Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘God’ Category

 

A homeless woman slumped against the familiar brick wall of the warehouse, then grouped her plastic shopping bags snugly around her. Next she looped several bag-handles on her legs, and stretched her arms over the rest. The worry of losing to theft any of her treasured possessions kept her vigilant. Once settled, she succumbed to a fitful doze.

A man approached. “Excuse me, ma’am,” he called gently. “Are you Genevieve Bartlett?”

The woman startled awake, instinctively clutching her belongings more tightly. “What if I am?” she grumbled.

“Well, if you can answer a few questions for me, I may have some excellent news for you,” he replied calmly, recognizing that defensiveness in her position was only to be expected.

Genevieve returned his gaze with a scowl, but sat up straighter, readying herself to listen. The questions were easy: what were the names of her deceased parents and grandparents, when and where had she been born, and where had she attended school.

The man handed her his card and began to explain. “My name is Henry Lewis. I’m a lawyer, here to inform you you’re the last surviving Bartlett of your family, and you’ve just inherited fifty million dollars. If you’ll come with me, we can take care of the details at my office, and start the process of…finding a more comfortable situation for you. Would that be to your liking?”

 

 

Genevieve didn’t move for several moments. “Fifty million dollars,” she repeated slowly, and studied the lawyer’s face. Could he possibly be telling the truth? But why else would he seek her out at the warehouse?

Genevieve suddenly slipped the bag-handles off her legs, stood up, and announced, “I’m ready, let’s go!” Without even looking back, Genevieve left her shopping bags and their worthless contents on the pavement.

Out of several interpretations for this story, consider the shopping bags as representative of our fears. Don’t we sometimes hold on to them—worthless as they are—as tightly as Genevieve held on to her belongings?

But as God’s children, we possess tremendous wealth, worth much more than fifty million dollars, because “the kingdom of heaven is like treasure” (Matthew 13:44). And unlike Genevieve during her homeless days, we have access to a good part of that treasure now, if we let go of our worries and lay hold of our wealth.

 

 

So what might that treasure include?  Consider the following:

1. God’s Glorious Provision. Unlike Genevieve, we know a glorious inheritance is waiting for us.  Ours is in heaven—an inheritance so magnificent, when we arrive there, we’ll look back on our earthly lives “as an insubstantial dream from which we have happily awoken” (Austin Farrer).

2. God’s Involvement. He is always at work. Take note of his wisdom in creation, his engineering of life-circumstances, and his generosity in the blessings he bestows. God even makes joy available in the midst of trouble. 

3. God’s Sovereignty.  No doubt Mr. Lewis designed a plan for Genevieve to provide for her well-being. God too has designed a perfect and purposeful plan to accomplish much good, in the world at large and for each of us individually.  Whatever we entrust to him, he will take care of much better than we can.

 

 

4. God’s Unfailing Love.  We can leave our worries behind, as Genevieve did her shopping bags, when we dwell on the lovingkindness of God. In fact, peace of heart is guaranteed–if we keep our focus upon him. 

5. God’s Constant Presence. He is always with us—even as we wait for him to act. The attentive person recognizes his presence in the aria of a songbird, the sunbeams of a morning, the spontaneous hug of a friend.

 

 

6. God’s Kindness and Care.  Surely Genevieve marveled for the rest of her days how Mr. Lewis had changed her life.  We can draw strength and great delight from remembering God’s gracious provisions of our past.

7. God’s Powerful Word. Scripture offers indispensable comfort and encouragement, reminding us that God is our protective Shield and dependable Rock, our caring Shepherd and devoted Helper, our loving Provider and strong Confidence.

 

 

In these seven ways and more, God generously shares his inheritance with us now, giving us the opportunity to overcome anxiety with joy.   After all, every fear about our future, safety, health, suffering, death, financial woes, inadequacy, and events beyond our control are good-for-nothing baggage.

The question becomes: Will I let go of my worthless bags of worries and lay hold of my glorious inheritance?

