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Posts Tagged ‘Wisdom’

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“Teach us to number our days,

that we may present to you

a heart of wisdom”

–Psalm 90:12 (NAS)

 

I did the math and numbered my days: over 24,000 so far. That means I’m well past the half-way point of the average earthly life. And such a sobering thought would surely weigh heavy on my mind, if I did not have heaven to look forward to.

But I’m certain Moses (the author of Psalm 90, above) wasn’t asking God for a multiplication lesson.

Perhaps in learning how to number his days Moses wanted to: 

  • make each day count by accomplishing worthwhile tasks, or
  • live mindfully so steady growth and learning took place, or
  • dedicate himself to the well-being of others, or
  • look for God throughout each day, worshiping and praising, or
  • revel in the positive instead of grovel in the negative.

Perhaps Moses was thinking of all those things.

According to two commentators, Numbering our days means:  1) living in such a way that each day has value, and 2) living intentionally in ways that bring glory to God and blessing to others.

Then notice what Moses indicates will happen when we live with those supreme purposes:

We’ll be able to present to God a heart of wisdom—a heart with “the ability to see life from God’s perspective, and then to know the best course of action to take” (p. 1055, Living Application Bible). 

That seems to me a lovely gift to present to my Heavenly Father—accepting his perspective and acting upon it.

 

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But learning to number our days and grow in wisdom are such abstract processes. It’s difficult to determine progress. So how might we know that we’re learning and growing? These ten questions may help; they’re based on the Book of Wisdom, Proverbs. Try answering in the context of the last ten—maybe even twenty—years:

  1. Am I more aware of God’s daily gifts and more grateful to him for these blessings (15:13)?
  2. Do my thoughts frequently turn to God during the day? Am I continually turning to him for guidance? (2:1-6)
  3. Do I express trust in God more often than worry about circumstances (3:5-6)?
  4. Am I pursuing biblical instruction (8:33-34a)?
  5. Do I take great pleasure in building up others (10:11)?
  6. Am I able to think before I speak (10:19b)?
  7. Do I give people the benefit of the doubt (19:11)?
  8. Am I becoming more patient and kind–especially toward challenging people (25:21-22)?
  9. Do I thoughtfully consider the advice of those who are knowledgeable and wise (19:20)?
  10. Am I able to do what’s right even when there’s no one around to notice (10:9)?

 

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Scripture tells us that when Abraham died, he was “satisfied with life” (Genesis 25:8, NAS).  Surely satisfaction with life includes the development of a heart of wisdom, which Abraham demonstrated by his life of faith–in spite of challenges, disappointments, and uncertainties.

But the pinnacle of satisfaction must have been presenting that heart of wisdom to God Almighty on the day he entered heaven’s gates.

My prayer is that I’ll be able to do the same.

You, too?

“What we weave in time

is what we’ll wear in eternity.”

– Mart DeHaan

 

(Photo and art credits:  www.faithgateway.com; http://www.quotesgram.com; http://www.pinterest.com.)

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 “By myself!” “By myself!” “By myself!” Numerous times each day our granddaughter asserts herself, announcing with much gusto that whatever the task, she can handle it.

But Elena just turned two. Although her confidence is high, skills are limited. When it’s time to go upstairs, “by myself” means down on all fours, one limb at a time. One hand up, and then the other. One foot up and then the other. It is a slow and laborious process.

In addition, the grown-up in her wake must be very sly about offering support. No hand on the back, or even hovering where Elena can see it. She’ll cast aside such safety precautions and announce firmly once again, “By myself!”

Child Washing Hands

Hand washing is another activity she prefers to do independently. But her attempts to pump out a dollop of liquid soap often end unsuccessfully. The soap usually lands in or around the sink—not in her hand.

And once the soap is in her palm, Elena reaches for the faucet. Forget the actual washing. If we try to help, she pulls her hands away. “By myself!” Even when she acquiesces, her scrubbing efforts leave much to be desired. Squeezing is her version.

And rinsing is another issue. “By myself” often results in enthusiastic splattering of water on dry dishes, counter, and backsplash.

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Mealtimes offer more opportunities for autonomy. “By myself” means she will hold her spoon or fork as she chooses, not as the grown-ups have shown her numerous times. Elena has yet to figure out that holding a utensil at the very end of the handle is not very efficient.  (The child in the photo is not our Elena, but is demonstrating the same technique.)

Because of her unwieldy grip, Elena ends up turning the spoon upside down as it approaches her mouth. Needless to say, most of the food ends up on her chin, in her bib pocket, on her clothes, on the tray, or back in the dish.

