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Archive for the ‘Worship’ Category

“The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want” (Psalm 23:1 KJV).

Many of us memorized those words as children. And some of us may have thought, “Wow! That means God will give me whatever I want!”

So we prayed for new bicycles, the latest gadgets, and swimming pools in our backyards—absolutely certain that if God gave us these hearts’ desires, we’d be truly satisfied.

Some of our prayers were answered affirmatively. A new bicycle with sparkling spokes actually materialized by the Christmas tree. Or Aunt Kate heard the pleas for Mattell’s Magical Music Thing, and sent it as a birthday gift.

But as the years went by, the wise and introspective among us realized:

1. When one desire is fulfilled, another quickly takes its place.

Years ago I heard that a famous actress had accumulated seven houses, each one a different style from the others. Why? Because moving from one to another eased her boredom. (I wonder how long it took to become discontented with House #4, or #5, or #6, before she hired an architect to start the next?)

2. God isn’t in the business of making wishes come true.

Psalm 23:1 doesn’t mean: “I’m one of God’s flock! I’m gonna live on Easy Street!”

If he did grant every whim, we’d soon become self-centered and spoiled.

Perhaps a clarifying interpretation of the opening scripture would be: “God is my loving Care-Giver. All that I enjoy in my relationship with him far outweighs anything this world has to offer. I really don’t need another single thing.”

Ah, to be as soul-satisfied as King David, the author of this psalm!  How can we become that contented?

One place to begin is with gratitude and praise.

Think of all we enjoy as a result of our relationship with God.  Peace, joy, and provision quickly come to mind.

Here are a few more:

  • Companionship with a perfect Friend—every moment of every day–into eternity.  He is always listening, always watchful, always diligent.
  • Hope. No situation is beyond the control of our Almighty God.
  • Settledness, because he is in control, and “makes good things even out of hard times” (Erica Hale).
  • Truth. We don’t have to muddle through life like a do-it-yourselfer with no instruction manual. “The unfolding of [God’s] words gives light; it gives understanding to the simple” (Psalm 119:130).

The bottom-line is this: No possession or position, no place or person on earth can fill our hearts with contentment.

3. True satisfaction flourishes when we affirm that in God we have all we need.

Remember Jesus’ invitation in Matthew 11:28?

Are you weary of the dissatisfaction that results from striving for the next desire?  Are you burdened by unfulfilled wishes and dreams?

Come to Jesus.  Count the scores of blessings he’s already provided in the past, is currently providing this very moment, and has already prepared in the glory of heaven yet to come.

Cultivate true satisfaction in your heart with gratitude and praise!

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

What helps you cultivate true satisfaction?  Please share in the Comments section below!

Art & photo credits: http://www.canva.com; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.rawpixel.com; http://www.wikimedia.org.

(Revised and reblogged from 7-10-14 while we enjoy house guests.)

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Some time ago, wise-and-insightful blogger Michele Morin (at Living Our Days) shared that she was journaling through some of the old hymns. I imagined her digging into the meaning of some of the rich language and theology, personalizing the truths, and/or using them as the basis for prayer.

Putting pen or pencil to paper in such a way slows down our thinking, allowing wonderful blessings to emerge:

  • Increased knowledge of God and his Word
  • Clarity of understanding
  • A record of discoveries
  • A record of faith deposits for later encouragement
  • Renewal of the mind
  • Augmented intimacy with God

If writing a meditation sounds intimidating, adopt the attitude of Isaac Asimov:

“Writing to me is simply thinking through my fingers.”

Isaac Asimov

For Christian journalers, writing can be worshiping through our fingers.

But how do we even begin such a process? Try Anne Sexton’s approach:

When we invite Jesus into our lives, the Spirit of God takes up residence within our spirits (1). We can put our ears down close to our souls and listen hard for him to guide our thoughts and lead us to the insights he would have us discover.

And then, we fill our pages with the breathings of our hearts (2).

The following is an example of a journal entry, based on the first verse of the hymn, “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing”(3). The next four images contain the lyrics.

You, oh God, are the Source of every blessing—every provision, every answered prayer, every wise decision, every creative idea, every moment of joy. All good and perfect gifts come from you (4).

Out of your lavish generosity, blessings flow continually from your hand. May I be quick to praise you for each one as they demonstrate your lovingkindness.

This fount of blessing includes your mercy also. I praise you for your forgiveness, undeserving as I am. Thank you for looking upon me with compassion and tenderness in spite of my weaknesses, failures, and sins.

