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Archive for the ‘Worship’ Category

Who better to expound on the wonder of God’s presence with us than the eloquent Charles Spurgeon:

“Immanuel, God with us.”

Satan trembles at the sound of it . . .

Let him come to you suddenly,

and do you but whisper that word, “God with us,”

back he falls, confounded and confused . . .

“God with us” is the laborer’s strength.

How could he preach the gospel,

how could he bend his knees in prayer,

how could the missionary go into foreign lands,

how could the martyr stand at the stake,

how could the confessor own his Master,

how could men labor if that one word were taken away?

“God with us” is eternity’s sonnet,

heaven’s hallelujah,

the shout of the glorified,

the song of the redeemed,

the chorus of the angels,

the everlasting oratorio of the great orchestra of the sky.

-Charles Spurgeon

The Treasury of the Old Testament, III:430

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Oh, for words to praise you rightly, Heaven Father, for the glory of “God with us!” Thank You, Lord Jesus, for coming to earth to be our Immanuel, for gracing us with your ceaseless presence.

We stand in awe of what Immanuel means. In addition to the strength Spurgeon mentions here, you provide comfort, encouragement, peace, joy, and more.

May we never take for granted this precious reality!

Photo credit: http://www.dailyverses.net

 

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For the last two posts I’ve shared journal-contemplations from the first two stanzas of “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing.” As with most hymns and praise songs, it’s easy to sing through the lyrics and miss their full significance.

But when we put pen to paper and delve into word meanings, explore implications of the lyrics, and ponder the impressions God brings to our spirits, wonderful blessings emerge: increased understanding of God and his Word, renewal of the mind, and augmented intimacy with God.

Contemplations become worship.

With those thoughts in mind, let’s savor the third stanza:

Hail, the heav’n-born Prince of Peace!

I praise You, Lord Jesus, the only One who can mediate reconciliation between the sin-prone people we are and the righteous God of heaven. Without You, we’d have no hope of eternal life.

I praise You also for the peace of mind you provide as we affirm Your attributes. By Your omnipotent strength you will uphold, and by Your omniscient wisdom You will guide, until our days on earth are complete. We are safe in Your hands (1).

Hail, the Sun of Righteousness! Light and Life to all He brings

I praise You, Lord Jesus, that Your radiant presence brings comfort, joy, and prosperity of soul.

Your Light of truth obliterates the lies of our enemy and brings us closer to You.

From Your Light shine beams of blessing such as these:

  • The variety of wholesome pleasures in this world, benefiting us in mind, body, and spirit
  • The love of family and friends, increasing our joy
  • The ability to read and learn, providing knowledge and wisdom
  • The delight of hands, allowing us to pursue a myriad of satisfying activities (2)

Risen with healing in His wings

I praise You, Lord God, for raising Jesus from the dead. Because He’s alive, we who believe in Him can be confident of eternal life also.  

One day Your Son will come on swift wings, ready to bestow perfect healing upon all who’ve come to Him. Our healing from the sickness of sin that causes so much woe will finally be complete. There will be no more pain and suffering, no more harm and brokenness, no more sorrow or death!

But even now, Lord Jesus, just as beams from the sun bring health to every living thing, You bring health to our spirits—a deep-down contentment only You can provide (3).

Mild he lays his glory by, born that man no more may die

I praise You, Lord Jesus, for laying aside Your glory as the Son of God. You left Your celestial throne, the unceasing adoration of angels, and all the splendors of paradise to be born a helpless baby.

During your earthly life, few praised You as You deserved; many found fault with Your glorious perfections.

Nevertheless, You see worth in every human being; you desire that everyone accept God’s gift of eternal life, that “man no more may die.”

I praise You for saving us from the death-sentence of our sin (4).

    

Born to raise the sons of earth, born to give them second birth.

I praise You, Lord Jesus, for the transformed life You offer, raising each believer out of his plight of eternal death and into the pleasure of eternal life with You–pleasures that begin the moment we say yes to You.