We shake our heads and roll our eyes. Toddlers!

Then it dawns on me. Sometimes I’m not much more mature than a toddler in God’s family. I’ve been known to proclaim “by myself,” too:

  • “Yes, Lord, I need you to take care of the important matters, but I can handle the small stuff by myself. ”
  • “I’ll make this decision by myself, Lord, because—to be honest–I’m not sure I’ll like your choice.”
  • “I can decide by myself what will make me happy, Lord.”

Yep, I can be as foolish as a toddler, even though great wisdom is available to me.

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Wisdom such as:

“Start with God.

The first step in learning

is bowing down to God.

Only fools thumb their noses

at such wisdom and learning”

(Proverbs 1:7, MSG).

Ouch. But Solomon is right.  God made me; he knows the best course for me. Over and over again he has proven himself worthy of my trust — guiding my way, providing for my needs, empowering me to accomplish his plans.

If I can’t trust the One who died for me, who can I trust?

Any time I’m tempted to approach a situation or decision by myself, I need to remember:

“God always gives the best

to those who leave the choice to him”

–Selwyn Hughes

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Oh, Father, forgive me for the times I have foolishly asserted my independence. Help me to relinquish control to you. I’ve lived long enough to know from experience that living life by myself does not result in satisfaction. Help me become a person who turns to you first, and asks, “What do YOU want me to do, Lord?” because you are the all-wise One of the universe.  And I know the benefits of following you will far outweigh any costs.

(Photo credits:  www.motherhood.modernmom.com; http://www.childcare.oxfordcounty.ca; http://www.cleftstories.com; http://www.covedevotions2010.blogspot.com.)

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 (Photo from http://www.trulia.com.)

“There it is, Mom, “ Steve remarked, as he pointed to a little white house in the middle of a city block. “That’s where we lived when I was growing up.”

“Oh, yes,” she replied. But did Mom really remember?

We were on an excursion through Columbus, Ohio, taking Steve’s mother past the landmarks of her life. Alzheimer’s disease had already stolen away much of her vibrancy and warmth, and, of course, her memory.

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Steve drove by West High School and continued his commentary. “That’s where we all went to school, you, Dad, Karen, and me. You were the very first homecoming queen.  How about that?  No wonder Dad asked you out.”

She murmured assent to Steve’s comments, but added nothing of her own.

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We drove past the brick ranch they built out in the country in 1966. Horses used to reside beyond the back fence. Just a few houses had dotted the area back then. By this time, however, they had been swallowed up by dozens more. The saplings Mom and Dad had planted were now tall shade trees.  And the glorious flower beds and window boxes that Mom had tended were gone. She registered no recollection.

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But when we approached her childhood home, a white Dutch Colonial on a quiet street, all of a sudden she perked up.  Pointing to a second-story window, Mom stated firmly, “That was my room, right up there.”

In the midst of the fog that is Alzheimer’s, one memory–one glimmer of light–shone through that morning. Steve and I almost gasped at the wonder of the moment. Mom remembered!

And the rarity of her memories pointed to the preciousness of this ability. Memory is a gift to be treasured. The older I grow, the more I appreciate the miraculous power of the brain to store millions of memories—with astounding detail–and yet access a particular one in a mille-second.

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Not only do sights trigger memories, but also smells. Researchers say this sense is the most powerful memory-inducer. For me, the aroma of fresh-baked bread always takes me back to my grandmother’s kitchen.

Sounds trigger memories as well—particularly music. Tastes and textures work the same phenomenon.

But surely God had more purpose in mind for giving us memory than the pleasant pastime of reminiscing.

Indeed.

Memories foster gratitude, as we contemplate God’s goodness to us in the past:

  • His countless blessings (even when we haven’t been a blessing to him).
  • Those times he led us through the shadow of death, so that we might experience more completely the glory of his light.
  • Moments when we almost gave up hope, and God surprised us with his creative, abundant provision.
  • Leaving behind what we once were and celebrating what we have become, solely because of his Son, Jesus.

Memories foster faith, as we remember how God has met our needs in the past. See if each phrase from Psalm 103 doesn’t trigger a memory in your mind, and a song of praise in your heart:

“Oh, my soul, bless God,

Don’t forget a single blessing!

He forgives your sins—every one.

He heals your diseases—every one.

He redeems you from hell—saves your life!

He crowns you with love and mercy—a paradise crown.

He wraps you in goodness—beauty eternal…

…God makes everything come out right.

