Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January, 2016

A Bit of Nan-Sense for 1-28-16:

 

IMG_0415

 

My son and daughter-in-law gave me a lovely, cloth-bound journal for my birthday. I decided to record favorite scripture verses, perhaps one or two for each book of the Bible, then meditate on the meaning, and record how the truths have played out in my life.

One of the first entries included Exodus 14:13-14, when the Israelites had just escaped slavery in Egypt only to come up against the Red Sea. To make matters worse, Pharaoh’s army was in fierce pursuit. The people were terrified, desperately wishing they’d stayed in Egypt.

Moses said, “Do not be afraid. Stand firm and you will see the deliverance the Lord will bring you today…The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still.”

True to his word, God did miraculously rescue them.

Notes to self, in response:

Time and again God has proven to me his trustworthiness and demonstrated his loving care. My blessings journal with over 1000 entries thus far provides ample proof.

In addition, Scripture abounds with promises that give me hope during difficult times. I know that God specializes in bringing beauty out of ashes (Isaiah 61:3). And though deliverance may not come as soon as I’d like or in the way I expect, I know God will see me through.

With those words, “be still” (at least in this context) God was not suggesting total inactivity. After all, the Israelites did have to walk through the Red Sea to the other side. It appears God was urging them to be still of heart – to cease the negativity, consternation, and fretting.

That’s my part in God’s provision, too:  stillness of heart.

And how do I achieve that?

A mind is kept stilled in peace by staying focused on Almighty God (Isaiah 26:3).

 

(Does that make sense to you, too? Share your thoughts below!)

 

Photo:  Nancy Ruegg

Read Full Post »

One custom of our church community includes the babies and toddlers. Toward the end of the worship service, many parents collect their little ones and bring them to the sanctuary for the closing praise songs.

When our two-year old granddaughter, Elena, arrives, she starts out in Mommy’s arms, then clambers to Daddy, then over to Papa (my husband, Steve), and finally to Nana—that’s me.

Last Sunday she was particularly affectionate—arms around my neck, head nestled on my shoulder. Every now and then she’d lift her head to give me a kiss on the cheek.   I held her close and kissed her silken hair.

IMG_0172

(Who could resist snuggling with this?!)

 

Please understand: Elena is a typical toddler. She knows what she wants and when she wants it (usually NOW!). Her expressive cries can be quite vociferous.   But those traits of stubbornness and impatience—seen in most toddlers–don’t diminish my love for her. Not a bit.

I reveled in that moment of tenderness at church, while swaying to the music and singing of our love for God. In my mind’s eye, I saw myself as the child, held in the close embrace of my Father, who lovingly forgives my sins and casts them as far as the east is from the west.

What an astounding privilege he grants us—to participate in close, familial communion with him, the King of the Universe!

Day in and day out our glorious and powerful God draws near to us:

 

big_thumb_b8e3ad8d855043f095b0024ab5f33ecc

 

  • Through creation. Just this morning, he draped pink cloud-ribbons across a crystalline sky, turning our minds to him and his infinite genius. Almighty God orchestrates every intricate aspect of life on our planet, yet we can know him as our gracious and compassionate Father.
  • Through his Word. Just this week I had occasion to study the word, abide, found in John 14:6. “And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever” (KJV). First I looked up the word in the dictionary, and discovered abide means much more than just being with someone. Abide also includes persevering under (!) and tolerating (!), in addition to remaining in one place, to continue or endure.   I had to smile at the tongue-in-cheek humor. And I prayed, “Oh, Lord, thank you for loving me that much!
  • Through people. A young woman at our new church has been enthusiastically friendly.   And though I’ve told her I appreciate her kindness, I doubt she can fully understand how her interest, hugs, and effervescence have ministered to me. God draws near with his joy each time we meet.
  • Through circumstances.  Hugs and kisses from a toddler are just one precious example that makes me mindful of God’s love for me.

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

Oh, Father, I shake my head in wonder to think

You long for us to be your familial friends.

I praise you for your abundant, gracious love,

Motivating you to reveal yourself

Through creation,

People, circumstances,

Your word, and more.

In fact, you are intimately involved

In every moment of our lives.

Thank you for blessing us

With your abiding presence,

Even though it requires of you

Great tolerance and perseverance!

