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Archive for the ‘Intimacy with God’ Category

Tonight, the Thursday before Easter, we remember the Last Supper and the heart-wrenching scene in the Garden of Gethsemane.  It was there Jesus prayed, “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done”(1).

In a matter of hours from that moment, Jesus would face unimaginable pain and suffering. Yet his prayers were not only for himself that night. He prayed for his disciples, and he even prayed for us—those who would believe in him in the future. His desire was that God’s love and his presence would be in us (2). I marvel at such selflessness in the midst of supreme crisis, don’t you?

As a result of his death on the cross and resurrection from the grave, Jesus made possible the fulfillment of that prayer. Our crucified, resurrected, and ascended Christ indwells every believer (3).

Think of it. The all-powerful, all-wise Lord of the universe lives within us! But just what does that mean?

I like Sarah Young’s explanation: We are intertwined with him in an intimacy involving every fiber of our beings (4).

It means that God makes available to us everything we need:

  • Power to handle life’s challenges (2 Corinthians 12:9)
  • Wisdom to determine right actions from wrong (James 1:5)
  • Access to talk to him at any time (Hebrews 4:16)
  • Personalized purpose, to fulfill a God-ordained plan (Jeremiah 29:11)
  • Hope that can never be disappointed (Isaiah 40:31)
  • Resources that can never be exhausted (Philippians 4:19)

It means that in Christ we have:

  • Complete forgiveness (Hebrews 8:12)
  • Everlasting life (John 3:16)
  • Overflowing joy (Psalm 16:11)
  • Deep peace (John 14:27)
  • Attentive care (1 Peter 5:7)

Sometimes I act like the Israelites on their trek to the Promised Land. Remember the manna God provided so they wouldn’t go hungry? It tasted like wafers made with honey (5).

Yet they became so accustomed to the provision, they began to complain. Manna wasn’t good enough after a while.  “Yes, Lord,” they may have said.  “You’ve been very gracious to provide manna, but we need meat!”

These blessings of Christ in us listed above are more precious even than miraculous manna. How could I take such astounding blessings for granted? Add to that the incredible price Jesus paid so I could enjoy those blessings. How dare I think, Yes, Lord, you’ve been very gracious, but I need more!

*     *     *     *     *     *     *   *     *     *

Dearest Jesus, as I contemplate your deep distress in the Garden of Gethsemane, your suffering at the hands of Roman soldiers, and the unfathomable pain you endured on the cross, my petty wants become inconsequential.

Forgive me for allowing familiarity to dull my senses of awe and gratitude for the sacrifice you made. Willingly.  Lovingly.  

“Love so amazing, so divine, demands my soul, my life, my all” (6).

So be it.

Notes:

  1. Luke 22:42
  2. John 17:26
  3. Colossians 1:27
  4. Jesus Calling, 332.
  5. Exodus 16:31
  6. From the hymn, When I Survey the Wondrous Cross

Art credit:  www.free bible images.org.

(Revised and reblogged from April 17, 2014, while we enjoy a week-long visit from our daughter and family.)

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(What follows is an imaginary conversation between God and me as I contemplated the verses above.)

ME:

O God, at face value this proclamation excludes me from your presence. How unthinkable! I can’t imagine life without you actively involved, providing strength, wisdom, encouragement, and more.

But I haven’t led a blameless life, I haven’t always done what is right, nor kept my mouth from lies or insincerity. Any effort on my part to warrant access to your presence would fall horribly short of your standard.

However.  You understand what I’m made of; you know I’m just dust! You’ve provided the Way for me to enter your presence—even enjoy relationship with you—through your perfect and blameless Son.[1]

Jesus’ sacrifice in my place provided a figurative, pure white robe for me to wear, constructed from his uprightness, which is more than sufficient to cover all the stains of my sins.

It’s not my failures and wrongdoing that you see, but that radiant, spotless robe. “Thank you” seem such paltry words for such a precious gift![2]

And yet, even though I’ve been forgiven of all wrongs and no longer stand condemned, I dearly desire to be pure before you, including my thoughts, motives, and desires. 