 

 

Scripture Notes for:

  1. 1 Peter 1:3-4
  2. Deuteronomy 32:4; 1 Chronicles 29:11; Psalm 94:19
  3. 2 Chronicles 20:6; Romans 8:28
  4. Psalm 94:17-18; Isaiah 26:3
  5. Psalm 23:4
  6. Psalm 92:4
  7. Psalm 3:3; 18:2; 23:1; 46:1; 78:23-29; Proverbs 14:26

 

(Genevieve’s story is based on an illustration from Charles Spurgeon’s sermon, “To Give You the Kingdom.”)

 

Photo credits:  http://www.flickr.com; http://www.maxpixel.net; http://www.publicdomainpictures.net; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.pexels.com; wwww.canva.com; http://www.dailyverses.net.

 

Read Full Post »

 

“Here comes another one!” little Jim cried to his dad, as they stood atop the small airport terminal not far from their house. Father and son spent occasional afternoons watching the planes take off and land, much to Jim’s delight.

His sharp ears would pick up a plane’s droning buzz before his eyes could make out the small dot in the sky. He hardly breathed as the plane slowly descended, then lightly touched down on the landing field.

The wonder never grew old. And Jim wished more than anything to be in the cockpit, participating in the miracle of flight, not just observing.

That dream stayed with Jim all through school. Upon graduation he attended the U.S. Naval Academy, and then entered the Air Force. His plan was to become a commercial pilot after his term of service.

 

(The P-51 Mustang)

 

And then Jim chanced to fly a P-51, the fastest jet of the time and capable of flying almost vertically. After that experience, commercial piloting seemed much too tame.

Jim went back to school to earn his master’s degree in aeronautical and instrumentation engineering and graduated in 1957.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was established the following year and Jim Irwin set his sites on becoming an astronaut. To achieve that goal he needed to become a test pilot.

 

 

Jim entered that program in 1960. Once qualified he was assigned to a top-secret mission: testing a plane that flew higher and faster than any previous aircraft.

Three times he applied for the astronaut program; twice he was rejected. Finally in 1966 his acceptance letter arrived. Jim’s first assignment was to direct the testing of a lunar landing module that engineers were designing.

 

 

Then came the moment he’d been waiting for. He and fellow astronauts David Scott and Alfred Worden were chosen for the Apollo 15 mission, scheduled to take place the summer of 1971.

Eighteen months of intense training were required to prepare the men for the twelve-day expedition, three of which would be spent on the moon.

The boy who wanted to fly would soar where only a dozen men had traveled before him.

 

 

Their mission included collecting rock samples and conducting experiments in an unexplored region of the moon. They would also be the first astronauts to drive a Lunar Rover that allowed investigation of a larger area than that of previous missions.

Jim was the eighth person to walk on the moon—certainly a thrill-of-a-lifetime. But later he would insist, those moments on the moon weren’t exciting because he was there, but because God was there. Jim profoundly sensed his presence.

 

 

He’d been a Christian for over twenty years by 1971, but “I was…[a] silent Christian,” he would explain.

On the moon, as Jim looked up at Planet Earth against the black backdrop of the universe, he marveled at its fragile appearance—so delicate that if someone reached out to touch it, the world would surely crumble and fall apart, he said. Jim experienced overwhelming awe for the creation of God and his love for the entire human race—love that sent his Son Jesus earthward to die in their place.

 

 

One of Jim’s responsibilities on the mission was to set up the mechanism for lunar experiments. Not all steps proceeded successfully. But instead of inquiring the NASA engineers, Jim prayed, because waiting for a reply from Houston would take too long.

Each time he sensed God telling him what to do, and he felt the supernatural presence of God with him as he worked. That sensation was so strong, Jim felt sure if he turned around, Jesus would be standing right there at his shoulder.

As complicated as the moon landings were, Apollo 15 proceeded without major problems. The three astronauts landed safely in the Pacific Ocean on August 7, even though one parachute (out of three) didn’t deploy.

 

 

A little more than two weeks later Irwin, Scott, and Worden were honored by a ticker tape parade in New York City. As Jim waved to the thousands gathered along the street, his heart ached for those who did not know Jesus as a personal Friend, and he felt God wanted him to tell others about his Son.

A year later Jim resigned from NASA and formed the High Flight Foundation to share about Jesus from his experiences as an astronaut, and to encourage archaeological research, confirming the accuracy of the Bible.