He puts victims back on their feet…

…God is sheer mercy and grace;

Not easily angered, he’s rich in love.

He doesn’t treat us as our sins deserve,

Nor pay us back in full for our wrongs.

(Psalm 103:2-10, The Message)

Memories inform the present and provide hope for the future. As we meditate on all those times God has wrapped us in his goodness (v. 5), we are strengthened for what we face today. As we consider the many times he made everything come out right (v. 6), we can trust he will continue to make our paths straight.

Of course, there are some memories we would like to erase—those that generate sadness, hurt, or regret. How do we deal with those? Here are a few suggestions I’ve collected over the years:

  1. We must resist self-pity—even in our thought life. Nowhere in scripture do we read that rehashing the negative is therapeutic. God’s way is to focus on the positive (Philippians 4:8).

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  1. We can follow Paul’s example. He forgot what was in his past and pressed on to what lay ahead (Philippians 3:13). Not that amnesia had set in. Paul simply did not allow past failures to cripple his relationship with God and his service for God. God had forgiven and forgotten; Paul did too. No doubt he applied Philippians 4:8, not only to self-pity, but also to guilt. 
  1. We can leave the past in God’s hands. Oswald Chambers said it so well:

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(“Leave the irreparable Past in His hands, and step out into the Irresistible Future with Him”

–My Utmost for His Highest, Dec. 31.)

 

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Father, I do thank you for the gift of memories—the ability to remember with joy and appreciation the people, places, and experiences of the past. I even thank you for the not-so-good memories, knowing that you use every difficult situation for the development of my maturity (James 1:2-3). And may I take advantage of the wisdom gained in the past to guide me in the present, and lead me into the Irresistible Future with you.

 

Art & Photo credits:  www.trulia.com; http://www.westhighalumni.com; Steve’s photo collection; http://www.allrecipes.com; http://www.god.com; http://www.pinterest.com.

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Supposedly, these housewife tips were circulated in the late 1800s:

“Have dinner ready, prepare yourself, be fresh-looking, clear away the clutter, prepare the children, minimize all noise, be happy to see him, listen to him (remember his topics of conversation are more important than yours), make him comfortable, take off his shoes, be a little gay.”

If that was the prevailing attitude, we might smugly comment, “That advice had to be written by a man.  As if the woman of the house hasn’t put in a long day already, cleaning, cooking, laundering, ironing, taking care of the children, and more.  Now she gets to wait on her husband?  Ridiculous!”

If exposed to enough old nonsense, such as the above, we’re likely to miss true gems.  We see an old picture, a copyright date from decades ago, and we think the article or book will be as worthwhile as those housewife tips.  But that’s not necessarily the case.

For example, do you recognize this gentleman?

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Allow me to introduce you to Desiderius Erasmus, born around 1467 in Holland.

Erasmus was a teacher, theologian, and author, critical of the Catholic church and its abuses of the time.  One belief held by the church hierarchy:  Scripture is much too complicated for the common man to understand.  Only priests should have access to the Bible, and they are the only ones qualified to interpret for the masses.

Erasmus wrote:  “I disagree very much with those who are unwilling that the Holy Scripture…be read by the uneducated, as if Christ taught such intricate doctrines that they could scarcely be understood by very few theologians.”

Such writings helped prepare the way for Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation.

The common sense of Erasmus becomes obvious in more quotes such as these.

  • “If you keep thinking about what you want to do or what you hope will happen, you won’t do it and it won’t happen.”
  • “Prevention is better than cure.”
  • “A nail is driven out by another nail; habit is overcome by habit.”

Good advice, even if it is five hundred years old.

Throughout the centuries, women, too, have acquired wisdom to share. Unfortunately, most was never published.  In the male-dominated world of past generations, women were not offered that privilege.

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One exception is Julian of Norwich, born 1342.  She actually prayed for a serious illness to help her understand the sufferings of Jesus.  At age thirty, the illness came, accompanied by sixteen visions.  She spent the rest of her life meditating on her visions and writing about them.  Her book was the first written in English by a woman.  Here are several of her truth gems:

  • “The greatest honor we can give Almighty God is to live gladly because of the knowledge of his love.”

Sounds like an addendum to Paul’s instruction to rejoice always (Philippians 4:4).  I appreciate the sweet motivation she offers for finding joy in each day.

  • “Truth sees God, and wisdom contemplates God, and from these two comes a third, a holy and wonderful delight in God, who is love.”

Oh, yes.  The more we know of God, the more we direct our thoughts to Him, the more we enjoy Him!