I want to please you in appreciation for all you’ve done for me. In addition, a pure life of wisdom and goodness will allow me to experience the fullness of your blessings like peace and joy, untainted by any sin, guilt, or shame.[3]

How do I become pure, Father?

GOD:

(Put your name in the blanks.)

It pleases me greatly, __________, that this is your heart’s desire. Remember, just as my Spirit led you to Jesus, he is at work within you creating good.[4]

This is a joint effort, however. You strive toward purity while I strengthen you for the task and augment the outcome. With each step you take, the next one becomes easier as you grow in self-discipline.[5]

Let’s begin with your thought life. I inspired Paul to include eight adjectives that describe the kinds of thoughts that will cleanse the mind of negativity, discouragement, and temptation:

And the purest, most noble truth you can dwell on is my Word.

Within the covers of your Bible you find the guidance you need and the wherewithal to heed it, the encouragement to press on and the strength to do it, the comfort for every wound and the faith to embrace it.

And then pray, dear __________.  Seek the quality of purity as King David did when he asked, “Create in me a clean heart within me, O God” (Psalm 51:10).

Thus empowered by noble thoughts, scripture-truth, and heartfelt prayers, you’ll learn to love the sound of your feet walking away from things not meant for you[6] and reveling in the pure things that are.

Then–such wonderful blessings I’ve reserved for you! Remember what Jesus said in his Sermon on the Mount?

To see me is to enjoy intimate fellowship with me. You’ll sense my presence with you. Together we’ll enjoy my glory reflected in creation, in the events of your life, and in the lives of others.

I’ll open your eyes to see rare splendors of my glory.  From morning till night, __________, you’ll be praising my name and I will smile with delight.[7]

ME:

O Father, grow me in purity so I may present it as a love-gift back to you, and as a means of experiencing the blissful life with you that you so graciously offer.

In the powerful name of your Son Jesus I pray, AMEN.


[1] Psalm 103:14; 1 John 4:15, 2 Corinthians 5:21

[2] Isaiah 61:10;

[3] Romans 8:1; Romans 12:1-2; John 14:21; Proverbs 2:1-11; James 3:17

[4] Philippians 1:6, 2:13;

[5] 2 Timothy 2:22; 2 Corinthians 9:10; Galatians 5:22-23

[6] Based on quote, author unknown

[7] Isaiah 6:3; 2 Corinthians 3:18; Psalm 113:3; Psalm 147:11

Photo credits: http://www.canva.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.maxpixel.net; http://www.dailyverses.net.

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While exercising last Friday I listened to a podcast of Pete Briscoe’s sermon, “Every Day Jesus.” He made the point that we can actually see “tangible evidence of his intangible love” if we’re paying attention.

Pete told the story of a man who began looking for hearts, as emblems of Jesus’ love for him. He found them everywhere—heart-shaped rocks, shells, clouds, a heart-shaped stain on his jeans, even a heart-shaped dinner roll.

Pete told Jesus, I’d like to find tangible evidence of you too.  That very afternoon he spotted a pile of grass clippings on the side of the road, shaped just like a heart. He shared a photo on the sanctuary screen, and sure enough, there was no mistaking it.

Oh Lord, I thought, while finishing a set of push-ups.  That sounds like such fun. But I wonder if my emblem might be different than hearts—something personal. What could I look for?

No sooner did I get up from the mat than there it was: a star—a big one—blazoned on the wheel of our exercise bike. (Jesus made sure I didn’t miss it!)

The verse in Revelation came to mind where Jesus calls himself the bright morning star (22:16). And brief research delightfully expanded my understanding, so I’d appreciate more the stars yet to be discovered.

Just as Venus, the morning star, is always present whether we see it or not, so is Jesus. He is FAITHFUL and TRUE (Revelation 19:11), even when there’s no evidence in the moment.

Just as the morning star gives us assurance of approaching dawn, so Christ gives us assurance of approaching eternal life with him in heaven. He is our HOPE (1 Peter 1:3-5).

And just as the morning star cheers the night-weary soul, so Jesus brings JOY to the discouraged soul (John 17:13).

Each star then, would be a reminder of my Savior’s unfailing faithfulness, the confident hope I have in him, and the ineffable joy he provides.