And I praise you that your mercy never ends! You are faithful to forgive me every time I come to you in repentance. Such grace is beyond comprehension. Yes, I want to sing songs of loudest praise, to honor you rightly for all you’ve done for me and continue to do.

Perhaps if I had the voice of an angel and knew the songs of heaven I could sing the full praise you deserve!

Nevertheless, I celebrate your name(s)—Shepherd, Lord of Peace, God of Grace, Father of Compassion and more. I glory in all the attributes indicated by each one. And I remember: the one trait that is part of them all: your unfailing love.

Thank you for loving me, in spite of my shortcomings; thank you for redeeming me from the consequences of my sins so I might enjoy you forever!

Should you decide to journal through a hymn or praise song, remember: perfection is not the goal, getting to know God better and worship him more passionately are the aims.

An added benefit? Our meditations will positively impact our words and actions (5).

Notes:

  1. 1 Corinthians 3:16
  2. based on a quote from William Wordsworth
  3. by Robert Robinson, text adapted by Margaret Clarkson
  4. James 1:17
  5. Joshua 1:8

Photo credits: http://www.pxfuel.com; http://www.canva.com; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.canva.com (2); http://www.flicker.com; http://www.freebibleimages.org.

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One of the psalmists proclaimed, “I will go to the altar of God, to God, my joy and my delight” (Psalm 43:4). The statement raises the question, How do you delight in someone who can’t be seen or touched?

Perhaps we can discover the answer by considering how we delight in the people around us. My father offers a perfect example.

First let me tell you: Dad worked miracles with his numerous tools.  He could fix or build practically anything, as well as paint and wallpaper like a pro.

We were probably among the first to have a built-in sound system.  Dad wired and hooked up a speaker in every room (each with its own on-and-off switch), so anything on the radio or hi-fi could be heard anywhere in the house. 

Dad also built custom-sized furniture:  in the living room–a bookcase (with open shelves above and enclosed shelves below) along with Mom’s music cabinet; in the kitchen—new cupboards and a storage cabinet; in Mom’s and Dad’s bedroom—a large dresser; and for my brother John and me—desks. Each project displayed his careful attention to detail.

But Dad’s admirable qualities weren’t only on display in his home improvement projects.  He demonstrated patience while teaching us how to play Muggins (an old card game), how to use his tools, and how to plant seeds.

He exemplified selflessness by taking us sledding and kite-flying in the park, swimming at the community pool, and biking around town. Dad proved his generosity by volunteering time and effort to help neighbors and fulfill various needs at church.  

When Dad said, “Who wants to pick up some lumber with me?” or “Who wants to go to the hardware store?” John and I were ready to drop whatever we were doing. 

It’s not that these were exciting activities in themselves, it was Dad who made them a special delight–conversing with us as we rode to and from, pointing out items of interest along the way, and holding our small hands in his big ones as we crossed streets.  

Now all this activity and industriousness took place decades ago of course, yet I still take pleasure in remembering his noteworthy undertakings and attributes. In fact, appreciation and admiration for him have only increased over time.  I consider myself privileged to have known Dad and spent time with him.

(Dad and me, mid-1960s)

To know our Heavenly Father we turn to the Bible, of course.  There we learn about his wonderful deeds and miracles. We see God’s glorious character traits on display, including his astounding abilities, his goodness, generosity, and love. We soon find ourselves delighting in all that he is.

We also delight in God as we spend time with him–celebrating what he’s done in our past and praising him for what he’s accomplishing today. We learn important life lessons from him.  And we consider the benefits bestowed by our Heavenly Father, his eternal commitment to us, unfailing love for us, and strength-infusing presence with us.

We find ourselves happily praising God:

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Then we turn all these contemplations into gratitude.

The daily practice of the discipline of gratitude

is the way to daily practice the delight of God.

–Ann Voskamp*

And what will be the result of such a practice?  Pleasurable wonder, resilient faith, and serene contentment—as a start. Doesn’t that sound glorious? Especially during these turbulent times.

In addition, we’ll bring delight to him also (Psalm 147:11). Imagine that!

Perhaps we’d do well to turn Psalm 43:4 into a New Year’s resolution for 2022:

[Daily] I will go to the altar of God,

to God, my joy and my [deep] delight.

____________________

*One Thousand Gifts, 82.

