surely Kemmons and Wallace went to bed many a night, marveling at what God had done in their lives.  Both had grown up in dire circumstances, but escaped poverty with hard work and determination. 

Both experienced setbacks, but overcame them with faith and perseverance.  Wallace had once been fired from a good, stable job at a lumberyard and wondered what God was doing. 

But “later I saw it was God’s unerring and wondrous plan to get me into the ways of his choosing,” he explained (2).

Part of God’s plan included the 35-year partnership between Kemmons and Wallace, a partnership founded on their relationships with God and each other.  Together they gave liberally of their wealth to support numerous Christian ministries.

 

(Wallace Johnson (left) and Kemmons Wilson (right)

 

Some men and women who find great success in life are lulled into false security because of their financial standing and position.  Not Wallace Johnson.

“I am totally dependent on God for help in everything I do,” he emphasized.  “Otherwise I honestly believe I would start to fall apart in months” (3).

Such a statement reveals the foundation on which Kemmons and Wallace based their lives. Their decisions and actions grew out of a desire to honor God.

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

I thank you, Father, for such men as Kemmons Wilson and Wallace Johnson, who exemplified undying commitment to you in the midst of great success in the secular world.  In grateful response to your blessing upon them, they became conduits of blessing to others. May we do the same.        

 

Notes:

  1. Peter Kennedy, Copyright 2002, Devotional E-Mail DEVOTIONS IN ACTS, found @ www.sermonillustrator.com
  2. https://www.facebook.com/SMDP1/posts/bounce-back-abilityobstacles-don’t-have-to-stop-if-you-run-into-a-wall-don’t-t/701780540019915/
  3. Kennedy, DEVOTIONS IN ACTS, www.sermonillustrator.com

Other sources:

 

Art & photo credits:  http://www.flickr.com (3); http://www.fold3.com; http://www.canva.com.

 

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Sad Reba

 

She was a pitiful sight, the pit bull/Labrador/terrier that our son, Jeremy, and his wife, Nancy, adopted from the Humane Society.  Her head hung down, and her tail did not wag.  Even her eyes conveyed great sadness.  She never barked and did not know how to play.

Jeremy and Nancy decided to keep the name given her by the society staff:  Reba.  No use adding confusion to the poor dog’s problems.

When they first brought her home, Reba wouldn’t  eat.  She also suffered from anxiety, shaking uncontrollably when faced with uncertainty.  (She still does, sometimes.)

Reba’s symptoms aren’t much different from those of humans when we experience extreme stress.  Depression and anxiety can quickly take over.

Jeremy and Nancy adopted Reba the summer of 2010. That December when we saw Reba again, it was as if they had adopted a new dog.  Now her head was up and her tail wagged merrily.  She could run and jump to catch a tossed tennis ball in mid-air.

 

Happy Reba

 

If Reba could talk, she would undoubtedly have abhorrent stories to tell of her past.  But I have a feeling Reba would finish by saying, “My new life with Jeremy and Nancy is completely different.  I love it here!”

Reba has found a sanctuary—a place of refuge and protection where she feels safe.  Her life has been transformed.

We, too, have a sanctuary available to us (Psalm 9:9).

 

 

When David composed that psalm, the tabernacle tent-church was the sanctuary for the Israelites.  God had told Moses centuries before, “Have them make a sanctuary for me, and I will dwell among them” (Exodus 25:8).

For over fifteen hundred years, the tabernacle, and then the temple in Jerusalem, represented God’s presence among his people.

 

 

But that was only temporary.  God provided an even better way to be with his people, through his son, Jesus.

Those of us who know him now experience his sanctuary within. 

“Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God?  You are not your own; you were bought at a price” (1 Corinthians 6:19).

At the cost of his Son’s life, God bought us as his dwelling place.

We don’t have to go to Jerusalem.  We don’t even have to be in a church building to experience the sanctuary of our God.  His love, peace, and comfort are available wherever we are, whatever we’re facing.

Now that is life-transforming news. 

But I must avail myself of its truth.

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

Thank you, Heavenly Father, for being a sanctuary within me.  At any moment I can turn to you, and you are attentive to my cry.  As I focus on you—your wisdom, power, and benevolent care, my concerns deflate. 