Jim even participated in exploration of Mt. Ararat in Turkey, where other adventurers claimed to have seen what looked like ship remains, high up on the slopes. Conjecturers proposed that perhaps Noah’s ark had been found.

 

(Mount Ararat, nearly 17,000 ft. in elevation)

 

Jim’s astronaut-status provided opportunities that other exploratory teams had not been able to achieve. Government officials allowed the High Flight Foundation access to sites that had been refused to others. Yet in spite of these privileges, Jim and his crew never found the ancient ark.

For twenty years after his moon-landing adventure, Jim Irwin told others that “Jesus walking on earth was much more important than man walking on the moon, that Jesus was the way to know God and receive eternal life.”*

 

 

The day before the twentieth anniversary of his homecoming from the moon, the boy who wanted to fly flew further still. Jim experienced his homecoming in heaven, due to a massive heart attack. He was survived by his wife Mary and their five children.

No doubt, James Benson Irwin heard those beautiful words, “Well done, good and faithful servant (Matthew 25:21)!” Only this time, Jim didn’t just feel Jesus’ presence. This time, Jim was able to see his Savior and Friend face to face.

 

 

* https://godreports.com/2100/03/encounter-with-jesus-on-the-moon-left-astronaut-changed/

 

Sources:

  1. https://biography.yourdictionary.com/james-benson-irwin
  2. https://crev.info/scientists/james-irwin/
  3. https://defendingthechristianfaith.org/others-who-testify-of-faith-in-christ.html
  4. https://godreports.com/2011/03/encounter-with-jesus-on-the-moon-left-astronaut-changed/
  5. https://ramsheadpress.com/messiah/ch17.html
  6. https://www.rocketstem.org/2015/07/07/rovering-across-the-moon-during-apollo-15/

 

Photo credits:  http://www.ebay.com; http://www.commons.wikimedia.org; http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil; http://www.nasa.gov; http://www.jsc.nasa.gov; http://www.wikipedia.org; http://www.picryl.com; http://www.wikimedia.com (3); http://www.canva.com.

 

Read Full Post »

 

Along with spring-cleaning of the house, I thought perhaps a purging of the blog-post-ideas file would be worthwhile. Six years of collecting starters has produced thirty-five pages of possibilities.

Some ideas have languished in a notebook nearly the whole six years. It’s probably time to admit they’re never going to amount to anything, I decided.

Then you came to mind! Maybe you’ll see potential where I’ve given up hope. And with a deft question or suggestion you’ll send me off researching and keyboarding with your fresh insight.

Or, you’ll say, “I’d like to know more about that. Keep that one in the hopper!” And the life of that idea will thus be saved.

So what occurs to you about these topics, dear readers? Do you see any possibilities here for a worthwhile post or two?

  1. From Anxiety to Joy. Psalm 94:19 says, “When anxiety was great within me, your consolation brought me joy.” What might those consolations be that can bring joy in the midst of anxiety? (That’s quite a feat!)

 

 

2.  God’s ways are an outgrowth of his character—even when tragedy strikes. How can hurt and pain be the outgrowth of God’s beautiful and perfect attributes?

3.  Delight and Desire. Psalm 37:4 says, “Take delight in the Lord, and he will give you the desires of your heart.” How do we learn to delight in the Lord and desire what he desires?

4.  The Adventure of Grace. What insight might we gain from the definition of adventure? How is the life of grace is like an adventure, and why is that attitude helpful? How can we embrace the adventure more enthusiastically?

 

 

5.  The power of right attitudes over body, mind, and spirit. What have medical science and psychology discovered about the impact of attitudes? What does scripture have to say? How can we change our attitudes?

6.  “He who keeps one end in view makes all things serve”—Robert Browning.   That statement is true in the Christian life: if our main ambition is to fulfill God’s purpose, then all events will serve equally well.

7.  Goodness is not only good for those around us, it’s good for us.

8.  How do we accept with grace the circumstances that are unpleasant and outside our control?

9.  Turning Boredom into Contentment. Life can be full of mundane tasks that sap the joy right out of our spirits. What’s a person to do?!