Since Friday stars have been appearing with surprising frequency.

For example:

A friend posted a photo of her snow-covered garden. Right of center stood a small windmill –with a star on top.

While looking for an old photo on my phone I came across a springtime star from our own backyard.

We watched our Cincinnati Bengals squeak a win over the Titans last Saturday night. I’d never paid attention before to the NFL logo—with its stars.

The Titans’ helmets also include stars. See them surrounding the T?

In our refrigerator are a half-dozen stars or so. . .

. . . if you were to cut the apples horizontally, instead of stem to calyx.

A devotional reading this week just happened to be titled, “Star Gazing.”

In my office you’ll find paper clips shaped like stars. . .

. . . and on a table sits a Czechoslovakian, star-topped creche that I leave out all year.

On a shelf in the family room a crystal star adds sparkle . . .

. . . and even makes rainbows when placed in the sun.

With each star discovery, my heart sings. He is here—with us—revealing his extraordinary presence among the ordinary moments of our lives.

 *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Lord God, after less than a week I’m already rich with stars! You’ve scattered them throughout my days with such creativity.  Thank you that each one reminds me: my faith is not misplaced, my hope is assured, and every joy of life is enhanced—because of your loving presence.

Do you find tangible emblems of Jesus’ intangible love as you go about your day? Tell us about it in the comment section below!

P.S. Here’s a link to Pete Briscoe’s sermon: https://benttree.org/sermon/part-1-everyday-jesus/

(Art & photo credits: http://www.pxhere.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.pixabay.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.wikimedia.org (2); Nancy Ruegg (4); http://www.pxhere.com.)

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One of the psalmists proclaimed, “I will go to the altar of God, to God, my joy and my delight” (Psalm 43:4). The statement raises the question, How do you delight in someone who can’t be seen or touched?

Perhaps we can discover the answer by considering how we delight in the people around us. My father offers a perfect example.

First let me tell you: Dad worked miracles with his numerous tools.  He could fix or build practically anything, as well as paint and wallpaper like a pro.

We were probably among the first to have a built-in sound system.  Dad wired and hooked up a speaker in every room (each with its own on-and-off switch), so anything on the radio or hi-fi could be heard anywhere in the house. 

Dad also built custom-sized furniture:  in the living room–a bookcase (with open shelves above and enclosed shelves below) along with Mom’s music cabinet; in the kitchen—new cupboards and a storage cabinet; in Mom’s and Dad’s bedroom—a large dresser; and for my brother John and me—desks. Each project displayed his careful attention to detail.

But Dad’s admirable qualities weren’t only on display in his home improvement projects.  He demonstrated patience while teaching us how to play Muggins (an old card game), how to use his tools, and how to plant seeds.

He exemplified selflessness by taking us sledding and kite-flying in the park, swimming at the community pool, and biking around town. Dad proved his generosity by volunteering time and effort to help neighbors and fulfill various needs at church.  

When Dad said, “Who wants to pick up some lumber with me?” or “Who wants to go to the hardware store?” John and I were ready to drop whatever we were doing. 

It’s not that these were exciting activities in themselves, it was Dad who made them a special delight–conversing with us as we rode to and from, pointing out items of interest along the way, and holding our small hands in his big ones as we crossed streets.  

Now all this activity and industriousness took place decades ago of course, yet I still take pleasure in remembering his noteworthy undertakings and attributes. In fact, appreciation and admiration for him have only increased over time.  I consider myself privileged to have known Dad and spent time with him.

(Dad and me, mid-1960s)

To know our Heavenly Father we turn to the Bible, of course.  There we learn about his wonderful deeds and miracles. We see God’s glorious character traits on display, including his astounding abilities, his goodness, generosity, and love. We soon find ourselves delighting in all that he is.

We also delight in God as we spend time with him–celebrating what he’s done in our past and praising him for what he’s accomplishing today. We learn important life lessons from him.  And we consider the benefits bestowed by our Heavenly Father, his eternal commitment to us, unfailing love for us, and strength-infusing presence with us.

We find ourselves happily praising God:

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Then we turn all these contemplations into gratitude.