Those gifts include:

  • Security, because our final destiny is secure, and in the meantime You’re always with us, working toward our best good
  • Provision of guidance, strength, help and more
  • Rest for our souls, as Your Spirit of counsel and power takes up residence in our spirits
  • Gladness, as we celebrate Your work around us and in us

One day, Lord God, You will raise all Your children into the magnificence of Your heaven! With joyful expectation we anticipate the wonders You’ve planned for us.

Thank You for making possible this second birth into Your family. All the amazing blessings highlighted in this carol come to us when we choose adoption into Your family (5).

I praise You, Lord Jesus, for providing reconciliation with God, ultimate victory over death, over-arching peace and joy, healing for the wounds of our spirits, and more.

Glory to You, my magnificent, sovereign King!

Notes:

  1. Acts 4:12; 2 Timothy 4:18
  2. Psalm 23:4; John 15:11; Philippians 4:11-13; Hebrews 4:12
  3. John 6:40; Revelation 21:4; Psalm 23:1-3
  4. Philippians 2:6-7; Revelation 5:11-12; 2 Peter 3:8; Romans 6:23
  5. John 11:26; Matthew 28:20; Romans 8:28; Isaiah 11:2; 1 Corinthians 6:19; Psalm 92:4; John 14:3; 2 Corinthians 4:14; John 14:3

Photo credits: Nancy Ruegg; http://www.openclipart.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.open.life.church/resources; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.heartlight.org.

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Last week I shared with you journal-contemplations from the first verse of “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing.” As with most hymns and praise songs, it’s easy to sing through the lyrics of this carol and miss their full significance.  

By putting pen to paper, we slow our thinking and wonderful blessings begin to emerge—like increased understanding of God and his Word, renewal of the mind, and augmented intimacy with God.

Contemplations can become worship.

With that in mind, let’s savor the second verse:

“Christ by highest heaven adored”

How glorious the music in heaven must be! Rich, clear voices, every note perfectly pitched. Intricate harmonies and faultless instrumentation.

All these sublime elements come together to worship You, Lord Christ–the Anointed One–who left the magnificence of heaven to be the Savior of humankind.

Thank you, Father, for giving us a glimpse (in the book of Revelation) of the heavenly song that celebrates King Jesus. I can’t help but hear Handel’s majestic melody from Messiah for the lyrics:

I praise You, Lord Jesus, for Your splendor!

“Christ, the everlasting Lord!”

You, O Christ, existed throughout the infinite past and will prevail into the infinite future.

Though Son of God, You are also the Eternal Father, forever with us and LORD of all. Nothing is outside Your control (1).

Power often corrupts in the human realm. But You are perfect in all attributes and motivated by matchless love.

I praise You, O Christ, for the supreme grace of Your Lordship!

“Late in time behold Him come”

To those who waited for Your arrival, You must have seemed late! Centuries had passed since the last prophecy of Your coming.

“But when the time was right,” You, O God, sent Your Son to redeem us (2).

In retrospect we can see why You chose the time of Roman rule. They had established stability in their far-reaching empire, built thousands of miles of roads, and established a common language.

Such factors meant early Christians could spread the good news about You more easily than ever before (3).

I praise You, O God, for Your masterful orchestration

that’s always in operation for the benefit of Your children!

“Offspring of the Virgin’s womb”

You are the One and Only begotten Son of the God the Father, the only Man of heavenly origin who ever lived on earth.

You committed no sin. Without that absolute perfection in You, there would be no salvation for us. God made You, who never sinned, to be sin so we could be made right with Him (4).

I praise You, Righteous Savior, for Your perfection!

“Veiled in flesh the Godhead see”

You embodied all the magnificent attributes of God during Your time on earth, yet You were also human.

You dealt with exhaustion, frustration, temptations, and discomforts, just as we do. The fullness of Your glory was veiled behind the ordinariness of Your humanity (5).

How difficult that must have been to know Your full capabilities yet continually hold Yourself in check.

I praise You, Lord Jesus, for your fierce love

that compelled You to complete such an arduous mission.

“Hail th’incarnate Deity”

No one has ever lived a sinless life except You.

No one espoused wisdom as You did or performed miracles like You.

You are the radiance of God’s glory!

I praise your for your divine holiness.