We cling to you, our Source of

Strength, wisdom, and provision.

You are with us and in us,

Always drawing us closer to you.

Thank you for never giving up

And never letting go.

 

(2 Corinthians 6:16, 18; Psalm 103:8; Psalm 19:1-4;

Matthew 5:14, 16; Psalm 92:4; 2 Timothy 3:16-17;

Psalm 139:1-5; Zephaniah 3:17; James 1:17;

Isaiah 41:10; 1 Corinthians 3:16; James 4:8;

Philippians 1:6; John 10:28.)

(Photo credits:  Nancy Ruegg, and http://www.wallpaperup.com.)

Read Full Post »

“The whole meaning of history is in the proof that there have lived people before the present time whom it is important to meet” (Eugene Rosenstock Huessey, Speech and Reality, p. 167).

The forefathers of our nation are among them…

 

John_Hancock_1770-crop

 

(January 23, 1737-October 8, 1793)

 

For John Hancock, it was the last straw.

The Stamp Act of 1765 was bad enough, requiring printed materials in America to carry a special stamp, and the obligatory fees sent to England. In the 160-year history of the colonies, Americans had only paid taxes to their colonial governments.

And although the Stamp Act had been repealed, it was replaced with a more detrimental decree: The Declaratory Act of 1766, which proclaimed Britain’s absolute authority over the American colonies.

Then came the Townshend Revenue Acts of 1767, taxing the colonists further.

No wonder they took up the cry, “No taxation without representation.”

Now it was 1768. Customs officials had just confiscated John Hancock’s sloop, Liberty, in the Boston Harbor. They claimed it was being used to transport contraband goods.

And that was the last straw. Hancock had reached the end of his tolerance for sovereign British rule. He and politician, Samuel Adams began orchestrating demonstrations and rallies. They also spread the ideal of liberty to other locales.

Meanwhile, British reinforcements were sent to Boston—an occupation that would last eight years.

 

t25-Ft-c1770s-Lawson-ASKB-Lawson-ASKB

 

In 1770, British soldiers shot into an unarmed crowd, killing five Bostonians and wounding others. The horrific event became known as the Boston Massacre.

For a number of years, that day, March 5, was memorialized in the city. Hancock was asked to speak in 1774. In his speech he said:

“Let us humbly commit our righteous cause to the great Lord of the Universe (Psalm 37:5), who loveth righteousness and hateth iniquity (Hebrews 1:9)…Let us joyfully leave our concerns in the hands of Him Who raiseth up and pulleth down the empires and kingdoms of the world as He pleases (Daniel 2:21).”

Then he quoted Habakkuk 3:17-18, reminding Bostonians that no matter what happened as the conflict continued, or how desperate circumstances might become, “yet we will rejoice in the Lord” (1).

So many scriptures brought together in one brief paragraph give indication of the strong Christian faith John Hancock embraced.

Also in the early 1770s, Hancock, Adams, and several dozen others “hosted” the Boston Tea Party. They dumped 342 chests of tea into the harbor rather than pay import duties to Britain.

 

The Boston Tea Party, 1773 Painting; The Boston Tea Party, 1773 Art Print for sale

 

In 1774, Hancock and Adams were elected to the Provincial Congress at Concord, Massachusetts. John was elected president and presided over the Committee of Safety. He and others organized the minutemen, colonial militia who could be ready in a minute to oppose the British.

April 19, 1775, seven hundred British soldiers were sent to Concord to confiscate military supplies and capture Hancock and Adams. Thanks to the warning of Paul Revere, the two men were able to escape.

At nearby Lexington, British soldiers and minutemen engaged in a skirmish, and the Revolutionary War began with the “shot heard round the world.”

Just four days before, John Hancock had written:

“All confidence must be withheld from the means we use; and reposed only on that GOD who rules in the armies of heaven, and without whose blessing, the best human counsels are but foolishness—and all created power vanity (2)”.

Hancock knew that all their efforts toward freedom were in vain if God was not on their side.

That summer he represented Massachusetts at the Continental Congress held in Philadelphia, to discuss ways of restoring harmony with Britain, yet establish rights and liberties for the colonists. Independence wasn’t on the table – yet.