 

 

10.  Game-Changers. Our viewpoints of life’s circumstances are perhaps more important than the circumstances themselves. Sometimes all it takes is a pithy statement to change our attitude. Possibilities include: “We obey God, not because we have to but because we get to” (A quote from one of the lay pastors at our church.) Or, how about this statement: “If the Lord does not change the place for the better, he will make us better in the place” (Charles Spurgeon). What other perspective-changers can we apply on a circumstantial rainy day?

11. Taking offense at less and less provocation seems to have pervaded our culture. What happened to resilience? Is it important? Does the Bible give us instruction for this attribute? How do we develop it?

12.  Rock Climbing—a metaphor for life. We need the handholds of God’s character when life becomes a difficult climb. We must cling to his attributes.

 

 

That’s enough for today. I’ll look forward to reading your creative suggestions in the comment section below!

 

(Photo credits:  http://www.thebluediamondgallery.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.nps.gov; http://www.flickr.com.)

 

Read Full Post »

 

Every now and then, even positive people are bothered by a niggling, accusatory voice in their heads, offering such (Please note the sarcasm.) helpful comments as:

  • “Look at that guy—one successful venture after another. What have you accomplished lately, Ms./Mr. Nobody?”
  • “Everybody in that group was so articulate compared to you. Why are you such an idiot?”
  • “This assignment is way beyond your abilities. You’re gonna make a fool of yourself.”

Such self-talk is destructive; you know it. But how do you turn it off?  With affirmative battle cries. Positive rebuttal will send those self-critical thoughts into retreat—back to the darkness where they came from.

A proper battle cry can stir up encouragement, inspire perseverance, and be a reminder of who you really are, as well as what you can actually do.

And the very best battle cries are based on scripture.  These examples may provide a good place to start:

  1. You are a cherished daughter/son of God!

You may be focused on your inadequacies and failures, but God is not. His attention is riveted on what you will be—completely perfect and whole.

And as he works within you toward that goal, he rejoices in your progress. Follow his example, and celebrate your steps on the right path.

 

 

  1. You are a masterpiece–not a mess!

Consider what constitutes a masterpiece: artistic genius, extraordinary design, superlative craftsmanship, and originality—among other glorious qualities.  That’s YOU!

Never forget: the greatest Artistic Genius of the universe created you. He fashioned a one-of-a-kind mold for your personality, your particular traits and talents, your specific purpose.  Embrace who he made you to be.

 

 

  1. You have been created in the image of God himself!

And he’s given you the privilege to brightly reflect his magnificent image to those around you.

Consider yourself a stained glass window, with God’s light (all his magnificent attributes) gleaming through the shapes and colors of your individuality, your abilities, in order to bless those around you.

 

 

  1. You are a true Superman/Superwoman!

More than a conqueror,” Paul said.  That makes you a super-conqueror (!), through the one who loves you–Jesus.

And because of him, you are guaranteed victory in the end.  Now each day can be viewed as an adventure with God, not an affliction.

 

 

  1. You are capable to accomplish anything God prepares for you to do!

That’s because nothing is impossible for him. He goes ahead of you to prepare the way, and supplies the abilities necessary to complete your mission.

In addition, “[He] will help you deal with whatever hard things come up–when the time comes” (Matthew 6:34, MSG).

 

 

  1. You are equipped to thrive!

In the soil of God’s unfailing love, and with the nourishment of his encouraging Word, you can grow seeds of contentment, and they will produce the fruit of joy and peace.

 

   

 

So!  Are you feeling inadequate for the day or frustrated by what you face?

Perhaps a few of these battle cries speak to your situation. State them firmly out loud, and for greater impact, speak in front of a mirror.

Affirm to yourself who you are really.