Photo credits: http://www.wikimedia.org (2); http://www.pixnio.com; Henry Mensinger (my grandfather); http://www.heartlight.org (2); http://www.pixabay.com.

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The first Christmas carol ever composed rarely appears in a collection of Advent songs.  But you will find it in the Bible, Luke chapter one.  It’s Mary’s song, shared with her cousin Elizabeth soon after she arrived at the older woman’s home.

Using much scripture, Mary artfully wove this prayer-song to praise God for his work in her life and in the world-at-large, especially now that the Messiah would soon be born.

Mary’s prayer is often referred to as the Magnificat, because in a number of translations it begins, “My soul magnifies the Lord,” as if Mary is holding up a magnifying glass to God’s attributes while she draws attention to each one.

I too have seen God’s attributes at work, and have experienced countless blessings.  While contemplating Mary’s song recently, I wondered: could I compose a Magnificat? What follows is the result.

My soul proclaims your greatness, O Lord . . . (Luke 1:46 HCSB)

. . . on display in the wonders of creation, events that defy explanation, and in the transformed lives of people—including my own. 

“You are the God who performs miracles; you display your power among the peoples”[1] as needs are met, disasters avoided, and the way forward provided. You alone are omnipotent, with all resources at your disposal.

My spirit rejoices in God my Savior (v. 47 NIV).

I praise you for saving me from the consequences of my sin through the sacrifice of your Son.  Upon my last breath, you will take me to heaven to live with you forever. In that moment I’ll be healed of all ailments and released from all adversity.

Until that day, you gladly save me from worry, fear, discouragement and stress when I trust you and follow your ways. Thank you, dear Father!

You have looked [with loving care] on the humble state of your maidservant (v. 48 AMP).

By the world’s standards I’m a nobody–no wealth, no fame, no power. Little do some know my true status, the daughter of the King of the universe, and the numerous delights I enjoy as a result:

  • glorious moments in your presence
  • generous gifts not even asked for
  • friendships with your other children (augmented by your involvement and influence)
  • your frequent intervention in difficult circumstances, as only a powerful King could arrange

From one generation to another you have demonstrated your mercy (v. 50 GNT).

I think of my grandparents, each of whom you sustained and helped through difficulty.  I think of my parents who also experienced your faithfulness as they were faithful to you.

And now we can testify of your gracious kindness. You have dealt compassionately, especially in times of distress.

Your mighty power has been on display (v. 51 GWT) . . .

 . . . through healings that doctors can’t explain, needs met in miraculous ways, monetary gifts arriving just in time, and moments of desperation turned around in an instant.

“You satisfy the hungry with good things” (v. 53, HCSB). 

The list is lavishly long: your undeserved love, comforting presence, inexplicable peace, fullness of joy, heartening encouragement, fulfilling purpose, undying hope, sure promises, abundant provision, generous blessings, wise counsel, abiding strength—to mention a few! “In your giving we have a sea without a shore.”[2]

My God, the King, I exalt you for your glorious attributes,

and will praise your name forever and ever.

 Your ways are absolutely holy—no one is like you. 

You are the God who performs miracles!

Your power is on display in glorious ways all over the earth,

yet you have chosen to do great things for me and those I love.

My heart is filled with joy!

(Psalm 145:1; 77:13-14; 126:3)


[1] Psalm 77:14

[2] Herbert Lockyer, Seasons of the Lord, 255.

Photo credits: http://www.pixabay.com (twstringer); http://www.pxhere.com (dorothe); http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.pixaby.com (Simon); http://www.wikimedia.com (VinceTraveller); http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.pixabay.com (nastya_gepp); http://www.pix4free.

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Sanders’ statement above begs the question:  where might seeing eyes focus?  No doubt there are a number of areas, but for today, let’s look at—or rather, see (!)–just two:

Seeing Eyes Focus on the Evidence of God

First, all areas of science from astronomy to zoology are grounded upon such laws of nature as gravity, the 24-hour cycle of light and dark, and the evaporation / condensation cycle of water.  Such regularities beg the question, why is everything in the universe so structured?

“There is no logical necessity for a universe that obeys rules,”[1] and yet it clearly does. Someone had to give order to what would otherwise be chaos.