 

continental-congress-hero-H

 

But 1776 brought Thomas Paine’s famous pamphlet, “Common Sense.” American patriotism grew strong, and Congress passed a resolution calling on “the aid of God in the moral cause for independence.” They encouraged fasting and prayer throughout the colonies, and “through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, obtain his pardon and forgiveness” (3).

That’s how deep and wide the Christian faith permeated American society.

Of course, the most important resolution of the Continental Congress, under Hancock’s presidency, was the Declaration of Independence, severing all ties to Britain. And, as most U.S. history students know, he was the first to sign in his distinctive script.

 

John-Hancock-dreamstime1

 

For almost two and a half years, Hancock tirelessly presided over the Congress, as the war escalated, and the delegates hammered out the first constitution, the Articles of Confederation.

At least four times they had to flee for their lives to other colonies in order to continue their work. In addition, long debates and political rifts took their toll on the delegates, including John Hancock. He also suffered from gout.

When Congress had completed the Articles, Hancock resigned the presidency, but continued public service in Massachusetts, assisting in the formation of the state constitution (4). He and other delegates included this requirement:

“Any person chosen governor, lieutenant governor, counselor, senator, or representative…shall…make and subscribe the following declaration: ‘I, ______________, do declare that I believe the Christian religion and have a firm persuasion of its truth” (5).

I wonder what our institutions of government would look like today if that affirmation were still required.

John Hancock, first governor of Massachusetts, became one of the first to sign that statement of faith. He served eleven years before his death in 1793, at age fifty-five.

Revisionists want to remove from the historical record any mention of God, Jesus, Christianity, and the Bible. But Hancock and many other founding fathers knew: “Without God’s blessing, the best human counsels are but foolishness.”

We had better know that, too.

 

Citations and Notes:

  1. The Founders’ Bible, p. 1374
  2. faithofourfathers.net
  3. johnhancock.org
  4. The only constitution in the world still in use today and older than the U. S. Constitution
  5. The Founders’ Bible, p. 2097

Sources:

  1. acheritagegroup.org
  2. biography.com
  3. The Founders’ Bible
  4. faithofourfathers.net
  5. johnhancock.org
  6. ushistory.org

Art & photo credits:  www.wikipedia.org; http://www.allthingsliberty.com; http://www.paintingandframe.com; http://www.history.com; http://www.plannersweb.com.

Read Full Post »

Jacob half-walked, half-jogged mile after mile toward Paddan Aram, to escape his furious brother, Esau. (You can read about the circumstances of Esau’s anger in Genesis 27-28.)

Finally, at sunset, Jacob had to stop and rest. In a grassy meadow surrounded by trees, he spotted a low, flat rock, perfect for a pillow. He folded his sash into a smooth bundle, to add a bit of softness under his head, then wrapped himself in his outer robe, and promptly fell asleep.

That may be the impression we’ve acquired from such art work as this:

 

jacob

 

The truth is, the area where Jacob rested that first night as a runaway, was far from pleasant. The landscape was scrubby, rocky, and desolate, which surely accentuated how very alone he was.

I doubt that Jacob rested comfortably or fell asleep quickly.   For all he knew, Esau was in hot pursuit. And though Jacob was headed to the ancestral home of his mother, it’s doubtful he’d ever met any of those relatives. What would they be like? How would he be treated? Between the uncomfortable “bed,” and the worrying and wondering, who could rest?

But Jacob had covered many miles that day. Exhaustion finally took over, and he slept—soundly enough to dream.

You know the story.  Jacob was witness to a glorious sight: angels of God, ascending and descending on a stairway that reached all the way to heaven.

At the top of the stairway stood God Almighty himself, proclaiming glorious promises to Jacob:

  • The land on which he lay would one day be his.
  • His descendants would be as numerous as the dust on the earth.
  • All the peoples of the earth would be blessed through Jacob and his offspring.
  • God would be with him to watch over him wherever he went.

Jacob awoke, astonished by his dream. Perhaps he was a bit disoriented by the darkness and desolation, when just a moment before he was surrounded by ethereal light, gazing at angels on a glowing staircase, and listening to the voice of God.

“The Lord is in this place!” he breathed.

Jacob took the stone pillow and stood it up on end as a pillar-reminder of the momentous occasion. And he renamed the location, Bethel, which means house of God (Genesis 28:10-19).