___________________________________

 

Scriptural support for each battle cry:

  1. 1 John 3:1-2; Hebrews 10:14; Philippians 1:6; Psalm 147:11; Psalm 119:35.
  2. Ephesians 2:10 NLT; Psalm 139:16; Proverbs 19:21.
  3. Genesis 1:27; 2 Corinthians 3:18.
  4. Romans 8:37; 1 Corinthians 15:57.
  5. Philippians 4:13; Matthew 19:26; Ephesians 2:10; Psalm 37:23 CSB; 1 Peter 4:11; Matthew 6:34 MSG, emphasis added.
  6. John 10:10; Jeremiah 29:11; 2 Timothy 3:17; Ephesians 3:17-19; Psalm 119:24; Philippians 4:12-13; 1 Peter 1:8-9; Isaiah 26:3.

 

What battle cry against the negative self-talk helps you?  Please add your suggestion in the Comment section below!

 

(Photo credits:  http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.pixabay.com.)

Read Full Post »

Contrasts have a way of attracting notice.  Consider:

 

 

  • A sparkling diamond against black velvet
  • One lone light shining against the night
  • The first bright flower of spring against pale snow

 

 

The stories of Good Friday and Easter are also full of contrasts. Consider:

 

  • The false witnesses who twisted Jesus’ words—against his sinless life “full of grace and truth” (Matthew 26:59; John 1:14).

 

 

  • The frenzied clamor of the crowd—against the self-controlled silence of Jesus (Matthew 27:22-24; 27:14)

 

  • The mournful wails of women on their way to Golgotha— against the overflowing joy of women on their way to tell the disciples, “Jesus has risen from the dead!” (Luke 23:27; Matthew 28:8)

 

 

  • The horrific ugliness of the scourging and crucifixion—against the poignant beauty of Jesus caring for his mother (John 19:23, 26-27)

 

  • The disbelief of the centurion, guards, and one of the thieves crucified with Jesus—against the newfound faith they all experienced, born out of watching Jesus die (Luke 22:63-65 and 23:36, Matthew 27:48 and 27:54, Luke 23:40-43)

 

 

  • The darkness that covered the land during those last hours of Jesus’ crucifixion—against the lightning-brilliance of the angel who announced his resurrection (Matthew 27:45, 28:2-3)

 

  • The curtain-barrier to the Most Holy Place in the temple—against the free and open entrance to God’s presence, made available to all when he tore that curtain in two from top to bottom (Matthew 27:51; Hebrews 10:19-22)

 

  • The most grievous and repugnant deed of history—against the most glorious and life-changing reality: Jesus was raised from the dead to eternal life and now offers the same incredible prospect for us (1 Corinthians 15:3-4, 55, 57)

 

 

These and other contrasts of the Easter story attract undeniable notice to the perfections of our Savior, the unfathomable love that prompted his sacrifice, and the power of his incomparable resurrection—if we have eyes to see.

And eyes that truly see inspire hearts that fervently respond–in faithful love and grateful obedience.

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

Precious Jesus, how we long for words to fully express our praise to you! Against all the forces of evil, you arose victorious. Now, in place of our guilt you provide healing forgiveness and eternal salvation. Now we needn’t fear the day when our eyes close on earth for the last time, because in the next moment, they will open in heaven. Hallelujah!      

(Zechariah 9:9; Revelation 19:16; Philippians 2:9-11;

Charles Spurgeon, Morning by Morning, p. 113)

 

Art & photo credits: http://www.pexels.com; http://www.flickr.com;  www.wallpaper4god.com.; http://www.heartlight.com (2); http://www.dailyverses.net.

 

Read Full Post »

 

In the midst of my harried day

When I seem farthest from myself

A moment comes to me and beckons,

“Let us fly away.”

 

Shutting out the din

Of the never-ending to-do

I close my eyes and begin

To wander in thoughts sublime;

And gather flowers in my mind.

 

–Tara Afriat*

 

Such delightful imagery Tara creates with that last line. But I wonder, what sublime thoughts might be worthy of a bouquet in my mind?  So far, five varieties have occurred to me:

 

1. Humor offers blooms of joy.

 

 

Just recently my husband was hospitalized and underwent a number of tests. When an orderly came to accompany Steve to a procedure he announced, “One CT scan, coming up. Would you like fries with that?”

I’m thinking a new journal specifically for humor might be fun to keep (and savor later).

 

2. Quotes provide blooms of wisdom, encouragement, and beauty.

Isn’t it amazing how a few well-chosen words can suddenly enlighten our understanding or give us eyes to see what was invisible just moments before?