The daily practice of the discipline of gratitude

is the way to daily practice the delight of God.

–Ann Voskamp*

And what will be the result of such a practice?  Pleasurable wonder, resilient faith, and serene contentment—as a start. Doesn’t that sound glorious? Especially during these turbulent times.

In addition, we’ll bring delight to him also (Psalm 147:11). Imagine that!

Perhaps we’d do well to turn Psalm 43:4 into a New Year’s resolution for 2022:

[Daily] I will go to the altar of God,

to God, my joy and my [deep] delight.

____________________

*One Thousand Gifts, 82.

Photo credits: http://www.wikimedia.org (2); http://www.pixnio.com; Henry Mensinger (my grandfather); http://www.heartlight.org (2); http://www.pixabay.com.

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I first heard that title-phrase–thin places–from a woman in my writers’ group. (Thank you, Colleen!) It refers to a location or moment in which we’re more aware of God’s presence, where the veil between heaven and earth seems particularly thin, and we experience a taste of how glorious heaven will be.

Someone might say, “But the Bible says so little about our eternal home.  How do we recognize those thin places?”

A few examples may help.  Think of a time when:

  • You encountered a breath-taking panorama of woodland flowers amid greening trees– on a day of sublime spring weather.  Did your heart fill with praise to the Creator for such beauty and perfection?
  • You found your skin tingling and your eyes stinging in response to music.  It may have been a moving classical piece like Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a rousing hymn such as Great Is Thy Faithfulness, or a soul-touching worship song like Christ Our Hope in Life and Death (Matt Papa/Keith and Kristyn Getty).  And during the moments those lovely notes lingered, were you carried on wings of splendor into the heavenlies?
  • You received an unexpected gift, a note of genuine appreciation, or a sincere affirmation.  Did a wave of bright euphoria sweep through your spirit in response to this delightful love-expression, and did your heart turn to God with overflowing gratitude as the One who inspired it (James 1:17)?
  • A prayer was answered—more perfectly than you imagined—or an over-the-top miracle unexpectedly materialized.  Were you rendered speechless by the glory and wonder of it all?

Just think: 

If we celebrate astonishing beauty in this world . . .

. . . if we’re carried on wings of splendor by events here on earth . . .

. . . and if we experience euphoric moments within imperfect relationships . . .

. . . what pleasures must await in heaven that Christ was willing to die, in order that we might enjoy them with him?

Let the thin places be a reminder:  Though the earth is full of God’s glory (Isaiah 6:3), heaven offers more—much more.

Let that thought lead to praise.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

I praise you, Father, for those times and places I’ve sensed your intimate presence, when my heart felt strangely warmed as if touched by your holy hand.

I praise you for the fullness of joy you provide here and now in spite of my sins and shortcomings.  How precious is your loving kindness, O Lord! 

With happy expectation (a delight of its own), I look forward to the day when you’ll walk me through the veil and I will dwell with you in your glorious realm forever!

(Psalm 23:4; 16:11; 36:7; 23:6)

When or where have you encountered a thin place? Please tell us about it in the comment section below!

Photo credits: http://www.flickr.com; http://www.snappygoat.com; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.pixnio.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.snappygoat.com; http://www.heartlight.org; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.dailyverses.net.

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Thanks to inventor Hans Busch, physicist Ernst Ruska, and electrical engineer Max Knoll, we’ve enjoyed the benefits of their invention, the electron microscope, since 1931.

With its superior magnification power (up to 10,000,000x), scientists can capture images like those below. See if you can identify the object in each photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Photo #1–the cross section of a plant stem; Photo #2–butterfly eggs; Photo #3–butterfly scales; Photo #4–olivine (rock); Photo #5–tomato plant leaf; Photo #6 rose petal.)

 

“The heavens declare the glory of God;

the skies proclaim the work of his hands.”

–Psalm 19:1

 

First, the heavens include our planet, of course.  And everything on the earth and in it also tells of the glory of God.

 

 

Second, what exactly is the glory of God? Theologian Charles Ryrie described it as “the manifestation of any or all of God’s attributes on display.” Puritan preacher Thomas Watson said it’s “the sparkling of the Diety.”  I love that, don’t you?