 

Jacob_set_up_stone_C-175

 

We may not be runaways like Jacob, forced to sleep in a wilderness. But we’ve all faced rough, rock-strewn places in life when:

  • Marriage is more disappointment than delight,
  • The growing pains of our children become our pain, too,
  • Friends prove unfriendly,
  • Circumstances turn our lives upside down,
  • The day-to-day routine is unpleasant and boring.

Amidst the desolation and darkness we forget:

God. Is. With Us.

And that is huge.

 

51RKiHO4XNL

 

 “God’s presence with us is his greatest present to us” (Joanie Yoder).

 The problem is, we’re often unaware just as Jacob was.

But we do have numerous assurances of God’s presence with us throughout scripture, and indications of what a sublime treasure that is:

  • Hundreds of promises in the Bible. (Jacob received only five that night at Bethel!)
  • All of God’s incredible attributes at work in and around us: his power, wisdom, loving kindness, and much more
  • His guidance, provision, protection, and empowerment–whether we currently see the evidence or not
  • His blessings, even in the desolate places of life

May we awaken to full awareness and the full meaning of his presence, because:

 

bestofallgodiswithus-wesley1

(The best of all is, God is with us–John Wesley.)

 

(Art credits:  www.keyway.ca; http://www.bibleencyclopedia.com; http://www.amazon.com; http://www.izquotes.com.)

 

Read Full Post »

(A new folk tale)

It was toward sundown when William the Potter shuffled into his humble cottage and shut the door using a little more force than necessary. With several grunts he peeled off his jacket and scarf. And once his outer clothing was hung on the hook beside the door, he heaved a great sigh.

His wife, Katherine, turned briefly from stirring the pot of stew that was simmering over the hearth fire.

daggett-house-main-room-2-fireplace-cooking

“Welcome home, William,” she remarked with a speck of sarcasm.

William didn’t notice her tone, as he was too wrapped up in his own gloomy thoughts.

“What’s wrong, dear?” she asked, then returned to the task at hand: scraping the sides of the stew pot so no bits would be burnt and wasted.

William wearily sat down at the rough-hewn table and began working off his heavy boots.

“I’m so tired, Katherine—tired of working with dreary, dusty clay all day, tired of making the same plain, serviceable containers—jug after ordinary jug. Pot after ordinary pot. Hour after agonizing hour.”

wheel-throwing-hands-on-clay1

One boot landed with a thump on the pine floor.

“So make something fanciful every now and then,” Katherine countered.

“But it’s the everyday pots, jugs and bowls that people buy.”

The second boot clumped beside the first.

“Oh, William, I am sorry. You must remember that your work is important. Without your pottery, how would the village store their water and grain, plant their herbs and flowers, or…serve their supper?” And Katherine placed in front of him one of his clay bowls, filled with savory stew.

“M-m-m,” responded William. “In my mind I know you are right, but my heart is no longer in it.”

The next day toward sundown, William again entered the cottage and shut the door with extra force. But this time, he didn’t even take off his coat and scarf before grabbing Katherine around the waist and swinging her in a tight circle, careful to avoid the table and fire.

“Katherine! Katherine!” he bellowed. “Such good news I have to tell you!”

She pushed against his shoulders. “William! For goodness’ sake, put me down! Whatever has gotten into you?”

“Oh, my dear, you will never guess my good fortune.  Sit down while I tell you!”

Katherine wiped her hands on her apron before smoothing her skirts and taking a chair. Then clasping her hands as if to pray, Katherine sat ready to hear about this turn of events.

William drew a big breath and began.

“This afternoon I received a visitor at the shop—a visitor from the castle. The castle, I tell you! He says the king desires a new border for his gardens, a border of boxwoods in large pots. He’ll need dozens of pots, and he’s asked me to help!  Isn’t that wondrous news?”  And William looked to Katherine expectantly for her enthusiastic response.

topiary-124766055_0

Katherine paused for a moment before speaking. “Pots, you say.”

“Yes!” he replied.

“Like the pots you make for the village?” she inquired.

“The same! The king’s messenger even pointed to the ones lined up on the shelf and said they would do perfectly, except much larger, of course.  Oh, think of the honor this is, Katherine.