A recent addition in my quote journal offers wisdom, encouragement, and the potential for beauty:

 

 

“Make one person happy every day and in forty years

you’ll have made 14,600 human beings happy

for a little time at least.”

–Unknown

 

Such encouragement gives wise perspective to the impact of small kindnesses, doesn’t it?   And what fun to cause 14,600 beautiful smiles!

 

3. Observations become blooms of refreshment.

 

 

Another journal on my shelf is titled “A Celebration of Small Things.” Each day I record at least one observation worth noting, because:

 

“A grateful heart is one

that finds the countless blessings of God

in the seemingly mundane of

every day life.”

–Anonymous

 

Pages of entries over the last two years remind me of just how blessed I am. For example:

January 10, 2017: “The birds are singing a “Hallelujah Chorus” of their own this morning, in celebration of the sudden balmy temperatures—into the upper 50s!”

 

 

Review of such moments does refresh my attitude.

 

4. Kindness creates blooms of grace.

In 1987 I began a journal to document God’s grace. So far, the record of more than 1300 entries offers sublime flower-gathering in my mind. Again, one example:

1996/97 proved to be a particularly challenging year at the school where I taught. Frustration plagued many of us faculty members. In late September I confessed to my early morning prayer group my difficulty in letting go of annoyance, and Betty prayed for me.

Minutes later as I drove to school, my attention was drawn to bright sunbeams radiating from behind great billowing clouds. It seemed the windows of heaven had been opened, and the glory of God on his throne radiated from just beyond that cloud bank. I could almost hear him saying, “You’re going to be fine—I’m right here to help you!”

 

 

Betty’s kind prayer and that God-given sky-reminder provided perfect affirmation. And now, that entry and many like it remind me: My Heavenly Father has been ever-faithful in the past; I can trust him for the future.

 

5. Scripture provides blooms of truth.

Within the pages of the Bible we find a variety of flowers for the mind, including those mentioned here: wisdom, encouragement, beauty, refreshment, and grace. But the most important is truth. Absolute truth.

We live in a time when relative truth is embraced by many, but:

 

 

(“Truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it,

ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is.”

–Winston Churchill)

 

The wise person seeks after truth—truth that revives the soul, gives joy to the heart, and provides insight for a well-lived life. That’s exactly what the Bible provides (Psalm 19:7-8).**

One psalmist who reveled in scripture wrote: “Oh, how I love your law! I meditate on it all day long” (Psalm 119:97).

And no wonder. The Bible is a continual source of flowers for the mind—of the very best, wisest, and most beautiful kind.

 

Where do you gather flowers of the mind? Share with us in the Comment section below!

__________________________________

 

*Quoted from Soul Retreats for Busy People, compiled by Lila Emspon

 

**If you’re not sure whether scripture is reliable truth or not, I recommend Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis, The Reason for God by Timothy Keller, or The Reason Why Faith Makes Sense by Mark Mittleberg. It is the honest person who invites God to reveal himself.

 

Photo credits:  http://www.pexels.com; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.pixabay.com (2); http://www.nps.gov;  http://www.pocketshare.speedofcreativity.org; http://www.azquotes.com.

 

Read Full Post »

 

 

As I left the hospital Sunday evening, my attention was drawn to two little boys cavorting back and forth in the corridor, jackets winging behind them. In their father’s arms nestled their baby sister, barely visible in her hooded pink coat. Mama and Daddy were deep in conversation.

While passing them by, a strange phenomenon caught my eye: Mama was barefoot.

 

 

One of my alter egos, Sherlock Ruegg, began ruminating why a woman who was otherwise well-dressed for a Midwestern March evening, would be without shoes. Did she just receive emergency care for one or both of her feet? There was no sign of bandages.

A few moments later as I loaded my belongings into our SUV, the family of five came into view again. Poor Mama was still barefoot and hobbling along on her heels, no doubt to lessen the impact of freezing cold pavement on her feet.

Then I spied the evidence I’d missed before, and the explanation became clear.  Mama was clutching stiletto heels in her hands.   Obviously, the pain inflicted by the shoes was worse than that of frigid concrete.