Second, the more cytologists study the structure of cells, the more complexities they discover. Even so, five years ago they did create a cell with 473 genes.  However, they have a long way to go to match God’s engineering skills.  The single-cell organism, E. coli bacteria, contains 4,000 genes; a human cell, 30,000.[2] 

Third, all around us are examples of God’s artistry, but, “for lack of attention, a thousand forms of loveliness elude us every day.”[3]  Such loveliness—right outside our door–includes:

  • A sunrise back-lighting the tree-tops
  • Ethereal mist swathing the woods’ undergrowth
  • Dewdrop jewels sparkling in the grass
  • Scampering squirrels making thin tree limbs dance
  • Hydrangeas transforming their finery from shell pink to deep salmon

And seeing eyes turn heavenward in worship.

Seeing Eyes See People

Perhaps a true story will illustrate best:

There I stood over my son’s open suitcase, staring at the tag on his new school uniform pants. They were the wrong size. J. needed those pants the very next morning when all the sixth graders of his school would head to Washington D. C. for a three-day field trip. 

We’d ordered those pants the previous week when the uniform store didn’t have his size in stock.  They’d arrived on Saturday, but I never checked the tag till that moment. A glance at my watch confirmed:  if we left immediately, we might arrive at Harris Prep Shop (a half hour away) before it closed.

But a long night lay ahead with another hour added to the agenda. And what if they still didn’t have J.’s size?  Several scenarios played in my mind while I called the store.

Mrs. Harris apologized for the mix-up, then informed me a shipment had arrived that morning, including pants. I told her we’d get there ASAP, but it would take thirty minutes.

“Wait a minute,” she replied.  Her voice became muffled while she spoke to someone else, then came back to me. 

“Mrs. Ruegg?  There’s another mom here from your school, and she says she’ll pick up the pants for you. You can return the others another time.”

“Oh—that would be fantastic!” I cried.  “What’s her address?  I’ll meet her there.”

More muffled conversation ensued, then Mrs. Harris relayed, “She says, give her your address and she’ll drop them off.”

An hour of precious time was suddenly regained by this thoughtful mother.  Granted, she didn’t see my eyes widen upon discovering the size-tag, or my brows furrow as I fretted over several less-than-satisfactory solutions to our dilemma.

This woman was able to see me across the miles with the eyes of empathy and responded with gracious kindness.

Now that kind of sight is rare indeed.


[1] https://www.everystudent.com/features/is-there-a-god.html

[2] https://kenboa.org/apologetics/scientific-evidence-of-gods-existence/; https://www.nist.gov/news-events/news/2021/03/scientists-create-simple-synthetic-cell-grows-and-divides-normally

[3] Evelyn Underhill

Art & photo credits: http://www.maxpixel.net; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.pixaby.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.publicdomainpictures.net; http://www.facebook.com; http://www.piqsels.com.

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(a personalized psalm, based on Psalm 143)

O Lord, we are in serious trouble as a nation.  Selfish gain and a lust for power have taken precedence over the common good.  E pluribus unum is deteriorating into tribalism; “In God We Trust” is being replaced by “In US We Trust.”

Have mercy upon us, O God!  Our arch enemy Satan is wreaking havoc across our land; numerous problems vie for attention. Among them: soaring crime rates in our cities, increasing drug addiction and homelessness, failing schools, mounting national debt, escalating inflation, and threats to our national security.

If I focus on these monumental problems, my spirit is overwhelmed, my heart overcome with dismay (2).

BUT!  THIS I KNOW:

You are a faithful God who never leaves his children to fend for themselves.  You never forget, never fail, and never falter (3).

I KNOW you are a righteous God of complete integrity and consistency, always acting in accordance to the perfections of your character, always at the right time.

I KNOW you are a reliable God.  Scripture, history, the lives of present-day saints, and events in my own life provide countless examples of your miraculous care for your children.  As I consider all your hands have accomplished my spirit is lifted, my faith increased.

There is no trouble so great, no situation so hopeless that you cannot resolve it.  If you do not provide rescue, you supply ample strength and courage to endure.  Even more wondrous, during times of distress you grant heightened awareness of your glorious presence, your infinite peace, and radiant joy.

Therefore, I not only cry out for rescue from ruin; I cry out for you.  Like a little child who raises her hands for a loved one to pick her up and hold her close, I desire intimacy with you, the only One who can help me and keep me from falling (4).

I KNOW you are a loving God of never-failing devotion. I can trust you for guidance and support, whatever the future holds.  And as I bask in the warmth of your lavish love, anxiety and fear will melt away.  Your love is active, seeking my good more than my pleasure, working toward my divine transformation more than my comfort. And as your wisdom grows within me, I see the supreme value of the former over the latter.