“Yes, dear. Quite an honor. It’s just that…well…i-it seems to me…” Katherine stammered. And finally she spoke the obvious. “You’ll still be making ordinary pots, am I correct?  Wasn’t it just yesterday you were bemoaning the very same task?”

“Ah, but starting tomorrow, I am working for the king,” William exclaimed. “These pots will be part of something glorious and enduring. And that changes everything!”

*     *     *     *     *

“Whatever you do,

work at it with all your heart,

as working for the Lord,

not for men…

It is the Lord Christ you are serving.”

–Colossians 3:23-24

(Photo credits:  www.goodlifelist.com; http://www.arteast.org; http://www.bloomiq.com.)

Read Full Post »

 

From the backseat of my grandparents’ car, I strained to catch my first glimpse of the Smokey Mountains. The day before the three of us had left home in Aurora, Illinois and were on our way to Conyers, Georgia to visit friends of theirs.

 

hqdefault

(We traveled in style, in Grandpa’s 1950-something turquoise Studebaker.)

 

What an adventure for a six-year old.  Up until that time, I’d only visited one other state, neighboring Indiana.

Grandma had told me that mountains were like hills, only much, much taller. And instead of being a single mound (like the rise we sledded on in the wintertime), they were lined up one after another.

My imagination could hardly conjure a picture of such a phenomenon.

That second day of our trip, as we rounded the top of yet another hill in Tennessee, my straining paid off. Far in the distance we caught sight of mountain tops. Each rise thereafter afforded another spectacular view, always a bit closer to the peaks, and even more mesmerizing than the last. My breaths came in startled gasps. Never had I seen such magnificence…

 

smoky-mountains-in-the

 

Smokies-cades-cove

 

…until, at age fifteen, when I traveled to Colorado for a week at Young Life’s Frontier Ranch. The soaring, steep cliffs of the Rockies dwarfed the more rounded Smokies.

 

nevers12

 

Ah, but then came the semester-long, short-term missionary adventure in Quito, Ecuador, a city nestled in the Andes Mountains at 10,000 feet. Thirty miles to the south, Cotopaxi towers over the city, at 19,000 feet above sea level.  Again, my breath was taken away.

 

Quito volcanico141121g

 

“Mountains are earth’s undying monuments,” said Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Indeed, they do stand tribute to their Maker, ancient testimonials to God’s awe-inspiring, creative power.

They also provide a meaningful metaphor, because certain adjectives we use to describe mountains, also describe Him:

 

  • High

d10a87c019aedde4d2cd45602f98714f

(“Lead me to the rock that is higher than I.” — Psalm 61:2)

  • Firm

“God’s solid foundation

stands firm.”

–2 Timothy 2:19a

  • Strong

 

edee1af2af37a19a86f447ab0f87af17

(“O LORD God of Heaven’s Armies!

Where is there anyone as mighty as you, O LORD?

You are entirely faithful.” –Psalm 89:8, NLT)

  • Immoveable

“I the Lord do not change.”

–Malachi 3:6a

  • Eternal

 

43e033b5445c40029b82903ba9f3031d

(“The eternal God is your refuge.” — Deuteronomy 33:27a)

 

One of the psalmists, perhaps King Hezekiah, wrote:

“As the mountains surround Jerusalem,

so the Lord surrounds his people

both now and forevermore.”

–Psalm 125:2

(Emphasis added)

 

Imagine yourself surrounded by high, strong and secure mountains.

Are they likely to crumble? No. Neither will your Almighty God fall to pieces, succumbing to the pressure of insurmountable problems.  It can’t happen!

Do mountains change with every passing breeze? No.  Neither can your Lord be shaken.

Are you easily accessible when surrounded by mountains? No. You are protected. Mountains can even act as barriers against stormy weather. Similarly God shelters you from the full brunt of the storms of life.

And what is your view from this protected valley? Your eyes are drawn upward toward peaks and sky, indicative of the appropriate response when we’re facing difficulty:

 

Glacier_park1

 

Look up to the Maker of mountains

and Provider of refuge.

His righteousness is like the mighty mountains.

He surrounds us with his favor and loving kindness,

encircles us in his everlasting arms of love,

and guards us by his providence on all sides.

Hallelujah!

(Psalm 36:6; Psalm 32:10; Deuteronomy 33:27; Psalm 32:7).