I know you have a plan for my life, for those of my loved ones, for my country and the world. You are in control.  I imagine you taking hold of my hand, giving it a pat or two and reassuring me, “Don’t be afraid.  I will help you”.

You are incredibly good to me, O God, my refuge.  I reaffirm my trust in you.

 

(Psalm 34:15; Jeremiah 29:11; Psalm 9:7-8;

Isaiah 41:13; Nahum 1:7; Psalm 91:2.)

 

Photo & art credits:  Jeremy Ruegg, http://www.en.wikipedia.org; needpix.com.

 

Reblogged from 1-16-14.  I’m recovering from a reaction to a shingles vaccine, but on the mend.

 

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Five samples of red wine sat before the young man, each labeled with a price tag ranging from $5 to $45 a bottle. He tasted one, cleansed his palette with plain water, then tasted the next.

“Which one tastes better to you?” the researcher asked.

“Oh, definitely the $45 bottle,” responded the participant.

Most everyone who tried the wines agreed. The more expensive vintage was clearly superior. What they didn’t know: the wines labeled $5 and $45 came from the same bottle (1).

The preconceived idea that more expensive wines taste better had greatly influenced the participants. And it makes one wonder, what other preconceived ideas influence what we value?

 

 
Do we choose our clothing based on the logo? Are we more likely to accept certain invitations based on the importance of the host? Do we take great interest in the rich and famous?

In today’s world, people value:

  • Influence, power and authority, little realizing its downward pull. “Power intoxicates men,” asserted James F. Byrnes. “When a man is intoxicated by alcohol, he can recover, but when intoxicated by power he seldom recovers.”
  • Self-reliance, assertiveness and drive. Charles W. Eliot isn’t the only one who’s believed “the efficient man is the man who thinks for himself.” But that discounts the value of knowledge, wisdom, and creativity of others–including God’s.

 

 

  • Wealth and material possessions. By contrast, St. Augustine would have us “soar above our worldly possessions. The bee does not need its wings less when it has gathered an abundant store; for if it sinks in the honey it dies.”
  • Fame and privilege. But “what is Fortune, what is Fame? Futile gold and phantom name—Riches buried in a cave, Glory written on a grave” (Henry Van Dyke, “The Talisman”).
  • Physical attractiveness. “The most highly respected and valued attribute in our culture is physical attractiveness, “ wrote Dr. James Dobson (2). But of course beauty fades over time. What then?

 

 
It’s all chasing after the wind.
 

“Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player,

that struts and frets his hour upon the stage,

and then is heard no more;

it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,

signifying nothing.”

–William Shakespeare, Macbeth

 
And yet, if you exhibit at least several of the elements listed in bold print above, you are deemed successful in this world—even though those who reach the pinnacle of such success often experience loneliness, boredom, and dissatisfaction.  What kind of prosperity is that?

Still, men and women through the ages have been fooled into believing that pursuit of these values will bring happiness–in spite of overwhelming evidence to the contrary.
 

 
Praise God he offers a better, truly fulfilling way to live. And since he made us, he knows exactly what will satisfy.

To an outside observer, the values of his kingdom must appear upside down. Note how opposite they are from the world’s values listed above:

  • reliance upon him (Proverbs 3:5-6)

 

 

  • humility (James 4:6)

 

 

  • generosity (2 Corinthians 9:7)

 

 

  • a servant’s heart (John 12:26)

 

 

  • inner beauty based on character (1 Peter 3:3-4)

 

 
These are the qualities that provide a solid foundation for wise choices.  And it’s wise choices that contribute to peace, contentment, and fulfillment.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     * 

Lord God, I know the world’s ways lead to futility, yet I can still be drawn in by the lies. Give me strength to choose your way and make wise choices based on your Word. May I be mindful how blessed are those who are hungry and thirsty for righteousness, because it is they who will be satisfied. I praise and thank you for the full satisfaction you freely give!

Ephesians 4:17-24; James 1:5; Matthew 5:6 ISV

  

 

Notes:

  1. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080126101053.htm
  2. https://www.drjamesdobson.org/blogs/dr-dobson-blog/dr-dobson-blog/2018/10/15/sources-of-self-esteem-in-children-part-1-society’s-infatuation-with-beauty

Photo credits:  http://www.pixabay.com’ http://www.pxhere.com (2); http://www.pixnic.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.dailyverses.net (2).

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