I KNOW you are my God.  I’m in awe that you, the Creator and Sustainer of the universe, are my Heavenly Father! You are the almighty One leading everything to the conclusion you ordained before time began–by the same power, wisdom, and love with which you made it (4). Yet in spite of that power, in spite of your perfection and majestic glory, you desire to be my constant Companion and Friend. 

So I humbly ask:

Hear me as I pray (v. 1). 

Show me the way I should go (v. 8).

Hide me in you (v. 9).

Teach me and lead me (v. 10).

Bring me out of trouble and into the shelter of your refuge  (v. 11; Psalm 46:1-3).

For America I pray we’d corporately look to you for the way we should go. Bring us out of our troubles and rescue us from our enemies, including those that war within the spirit.  Preserve us, I pray (vs. 9, 11).

Amen.

Notes:

  1. Psalm 143:4 AMP and HCSB
  2. A. W. Pink
  3. Psalm 54:4 CEV
  4. Julian of Norwich

Photo credits: http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.picryl.com; http://www.depositphotos.com; http://www.pxfuel.com; http://www.pixabaycom; http://www.dailyverses.net (3); http://www.wikimedia.com.

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This quote became the basis for a post in September 2017 titled Expect Great Things.  At the time Murray’s words were speaking new encouragement into my prayer life.  I copied the quote on a 3 x 5 and have kept it in my prayer box ever since.

Now four years later, I must confess my worship of God in his glory has become a bit stale.  I find myself using the same words to repeat such attributes as:  his wisdom to solve problems, his goodness to provide blessing, and his power to generate miracles. My loving Father deserves so much more than rote repetition.

Then a new idea occurred to me, likely inspired by the Spirit himself.  What if I devoted each day of the week to a different aspect of God’s glory?  And what if I prepared a separate page in my quiet time notebook for each attribute and began collecting appropriate scriptures, quotes, personal thoughts—different praise-starters for each day so my worship might remain fresh?

To that end, I chose the following attributes to focus on first:

  • Sunday—God’s power and greatness
  • Monday—God’s splendorous names
  • Tuesday—God’s wisdom and counsel
  • Wednesday—God’s love
  • Thursday—God’s faithfulness
  • Friday—God’s goodness
  • Saturday—God’s grace and compassion

To keep this post of reasonable length, I’ll just include what I’ve collected so far for Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday.

Sunday—God’s power and greatness

  • Scripture:  “Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness (Psalm 150:2).  What acts of God’s power and greatness have I witnessed or heard about recently?
  • Quote:  “When we are facing the impossible, we can count upon the God of the impossible” (Amy Carmichael).  Praise him for several impossibilities miraculously rendered—perhaps a need met, a problem rectified, a healing provided.  
  • Prayer starter: I praise you, O God, for the magnificence of your power—to create everything in the universe out of nothing, to keep it all functioning smoothly, to be present everywhere at the same time, to bring good out of every situation for those who love you, to change lives for the better, . . .  

Monday—God’s splendorous names and titles

Scripture: “Let the name of the Lord be praised, both now and forevermore” (Psalm 113:2).  Choose one or two to focus on each Monday.

  • Prayer starter for one name:  I praise you Jehovah-Nissi, The Lord My Banner. You are my focal point of hope and encouragement for every situation. How comforting to know that all of your attributes are always at work on behalf of your people.  I praise you for your marvelous promises of strength, provision, wisdom, and peace. . .

Tuesday—God’s wisdom and counsel

  • Scripture: “I will bless the Lord who has counseled me” (Psalm 16:7a NIV).  How has he counseled me recently as well as others?
  • Quote:  Praise God that his “infinite wisdom directs every event, brings order out of confusion, and light out of darkness, and, to those who love God, causes all things, whatever be their present aspect and apparent tendency, to work together for good”—J. L. Dagg.  Such glorious truths to hold close at heart! What else might I add?
  • Prayer Starter:  I also praise you, O God, for the gift of scripture to guide us through life with your truth and wisdom.  I praise you for your Holy Spirit who increases our understanding and enlightens our souls.  You never turn away anyone who seeks your wisdom! . . .

And what will be the result of such worship that enthusiastically affirms God’s transcendence?  Transformation—transformation of our prayers, transformation of our lives.

.

Nothing we do is more powerful

or more life-changing than praising God.