  • “Of all the things our minds can think about God, it is thinking upon his goodness that pleases him most and brings the most profit to our souls.”

Again, such astute observations.  Even if formulated six hundred years ago.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *      *

Thank you, Father, for preserving a wealth of evidence, confirming your presence and inspiration throughout the ages.  Thank you for the testimony of thousands of the saints from ages past. Their perseverance and faith continue to inspire us centuries later.  May we not be among those who ignore the wisdom you have already revealed. 

 

(Art and photo credits: http://www.bjws.blogspot.com; http://www.individual.utoronto.ca; www.trinitystores.com.)

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Last fall I read there were more than 150 million blogs on the internet, with approximately 175,000 new ones being launched daily.  At that rate, cyberspace now includes over 213 million blogs!

After much shopping, I have found twelve devotional blogs which I follow regularly.  I’ll introduce six today and six on Thursday–in no particular order.  After reading these sample bits, you might want to visit these blogs yourself, and discover fresh insight from…

IMG_1727…Jennifer Dukes Lee (www.jenniferdukeslee.com), wife of an Iowa farmer, mother of two daughters, professor of journalism, and author of a new book being released in early 2014.  Recently she wrote about “How to Talk Back to Fear:”

“I believe that bravery looks a lot like…believing.  And I believe that there’s really no such thing as failure, because there’s nothing unredeem-able in the hands of Christ.”

Smart woman, that Jennifer.

…Holley Gerth (www.holleygerth.com), life coach and author, tackled the topic, “When You’re Worried What People Think.”

First, Holley quoted 1 Corinthians 4:3 (MSG):  “It matters very little to me what you think of me, even less where I rank in popular opinion…Comparisons in these matters are pointless.”

Holley says.  “When I care very little what other people think of me then I’ve suddenly got room to care a lot about other people.”

Quite insightful, don’t you agree?

Unshakable Hope…Unshakable Hope (www.unshakablehope.wordpress.com), written by Bill, married more than twenty-five years, father of two daughters, diagnosed in 1996 with ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease.  Bill has very little mobility, yet his spirit is more vibrant than ever.

On February 21, 2013, Bill wrote about Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego (Daniel 3).  They were about to be thrown into King Nebucadnezzar’s furnace and boldly proclaimed, “The God we serve is able to save us…, and he will rescue us from your hand, O king.  But even if he does not…we will not serve your gods or worship the image of gold you have set up (vs. 17-18).

Bill says, “For me, this is more than a great example of strong faith.  I believe this is a pattern of faith that all Christians should emulate regardless of challenges we might be facing.  We can proclaim that, ‘Our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from [insert your trial here].  BUT EVEN IF HE DOES NOT…we are not going to serve…doubt, fear, worry, hopelessness or anything else that destroys faith, hope, joy and peace.’

Strong words from a man of deep strength.

…Morning Story & Dilbert (http://www.morningstoryanddilbert.wordpress.com).  Kenny gleans thought-provoking posts from many sources and serves them up with a Dilbert cartoon — something for the mind and heart; something for the funny bone!

Recently Kenny included an anecdote about Abraham Lincoln, highlighting the president’s humility.  Although Lincoln was wise, responsible, and persevering, surely humility was one of the supreme qualities that contributed to his strong leadership.

Here’s the story Kenny shared:

“After the Battle of Gettysburg, General Robert E. Lee and his Confederate forces were withdrawing to Virginia, and Lincoln felt that they were vulnerable. Eager to get the agony of the war over with, President Lincoln sent word to General Meade to attack.

“With his message, Lincoln also sent a personal note. ‘The order I enclose is not on record,’ said the note. ‘If you succeed, you need not publish it. Then, if you succeed, you will have all the credit of the movement. If not, I’ll take the responsibility.’”

Taking responsibility for failure, but giving others the credit for success.  Now that’s humility.

…Jean Wise of “Healthy Spirituality” (www.healthyspirituality.org), is a former nurse, but now focuses her time on writing My Photoand speaking.

On September 24, 2013, she shared the story of second-string quarterback, Kenny Guiton, of the Ohio State Buckeyes.  Opportunities to get in the game have been few for this senior, but Kenny is always prepared.  Then, on a recent Saturday, he not only had a chance to play, Kenny scored a record six touchdowns!

In contemplating Kenny’s story, Jean said, “My job is to be faithful. To enter each day relying on God’s love and guidance.  To show up every morning with an open mind and heart.  To say to our heavenly coach, ‘Here I am, Lord.  What position do you need me to play today?’  To be ready when He calls me off the bench.  To wait and let God form me as He wills till His time is right.’”