Just in those few microscope-images above we see evidence of his dazzling wisdom—in the design of a plant stem that moves water and nutrients upward against gravity to the leaves. And then the products produced by photosynthesis in the leaves are taken back through the stem to other parts of the plant, including the roots.

We see evidence of God’s stunning artistry in those butterfly eggs with the eye-catching ridges.

And we see his creative use of shape and color in the butterfly scales, the olivine sample, the tomato leaf, and rose petal.

Billions more examples can be found all across our varied planet, manifesting his goodness in the variety of plants, animals, landforms, and more that he’s given us to use and enjoy.

 

 

I wonder—do you suppose God smiled when he created those tiny eggs with dozens of ridges?  That tomato leaf with hundreds of sprouts? (No wonder they feel rough to the touch!)  That rose petal embroidered with ovals? Did he smile to think about the day when someone would discover the infinitesimal splendor he’d designed eons before?

And yet, even more astounding than the magnificence of God revealed in nature is God’s glory revealed in you and me.

 

 

All of us, then, reflect the glory of the Lord with uncovered faces;

and that same glory, coming from the Lord, who is the Spirit,

transforms us into his likeness in an ever greater degree of glory.

1 Corinthians 3:18 GNT

 

We’re a bit like those watches with phosphorescent numbers. The more light those numbers absorb, the more they glow.

Similarly, the more we bask in God’s presence through prayer, praise, and worship, the more we’ll manifest the glow of his attributes:

 

 

  • his perfect wisdom guiding our life choices, what we do, and what we say
  • his marvelous artistry in our positive imprint on others
  • his divine creativity manifested in the unique shape and color of our gifts and talents
  • his absolute goodness in the blessings we bestow to those around us

 

And imagine our faces, glowing ever brighter as we continually reflect more of the sparkling of our Diety.

 

 

What could be more delightful and satisfying?

 

Photo credits:  http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.wikimedia.com (4); http://www.rd.com (2); http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.snappygoat.com; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.maxpixel.freegreatpicture.

 

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“Nancy—kitchen window!” Steve stage whispered, loud enough for me to hear.

And while dashing from the office I cried, “Coming!” because his tone meant Steve had spotted something unusual in the backyard or the strip of woods beyond that.

“Look down in the thicket to the right of the black walnut tree,” he directed. I carefully scanned the undergrowth but noticed nothing out of the ordinary.

“You don’t see four little eyes looking out?” Steve asked.

I did not.

“Stand here,” he directed, and stepped back so I could position myself directly in front of him. Then he leaned in, raised his hand to my eye level, and pointed. “Look up a foot from the base of the trunk, scan two feet to the right, under that diagonal branch, then look for four bright spots close together.”

I directed my eyes down the sight line he gave me and followed his instructions. Sure enough, two little foxes were peering out from thick foliage that provided excellent cover. But with Steve’s guidance, I was able to share with him that exceptional moment. We’ve never seen fox kits since.

God also invites us to stand close to him—not just for moments of exceptional blessing, although he offers plenty of those. No, our Heavenly Father offers us life support in the form of strength, help, serenity and more when we draw near to him. The question becomes how—how do we move in close to God? How do we best avail ourselves of all he has to offer?

Perhaps the best way to begin is:

Say yes to becoming well-acquainted with God.

As Steve explained how to spot the foxes, I never once thought he might suddenly say, “Ha-ha! Made you look!” He’s not one to play silly pranks; he has proven himself trustworthy.

The best place to become acquainted with God and his trustworthiness is in his Word. Years ago a Bible teacher recommended that whatever passage we may be reading, look for evidence of God’s attributes and think how they’re manifested in our lives. It’s a delightful, uplifting exercise.

Some are obvious. In the psalms, for example, we find many statements describing him. He is:

  • A shield around us (3:3)
  • Righteous (7:17)
  • Always loving (13:5)
  • Our rock, fortress and deliverer (18:2)
  • Our Shepherd who provides, protects, and guides (23:1-6)

Other attributes are less obvious to identify. But in the opening verses of Romans, for example, we find evidence that God is:

  • A purpose-setter for each of us (1:1)
  • a promise-keeper (1:2)
  • holy—separated from all other beings because of his perfection (v. 4)
  • gracious (v. 5)
  • our source of peace (v. 7)

And as we consider how each attribute has been manifested in our lives we soon discover: to know God is to trust God (Psalm 9:10).