— Stormie Omartian

*from The Power of God’s Names

Image credits: http://www.canva.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.pxfuel.com; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.pxfuel.com.

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“This world can be saved from political chaos and collapse

by one thing only, and that is _______________.”

How would you fill in the blank?

A. Wise leadership?

B. Liberal generosity?

C. Open-hearted worship?

D. Unconditional love?

Before we consider the answer, let me introduce the author of that quote, William Temple, who served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1942-1944.

220px-WTemple

You may remember those were three of the six years when Great Britain and her allies fought against the Nazis. In fact, when Bishop Temple took office, England faced the real possibility of a German invasion.

Temple did not cloister himself within the church walls. He worked to aid Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, supported a negotiated peace (instead of the unconditional surrender that Allied leaders desired), and traveled frequently throughout England, encouraging British citizens to take courage in their fight against evil and hold onto hope in God.

It was part of a radio broadcast during those grim days of German air attacks that Bishop Temple spoke about “one thing only.” His last word of that statement was Answer C, worship.

Now how did he expect a bit of hymn singing, scripture reading, and a sermon in church to make a difference?

He didn’t. Bishop Temple was referring more to personal worship than public.

His own definition of worship clarifies what he had in mind:

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Imagine a world where each person worshiped God by:

  • Submitting his conscience to God as David did, when he asked for a pure heart and steadfast spirit (Psalm 104:10).
  • Seeking to fill his mind with the truth of God’s Word, recognizing that all his commands are trustworthy (Psalm 119:86a).
  • Replacing negative, impure, unkind, and prejudiced thoughts with whatever is true, noble, pure, and admirable (Philippians 4:8).
  • Availing himself of God’s love and then imitating him—his mercy to forgive, his grace to provide, his benevolence to bless (Ephesians 5:1).
  • Putting aside selfish desires and focusing effort on what God would have him achieve (1 Corinthians 10:31).

Surely there would be less animosity and power-grabbing in our world.

But I can’t point fingers at others when the truth is, have yet to experience the fullness of what Bishop Temple asserted. An honest inventory of my life includes:

  • A heart not consistently pure, and a spirit not always steadfast.
  • Faith that sometimes falters in God’s trustworthy commands.
  • Thoughts that can grovel in the negative.
  • Choices and actions that do not always reflect God’s love.
  • Selfishness that still rears its ugly head.

On the other hand, guilt is not what God intended as the motivation for worship.

No, he designed it to be a delight, not a duty. He wants to expand our joy (Psalm 16:11), provide rest and refuge (Psalm 91:1-2), bestow his strength (Psalm 138:2-3), and more–through the acts of worship. We short-change ourselves by neglecting its pleasure each day.

Perhaps there’s a reciprocal relationship among all these processes. As we worship God with our adoration and appreciation, praise and prayer, might those other aspects of worship highlighted by Bishop Temple–submission, faith, a renewed mind, love-in-action, and selflessness–be the result?

Might there be an upward spiral effect because, the more a person worships, the more she’ll be transformed? And the more she’s transformed, the purer and more passionate her worship will become?

The influence of such a person—even against political chaos and collapse—knows no bounds, as God magnifies the impact.

One thing only is necessary from each of us: worship—with all its many facets.

God will do the rest.

(Art & photo credits:  www.wikipedia.org; http://www.twitter.comhttp://www.piqsels.comhttp://www.pixfuel.com.)

Reblogged from May 2, 2016.

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We’re now six weeks and five days into spring, and evidence of the season abounds:

  • Greenery flourishes from ground cover to tree tops
  • Lilac, lily of the valley, and hyacinth scent the air
  • Birds perform arias of warbles and trills
  • Butterflies bob from flower to leaf
  • Warm breezes dance through the trees

Most of us revel in these signs of spring.  We find our senses highly engaged, taking in each stage of the transformation. Perhaps that explains why many people experience more joy this time of year. 

I wonder:  what if we engaged our five senses in worship and quiet time with God?  Might some of that springtime joy well up in our spirits—all year long?

Christian psychologist, author, and teacher David Benner would have us understand:

The senses are a doorway to the sacred.

The question becomes:  how might these organs help us connect with God more profoundly?

Here are a few sacred sensory activities to get us started.

Sight

Gaze upon the beauty of the Lord while meditating on his attributes, his works, and wonders (Psalm 27:4).  Record the resulting thoughts on a journal page and increase the impact of reflection.