Jean’s prayer resonates with my heart, too.

Diana Trautwein…Diana Trautwein‘s musings at “Just Wondering” (www.dianatrautwein,com).  She’s the mother of three, grandmother of 8, and a graduate of seminary in mid-life.  Currently Diana serves as a spiritual director.  Her post on October 11, 2013 was titled, “Giving Permission to Say No.”  Her words of wisdom include:

“Saying ‘yes’ is central to a full, rich challenging life.  We need to say yes to lots of different things over the course of our [life] journey.”

But!  “Try as we might, we cannot do everything.  (Because God already has.)  We cannot save the world.  (There is only one Savior.)  And we must not work ourselves to death.  (We are meant to enjoy God, and glorify God, not assume responsibilities we were never designed to bear.)”

See what I mean?  Wise woman.

Please return on Thursday to meet six more outstanding bloggers!

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Kind words do not cost much. Yet they accomplish much. ~  Blaise Pascal

“Kind words do not cost much.  Yet they accomplish much.”

*     *     *     *     *     *

“Do you wish people to think well of you?  Don’t speak well of yourself.”

*     *     *     *     *     *

The power of a man’s virtue should not be measured by his special efforts,

but by his ordinary doing.”

*     *     *     *     *     *

Do the above quotes remind you of Proverbs in the Bible?  They do have a similar tone, and certainly impart wisdom.  But they were not penned by King Solomon.  Credit goes to Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).

Portrait of Pascal

His name probably sounds familiar.  Chances are, you studied him in school, either in math class or science, maybe both.

Pascal’s first noteworthy accomplishment?  He formulated  a basic theorem of projective geometry, called Pascal’s theorem– at age sixteen!

He invented a calculating device, to help his father, who was a tax collector–when he was only nineteen.

A Pascaline, an early calculator.

(A Pascaline, Pascal’s early calculator)

Another set of experiments produced his famous law of hydraulics.  He contributed important study on the vacuum, on the weight and density of air, and the arithmetic triangle.

Pascal also developed the theory of probability, which is still used today.

And he invented the syringe, the hydraulic lift, as well as the first mechanical computer.  A computer language is named after him.

Such broad giftedness wrapped up in one young man!  But Pascal was actually embarrassed by all his talents.

Even as he was studying mathematics and conducting scientific experiments, Pascal was also exploring spiritual matters.  He and his sister joined a group of Catholics in France, called Jansenists, who believed that salvation was a gift of God’s grace, and could not be earned through good works.

Pascal said,

(“There is a God-shaped vacuum in the heart of every man which cannot be filled by any created thing, but only by God, the Creator, made known through Jesus Christ.”)

In 1654, Pascal was thrown from a carriage when the horses bolted.  The horses died, but Pascal was unhurt.  He felt convinced God had saved him, and he began thinking seriously about what God might want him to do.

That night Pascal had a vision of the crucifixion and experienced a profound renewal in his spirit.  From that point forward, scientific work was of secondary importance in his life.

At that time, Pascal wrote:  “Certainty!  Joy!  Peace!  I forget the world and everything but God!…I submit myself absolutely to Jesus Christ my Redeemer.”

Pascal recorded  this and other statements about his mystical experience on a piece of parchment, then sewed the document into his coat.  There it remained hidden until it was discovered after he died.  Pascal was only thirty-nine years old.

(Pascal’s “Night of Fire” parchment)

Also discovered after his death:  twenty-seven bundles of notes for a major work defending the Christian faith.  These notes were published posthumously and titled Pensees, or Thoughts.  It became a classic of Christian thinking.

 Pascal’s truth-gems include:

“The supreme function of reason is to show man that some things are beyond reason.”

“Happiness is neither without us nor within us.  It is in God, both without us and within us.”

“If our condition were truly happy, we would not seek diversion from it in order to make ourselves happy.”

“People almost invariably arrive at their beliefs not on the basis of proof but on the basis of what they find attractive.”

Perhaps his most famous statement in the Pensees is a short essay titled “The Wager.”  Here are a few excerpts:

“Either God exists, or He does not.  Which will you gamble on?  If God exists, you win everything.  If He does not exist, you lose nothing.  Do not hesitate, then:  gamble on His existence!”

In other words:

Thank You, Father, for wise men and women such as Blaise Pascal, who express themselves in such rare and beautiful ways.  Their words stretch our intellects and stir our hearts. 