 

(Don’t these look comfy for a long trek?)

 

Oh, what we’re willing to suffer in order to look fashionable, glamorous, and beautiful.

“Beauty” became my word of intentional focus for 2019 when I kept encountering such quotes as:

 

Beauty is a fountain,

emanating from the core of our souls

and bubbling outward,

overflowing.”

—Kristen Armstrong,

Work in Progress

 

What lovely imagery Kristen provides for the beauty that begins in our souls and bubbles up to our faces in cheerful expressions, ready smiles, and twinkling eyes. Such beauty overflows into deeds also.

 

 

But an ever-flowing stream of loveliness is impossible to maintain on our own.  We must allow God to do the work within us.

 

“God in his mercy

is shaping us into

what is useful and beautiful.

—Eugene Peterson,

Run with the Horses

 

And what does our Heavenly Father consider beautiful? (I’m pretty sure high heels don’t make his list.)

Thus far I’ve collected these descriptors and scriptures:

 

 

  • Strength and dignity (Proverbs 31:25)*
  • Wisdom and kindness (Proverbs 31:26)*
  • Encouragement, peace, blessing, and witness (Isaiah 52:7)
  • Godliness and good works (1 Timothy 2:10)
  • A reflection of his glory (1 Corinthians 3:18)
  • A calm and gentle spirit (1 Peter 3:4)*

 

 

Such a fountain of beautiful attributes can’t help but overflow into the lives of others. 

 

“Every time we reveal [God’s] attributes…

share the good news of Christ…

reflect patience in the middle of an upsetting problem…

smile from the heart or offer an encouraging word…

we are displaying the beauty

and glory of our God.”

—Joni Eareckson Tada,

A Quiet Place in a Crazy World

 

That’s the key to effervescent beauty. It’s not about our reflection in the mirror; it’s about reflecting to the world the beauty of our Heavenly Father and his attributes (Psalm 34:5a).

 

 

“Those who look to him radiant,” wrote King David (Psalm 34:5a).

And just what does radiant mean? In part, glowing or emitting brilliance.

Think of a fresh, dew-drenched rose or a multi-faceted diamond glittering on black velvet or the dancing glow of the Northern Lights—all examples of radiance.

What’s our response to such sights? We’re mesmerized, compelled to stare and take in the glory of such luminosity.

 

 

Radiant beauty does that; it seizes our attention.

Just so, there is within all of us the potential to be captivatingly beautiful people—drawing attention to our God of luminous Light who is perfect in beauty (Psalm 50:2).

 

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

Heavenly Father, as I strive to take in all your glorious magnificence, may I be open and mindful, allowing such meditation to achieve full effect upon my heart. Then I’ll become transparent, able to reflect your beautiful, radiant Light.

 

(Psalm 19:14; Colossians 3:1; Philippians 2:14-16)

 

*Yes, Proverbs 31 highlights the virtuous woman, and 1 Peter 3:3-4 also addresses women, but such qualities as strength and dignity, wisdom and kindness, composure and gentleness, are mentioned elsewhere in scripture and are just as attractive in men.  Am I right, ladies?

 

Art & photo credits:  http://www.publicdomainpictures.net; http://www.pexels.com (Daria Shevtsova); http://www.pexels.com; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.flickr.com (Javcon 117); http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.canva.com; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.canva.com.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Living Our Days

Gaining a heart of wisdom

In The Winter of My Life

A Season to Savor, A Season to Share

Laurie Klein, Scribe

immerse in God, emerge refreshed

Strength Renewed

But those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary; they will walk and not be faint. Isaiah 40:31

Colleen Scheid

Writing, Acting, Living the Grace of God

Walking Well With God

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Shelly Miller

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Mitch Teemley

The Power of Story

Wings of the Dawn

even there Your hand will lead me ~ poems and devotions by Heidi Viars

Holley Gerth

Empowering You To Become All You're Created To Be

Unshakable Hope

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you will abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Romans 15:13)

Healthy Spirituality

Nurturing Hearts Closer to God

Just Wondering

Impressions Becoming Expressions

(in)courage

Impressions Becoming Expressions