(Art & photo credits:  www.youtube.com; http://www.tripadvisor.com; http://www.gatlinburg.com; http://www.mountainlake.com; http://www.cotopaxinoticias.com; http://www.pinterest.com (3), http://www.wikipedia.org.)

Read Full Post »

psalm-90-12-230-130

“Teach us to number our days,

that we may present to you

a heart of wisdom”

–Psalm 90:12 (NAS)

 

I did the math and numbered my days: over 24,000 so far. That means I’m well past the half-way point of the average earthly life. And such a sobering thought would surely weigh heavy on my mind, if I did not have heaven to look forward to.

But I’m certain Moses (the author of Psalm 90, above) wasn’t asking God for a multiplication lesson.

Perhaps in learning how to number his days Moses wanted to: 

  • make each day count by accomplishing worthwhile tasks, or
  • live mindfully so steady growth and learning took place, or
  • dedicate himself to the well-being of others, or
  • look for God throughout each day, worshiping and praising, or
  • revel in the positive instead of grovel in the negative.

Perhaps Moses was thinking of all those things.

According to two commentators, Numbering our days means:  1) living in such a way that each day has value, and 2) living intentionally in ways that bring glory to God and blessing to others.

Then notice what Moses indicates will happen when we live with those supreme purposes:

We’ll be able to present to God a heart of wisdom—a heart with “the ability to see life from God’s perspective, and then to know the best course of action to take” (p. 1055, Living Application Bible). 

That seems to me a lovely gift to present to my Heavenly Father—accepting his perspective and acting upon it.

 

Charles-Spurgeon-Quote-Wisdom

 

But learning to number our days and grow in wisdom are such abstract processes. It’s difficult to determine progress. So how might we know that we’re learning and growing? These ten questions may help; they’re based on the Book of Wisdom, Proverbs. Try answering in the context of the last ten—maybe even twenty—years:

  1. Am I more aware of God’s daily gifts and more grateful to him for these blessings (15:13)?
  2. Do my thoughts frequently turn to God during the day? Am I continually turning to him for guidance? (2:1-6)
  3. Do I express trust in God more often than worry about circumstances (3:5-6)?
  4. Am I pursuing biblical instruction (8:33-34a)?
  5. Do I take great pleasure in building up others (10:11)?
  6. Am I able to think before I speak (10:19b)?
  7. Do I give people the benefit of the doubt (19:11)?
  8. Am I becoming more patient and kind–especially toward challenging people (25:21-22)?
  9. Do I thoughtfully consider the advice of those who are knowledgeable and wise (19:20)?
  10. Am I able to do what’s right even when there’s no one around to notice (10:9)?

 

a0ea4e208506c36a35ddbfffcd0cd872

 

Scripture tells us that when Abraham died, he was “satisfied with life” (Genesis 25:8, NAS).  Surely satisfaction with life includes the development of a heart of wisdom, which Abraham demonstrated by his life of faith–in spite of challenges, disappointments, and uncertainties.

But the pinnacle of satisfaction must have been presenting that heart of wisdom to God Almighty on the day he entered heaven’s gates.

My prayer is that I’ll be able to do the same.

You, too?

“What we weave in time

is what we’ll wear in eternity.”

– Mart DeHaan

 

(Photo and art credits:  www.faithgateway.com; http://www.quotesgram.com; http://www.pinterest.com.)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Laurie Klein, Scribe

immerse in God, emerge refreshed

Strength Renewed

But those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary; they will walk and not be faint. Isaiah 40:31

Colleen Scheid

Writing, Acting, Living the Grace of God

Walking Well With God

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Shelly Miller

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Mitch Teemley

The Power of Story

Faith Barista

Because some days you need a double-shot of faith.

Rebeca Jones

Building Standing Stones

Wings of the Dawn

even there Your hand will lead me ~ poems and reflections by Heidi Viars

Jennifer Dukes Lee

Storyteller. Grace Dweller.

Holley Gerth

Live fully * Love Bravely

Unshakable Hope

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you will abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Romans 15:13)

Healthy Spirituality

Nurturing Hearts Closer to God

Just Wondering

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Jody Lee Collins

Impressions Becoming Expressions

(in)courage

Impressions Becoming Expressions