Say yes to practicing his presence.

Identify stops throughout each day—moments to refocus attention on our Heavenly Father through praise, gratitude and prayer. For me that includes a quiet time each morning, exercising to Christian music, worship at the window while waiting for the microwave, and reciting scripture before falling asleep.

When I taught school, I would use the trips between my classroom and the gym, library, computer lab, etc. for moments of worship.

Say no to more screen time or whatever competes for your attention yet accomplishes little.

Years ago a young couple in our church decided to finish their college degrees—even though both worked full-time and they had two young children. How did they find time to study?

W. and T. went to bed at 8:00 when their kids did, then got up at 3:00 or 4:00 to complete assignments and prepare for tests. With discipline and perseverance they achieved their goal.

We can do the same to achieve our goal of knowing God: make time to stand close with him in his Word, in his presence.

James the brother of Jesus wrote:

Notice God leaves the choice to us; we have to make the first move.

The day of the fox kit sighting my response to Steve could have been, “Too busy—can’t come!” But I would have missed an exceptional moment.

I’m so glad my response was, “Coming!”

________________________

Other posts that address these topics:

Photo credits:  Nancy Ruegg; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.pixy.org; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.canva.com (3).

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“Be still and know that I am God (1).

Be still and know.

Be still.

Be.

It starts with ‘be.’

Just be, dear one.”

–Shauna Neiquist (2)

 

Moments of quiet, contemplative silence are rare for many people. We’ve been swept up in the cultural norms of productivity: use time wisely and stay on task. Better yet, multi-task.

But there is tremendous power and blessing in stillness.

Quietness of spirit:

  • creates space for us to hear God’s voice
  • builds bonds of trust between us and God
  • accelerates our understanding of God
  • revitalizes our spirits
  • brings the peace of God to our hearts

Surely these are desirable outcomes that warrant a few minutes each day to just be—in the presence of God.

 

 

The question becomes, how do we achieve such a goal when other responsibilities clamor loudly for our attention?

Like any priority, we must make time.   Begin with five minutes; you’ll soon be craving more.

Choose a secluded place. For years I sat at our kitchen table early in the morning, before anyone else in the house got up. Now I enjoy the luxury of a private home office. But when the weather allows, I revel in sitting on the deck with God, surrounded by his creation.

Not everyone has such options. I know one young mother who has chosen the bathroom as her place of stillness!

Put your God-given imagination to work. We considered the gift of imagination a couple of weeks ago, in a post titled: Oh, What We’re MissingYou can borrow my visualization if you like–the one I use if quiet time must take place indoors:

 

 

Picture a peaceful lake shrouded in morning mist.  On a dock are two Adirondack chairs, one for you and one for Jesus. He’s already sitting in his, because he loves to spend quality time with his children.  As you settle in your chair, reach out your hand for his. Just sit in companionable silence for a moment.

Another option: picture a place where you’ve experienced Jesus’ peace before, and imagine yourself there with him again.

Be physically still.  Relax.  The original Hebrew word translated “be still” can also be translated “cease striving.” Take several slow, deep breaths, and prayerfully set aside the to-list and concerns.

Focus on Jesus and contemplate his attributes. When distracting thoughts pop up (and they will!), add them to the to-do list or the prayer list as needed (keep them handy!), then turn back to Jesus.

Remember:  He understands how hard it is for us to sit quietly with him; he does not expect perfection. What he does treasure is our persistence to seek him (3).

 

 

Listen. “Deep within the center of the soul is a chamber of peace where God lives and where, if we will enter it and quiet all the other sounds, we can hear his gentle whisper (1 Kings 19:12)” (4).

You may wish to keep a journal and pen nearby as God reveals impressions in your heart.  Perhaps it will just be one word or a single thought at first. Write it down. From that starting point you just might grow a paragraph, or even a page of God-thoughts.