Revel in the glories of nature and write a page of praise, acclaiming God for his creative genius and impeccable workmanship.

Sound

 Play or listen to worshipful music.

Where words fail, music speaks.

Hans Christian Anderson

Or, listen in silence.

Silence is not an absence of sound

but rather a shifting of attention

toward sounds that speak to the soul.

Thomas Moore

Again, keep a journal and pen at hand to write the thoughts and impressions God speaks into your heart as you listen.

Smell

Begin quiet time by lighting a scented candle.  Perhaps reserve a favorite fragrance for this sacred time of day.  As the aroma fills the air, remember that God is with you, surrounding you with his Presence.

Taste

For many of us a mug of coffee or tea sits alongside our Bibles and journals.  What if we recited Psalm 34:8 as we take that first sip?

Praise God for his goodness; thank him for his blessings. Record one or two of his gifts in a gratitude journal. 

The more we focus on him and his wonderful works, the better we can taste his goodness.  So delight in the sweetness of his unfailing love.  Savor the hearty flavor of his strength.  Satisfy the hunger of your heart with the joy and peace of his presence.*

Touch

Years ago in a class on prayer we participants were instructed to put our hands in our laps, palms up.  After a few silent moments I suddenly felt a tingling sensation.  Was the Spirit of God holding my hands as we prepared to pray?

The professor explained that the pressure on the backs of our hands was causing the phenomenon.  But wasn’t it wonderful to imagine God gracing each of us with his personal touch?  Oh yes!

That evening began a life-long habit of turning my palms upward to pray, to avail myself more fully to the nearness of God.  It’s a divine way to augment worship.

Harold Best believes:

“Of all people, Christians should have the best noses,

the best eyes and ears,

the most open joy, the widest sense of delight.”

As we engage our senses in worship, we will find ourselves ushered through the doorway to the sacred and into the presence of our magnificent and beautiful God.

Do you incorporate any sacred sensory activities into your quiet times with God? Please tell us about it in the comment section below!

*Sarah Young, Jesus Always, Thomas Nelson, 2004, p. 333.

Photo credits: http://www.pxhere.com; ww.flickr.com; http://www.decaturdaily.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.hippopx.com; http://www.pixnio.com; http://www.flickr.com.

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O God, numerous concerns vie for my attention: the state of our country, family needs, friends going through difficult circumstances, my own personal struggles.

Redirect my focus, Father, from what I’m yearning for to what you’ve already given, including:

  • your Spirit of wisdom and revelation
  • your enlightenment to experience hope
  • the riches of your glorious inheritance
  • your incomparably great power*

Each of these gifts is a priceless treasure and more than worthy of meditation and praise.  And so . . .

 

 

. . . I praise you for your spirit of wisdom to guide my thoughts, to equip me for perceiving reality accurately and applying truth correctly.

Help me to trust your all-wise ways and not play the fool, ignoring the treasure of your wisdom that’s always just a prayer away.

 

 

I praise you that year by year, you reveal more and more of yourself to me so our relationship can become increasingly intimate. Never will I tire of learning about you and experiencing you more fully.

 

 

I praise you for your gift of enlightenment to experience hope—complete and calm assurance that you will be victorious in the end, and we’ll live with you forever in the paradise of heaven.

That enlightenment also includes perspective for today. As I focus my thoughts on all you’ve done in the past, my confidence and expectation is affirmed for what you will do in the future.

 

 

I praise you for the riches of your glorious inheritance that we enjoy as your children: your mercy and grace, love and goodness, power and strength–all these and more provided to those who choose to do life with you.

And then there’s the staggering truth we are your inheritance. You look upon your children—even me—not as a liability but as part of your glorious wealth.

 

 

I praise you, O God, that with your incomparably great power, you can take every negative and turn it into a positive. In addition, your dynamic, eternal energy is within me and always available.

No circumstance intimidates you—not the problems of our country, the needs of our family, the difficulties faced by friends, or my own personal struggles. The tougher my day, the stronger your power will flow through me—as long as I stay close by your side.

 

 

I pray for the resolve, holy Father, to avail myself of all this you’ve already given, and may I do so with godly wisdom and constant diligence.

In the name of your Son Jesus who makes such wealth accessible, amen.

 

 

*from Ephesians 1:17-19a.

 

Photo credits:  http://www.piqsels.com (2); http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.piqsels.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.piqsels.com.

 

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