Yet Your greatest joy would be for their words to touch our lives so that tomorrow we are nearer Your best for us–words such as that quote about virtue not being measured by special efforts but by ordinary doing.  Help me to remember that it is in the ordinary that I can reflect You most brilliantly.

 (References:  Eerdman’s Christian Classics;  www.christianitytoday.com ; www.ccel.org; www.answersingenesis.org. ; http://www.brainyquote.com ; http://www.goodreads.com ) 

Photo and graphics credits: http://www.smallactsofkindness.wordpress.com ; http://www.wikipedia.com ; http://www.famousquotesabout.com ; http://www.manifestpropensity.wordpress.com ; http://www.conflicted collegechristians.wordpress.com.

   

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“These are the days when the Christian is expected

to praise every creed except his own.” 

—  G. K. Chesterton

 

Indeed.  Christians are often labeled narrow-minded, because we uphold what the Bible teaches:  that faith in Jesus is the only way to heaven.  We are fair game for pundits to disparage and comedians to ridicule.

This fellow, Chesterton, is right on.  Christians are expected to be kind to others; others are not always kind toward us.

A person might think Chesterton is a current commentator on American culture, but he was born in London in 1874, and died in 1936.

Do you know him?

G. K. did not start out to become a writer, much less a defender of the Christian faith.  He set out to become an artist.  But his first job upon leaving art school was to read manuscripts for a publisher.

In his spare time, he tried his own hand (and mind) at writing.  Several essays were published in magazines, and it wasn’t long before two newspapers began publishing his column.

Over a period of thirty years in journalism, G. K. wrote 4000 essays.  Dale Ahlquist, President of the American Chesterton Society, points out the immensity of that number: you would have to write an essay every day for eleven years to reach that total.

 

 

Mr. Ahlquist adds to the marvel of this feat by reminding us: every one of Chesterton’s essays was an example of fine journalism—often witty and thought-provoking at the same time.  For example:

“When we were children we were grateful to those who filled our stockings at Christmastime.  Why are we not grateful to God for filling our stockings with legs?” 

But unlike many journalists, G. K.’s writing talent swept across numerous genres.  During his lifetime, he wrote hundreds of books, both fiction and nonfiction, two anthologies of poetry, five plays, and over 200 short stories.

It’s no wonder he’s credited with being one of the most prolific authors of his time.

 

 

While his career as a writer was burgeoning, Chesterton married Frances Blogg.  She was an important influence, helping to turn him from his agnostic beliefs to embrace Christianity.  His writings often reflected his faith.  For example:

“Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried” (from What’s Wrong with the World).

“There are those who hate Christianity and call their hatred an all-embracing love for all religions.” – (from Illustrated London News, 1/13/06)

“…the curtness of the Ten Commandments is an evidence, not of the gloom and narrowness of a religion, but, on the  contrary, of its liberality and humanity. It is shorter to state the things  forbidden than the things permitted: precisely because most things are permitted, and only a few things are forbidden.” – (from Illustrated London News, 1-3-20)

Even after his death, Chesterton’s influence lived on.  One of his books, The Everlasting Man (1925) was instrumental in leading C. S. Lewis from agnosticism to Christianity.

An evangelical Protestant scholar has said, “There has not been a more articulate champion of classic Christianity, virtue, and decency.”

Here are a few more examples of G.K.’s thoughtful writing:

“One sees great things from the valley; only small things from the peak.”

“I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.”

 “If I can put one touch of rosy sunset into the life of any man or woman, I shall feel that I have worked with God.”

 Words of wisdom?  I think so.  And if…

 

 

 …“he who walks with the wise grows wise” (Proverbs 13:20a), then we have certainly benefited from spending a few moments with G. K. Chesterton.

 

(Photo credits:  www.saltandlighttv.org , www.catholicnewsagency.com , www.lifesitenews.com , www.biblegodquotes.com)

 

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Living Our Days

Gaining a heart of wisdom

Heartful Faith

Chasing After God's Own Heart

Laurie Klein, Scribe

immerse in God, emerge refreshed

Strength Renewed

But those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary; they will walk and not be faint. Isaiah 40:31

Colleen Scheid

Writing, Acting, Living the Grace of God

Walking Well With God

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Shelly Miller

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Mitch Teemley

The Power of Story

Wings of the Dawn

even there Your hand will lead me ~ poems and devotions by Heidi Viars

Just Wondering

Impressions Becoming Expressions

(in)courage

Impressions Becoming Expressions