But don’t worry if you hear no whisper. “In God’s presence is peace (Isaiah 26:3), joy (Psalm 16:11), and strength (Proverbs 18:10)—whether words are exchanged or not.

In A Quiet Place in a Crazy World, Joni Eareckson Tada wrote about her Uncle Vince, who had constructed a prayer room complete with fake paneling, some stained glass from an old church, and a couple of old, musty tapestries. The only furniture was a small prayer kneeler and a Bible stand.

 

 

Joni remembers thinking it was stuffy and tacky. Years later she realized how wise Uncle Vince was to have a special place where he met Jesus. That was undoubtedly the reason he prayed on the golf course and on his hikes with Joni and her family.

“Uncle Vince encountered God every place, because he had one place,” she wrote (5).

How we need such a place…

…to just be.

It starts with be.

 

 

Notes:

  1. Psalm 46:10
  2. Shauna Neiquist, Present over Perfect
  3. Sarah Young, Jesus Always
  4. L. B. Cowman, Streams in the Desert
  5. Joni Eareckson Tada, A Quiet Place in a Crazy World

 

Photo credits:  http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.maxpixel.net; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.pexels.com; http://www.pixabay.com.

 

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“I made soup,” she says.

I peer into the pot to see a chicken leg, a whole apple, a cluster of green beans and an ice cream cone.

“Eat some!” she coaxes.

I spoon a bite and assure her, “Oh, this is delicious.”

She smiles broadly. “I make dessert.” And two-year old Maarit (Mah-rit), our granddaughter, trots back to her child-size kitchen to bake a plastic cake or pie.

 

 

It’s such fun to watch little ones enjoy their vivid imaginations, and it comes so naturally to them. No one has to teach toddlers how to pretend; they just do. But as we grow and leave childish things behind, most of us abandon our imaginings.

Oh, what we’re missing.

In a post a couple of years ago (Oh, Say Can You See), we looked at three ways an active imagination can positively impact our faith, helping us to better understand God, add insight to Bible reading, and see more in this incredible world he’s created.

Today let’s consider three more ways. 

  1. With an active imagination, we are more likely to see people and situations the way God sees them. 

In his Word he calls us to see people for what they could be and will be as they avail themselves of his transforming power. We’re also called to see situations with forward-looking faith in God’s ability to do far more than we can imagine (1).

By contrast, our thoughts too often veer to the negative. We forget what the Apostle Paul told us in Philippians 4:8—to think on excellent and praiseworthy things.

 

 

C. S. Lewis helped a woman do just that in a letter he wrote as she lay in a hospital contemplating the possibility of death:

“Think of yourself,” he said, “just as a seed patiently waiting in the earth: waiting to come up a flower in the Gardener’s good time, up into the real world, the real waking. I suppose that our whole present life, looked back on from there, will seem only a drowsy half-waking. We are here in the land of dreams. But the cock-crow is coming” (2).

Surely Lewis’s words stirred fresh hope in her heart as he awakened her imagination to a new perspective. In your mind’s eye, can you see excellent, praiseworthy events unfolding in the situation that most concerns you? Allow such imaginings to provide fresh hope for your heart.

  1. With an active imagination we can envision the kingdom of God that exists here and now, even though hidden from view. 

The very nature of faith requires imagination, because the kingdom of God cannot be perceived by the senses. It exists invisibly among and within those who invite King Jesus to rule in their lives (3). But our imaginations can help us access the invisible through the visible as we contemplate:

 

 

  • The glory of God in the splendor of creation
  • The rule of God in the organization of the universe
  • The goodness of God in our numerous blessings
  • The wisdom of God in his precepts that usher in abundant life
  • The power of God, as he transforms misery to joy, trouble to triumph, and even bitterness to forgiveness
  1. With an active imagination we can experience God more fully. 

For example, what if we:

 

 

  • Imagine God sitting with us as we pray, our hands pressed between his, his head leaning in close to hear our every word. Would it be easier to sense his presence, stay focused, and pray with more intensity?
  • Imagine God at our right hand as we work through our days (Psalm 121:5). He is our ever-present Protector, Guide, and Help. Might such visualization reduce stress? Could mindless tasks become sublime opportunities to enjoy his presence and access his strength?
  • Imagine God on his throne as we worship, with his dazzling radiance signifying splendor, and his voluminous robe representing power (4). Might the joy and passion of our worship-experience be enhanced as we contemplate his magnificence?

 

 

You might remember that Jesus held children in great regard. He suggested that adults become like little children to enter the kingdom of God (Matthew 18:1-5). Granted, his emphasis was upon trust, loyalty and humility. But responding to him with the imagination of a child as well will help us fly beyond the stars.

 

 

I don’t want to miss that. I’m guessing you don’t either.    

 

Notes:

  1. Philippians 1:6; Ephesians 3:20
  2. The Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis, vol. 3: Narnia, Cambridge, and Joy, 1950-1963, [2007]
  3. Hebrews 11:1; Luke 17:21
  4. Ezekiel 1:27; Isaiah 6:1-2

 

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Father and son take a walk down the road in front of their farm. The father has long been a nature enthusiast, especially interested in trees. He studies the tall oaks bordering the road that his grandfather planted long ago.

He knows that oak trees are among the longest-living organisms on the planet, that large specimens can consume up to one hundred gallons of water per day, and drop 10,000 acorns in a good year.

The father delights in those stalwart oaks; his desire is to keep them strong. More than once he’s called an arborist for advice on their care.

The son, on the other hand, watches the cars and trucks go by. He guesses every make as it comes into view, and he’s usually right. As far as the boy’s concerned, each one is a work of art.

 

 

He especially hopes a sports car will pass, so he can enjoy the rev of its large engine. And the whole while he’s dreaming of the day he will sit behind the wheel of a car or truck, wind whipping at his hair as he follows the road to his destiny.

Dad hardly sees the cars; the son barely notices the trees.

What a person delights in captures his attention and impacts his desires.

King David asserted that truth long ago, but in matters of the spiritual dimension rather than physical.

 

 

“Take delight in the Lord,” David wrote, “and he will give you the desires of your heart” (Psalm 37:4).

David was not referring to desires for possessions, like sports cars or even healthy trees.  That interpretation doesn’t fit the context of the rest of the psalm.

David stresses that we’re to:

  • Trust in God (vs. 3, 5)
  • Delight in him (v. 4)
  • Commit our way to the Lord (v. 5)
  • Be still before him (v. 7)
  • Wait patiently for him (v. 7)

Those are the signposts of spiritual maturity: 1) to trust God even through the storms of life, 2) to delight in all that God is and all that God does no matter our circumstances, 3) to submit ourselves to his all-wise ways, 4) to remain calm and restful in his care, and 5) wait patiently for him to act.

 

 

As we become proficient in each of these areas (and it is a growing process), we often find our desires changing. Over time God molds his desires in our hearts—desires that provide true fulfillment, contentment, and peace.

However, we can accelerate the growing process and augment our delight in God.

Consider how the father and son grew in their delight of trees and cars. They learned. Each had made a study of their favorite subject. The father knew trees; the son knew cars.

We can increase our delight in God by:

  • Pursuing gratitude as an avenue of delight in him
  • Becoming a sleuth among everyday events, tracing the evidence of his love, wisdom, and power
  • Celebrating his blessings
  • Soaking in the Word of God, discovering his attributes and involvement in the lives of humankind
  • Practicing his presence throughout the day–acknowledging him, talking to him, and listening

 

“If we will let our hearts be filled with God till it runs over with delight,

then the Lord Himself will take care that we shall not want for any good things…

We may have disappointments; but if these bring us nearer to the Lord,

they are things to be prized exceedingly,

for they will in the end secure to us the fulfillment of all our right desires.”

–Charles Spurgeon, Faith’s Checkbook

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

That is my prayer, Heavenly Father, to be filled with the delight of YOU, sensitive to the perfect desires you have for me. Then I will know fullness of joy.

 

There are many ways to take joy in God.  What fills your heart with the delight of him?  Please share in the comment section below!

 

Photo credits:  http://www.maxpixel.net; http://www.pixnio.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.pixabay.com.

 

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