“Pleased as man with men to dwell”

You chose to come to earth and dwell among us, in spite of our self-centeredness, pride, weakness, and brokenness.

Such an incredible reality!

I praise You, O Lord, for your mercy, for wanting to be with us.

“Jesus, our Emmanuel.”

You are Emmanuel—God with us (7). Once we invite You into our lives we’re never left to our own feeble devices; we’re never without Your attentive care.

In Your presence we experience joy, refreshment, help, and pleasure (8). You enhance every moment of life with Your radiant attributes!

I praise You, O Christ, for choosing to veil Yourself in flesh that we might behold You.

I praise You for dwelling with us that might enjoy You!

Notes:

  1. Isaiah 9:6; Matthew 28:20; Philippians 2:9-11
  2. Galatians 4:4-5 CEV
  3. See “The Appropriate Time” for further details
  4. John 3:16; 1 Peter 2:22; 2 Corinthians 5:21
  5. Daniel Ruben, http://www.fbccarson.org/harktheheraldangelssing
  6. John 10:17 and 1:14
  7. Matthew 1:23
  8. Isaiah 9:3; Acts 2:28 and 3:19; Psalm 42:5; Psalm 16:11

Art & photo credits: http://www.rawpixels.com; http://www.openclipart.com; http://www.pexels.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.worldhistory.org; http://www.canva.com; http://www.freebibleimages.org (2); http://www.wallpaper4god.com; http://www.hippopx.com.

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Some time ago, wise-and-insightful blogger Michele Morin (over at Living Our Days) shared that she was journaling through some of the old hymns. Isn’t that a brilliant idea?

I imagined her digging into the meaning of some of the rich language and theology, personalizing the truths, and/or using them as the basis for prayer.

Most often we sing through the lyrics so quickly we miss their full significance. But if we intentionally slow our thinking by putting pen or pencil to paper, we make room for wonderful blessings to emerge—blessings like increased understanding of God and his Word, renewal of the mind, and augmented intimacy with God.

Our contemplations can become worship.

So far I’ve journaled through seven hymns. For Advent I chose to contemplate a Christmas carol: Charles Wesley’s “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing,” which offers both rich language and theology. (The story behind the song is also interesting. You can read it here: “Hark, the Herald Angels Sing.”)

Over the next three weeks we’ll savor the three best-known verses of this carol. No doubt you’re familiar with the first:  

My journaled prayer included the following.

“Hark!” the hymn writer begins, inviting me to listen with close attention. His lyrics take me back in time to that night when angels declared life-transforming news for those who embrace it:

A new King has been born—a king like no other (1)!

That’s YOU, Lord Jesus. You are the Prince of Peace, the One who offers inner tranquility to all who desire it (2), and universal, all-encompassing peace when the new heaven and the new earth are established (3).

I praise You, O Christ, for Your comforting peace

that steadies me and gives me hope.

You’re the One who bestows mercy—tender-hearted forgiveness—when I confess the wrongs I’ve committed. You’re the One who put ultimate mercy into action by “being obedient to God and dying a criminal’s death on a cross” (4).

I praise You, O Christ, for your unceasing mercy.

You have not punished me

the way I deserve, and You never will.

You’re the One who reconciled me to God (5). First, You chose to do the unthinkable, to die in my place and pay the penalty for every sin I commit.

Then You restored my broken relationship with God, as I put my trust in You and accepted Your free gift of eternal life. Because of You, I have right standing with God and access into His presence at any time.

I praise You, O Christ, for your unimaginable sacrifice,

making the impossible possible.

For all these blessings (and so much more) I rise up with Jesus-followers from around the world to sing joyful praise to You (6)!

Our voices join those of the angels to give you glory (7)–celebrating Your attributes, rejoicing in Your excellent works, and taking pleasure in the privilege of being sons and daughters of Almighty God.

I praise You, O Christ, for leaving the wonders of heaven

to be born in the humble village of Bethlehem

and live among ignoble humanity—

all for our benefit.

I praise You, O Christ, for the incredible FREE gift

of eternal ecstasy in paradise with You.

And I praise You for being my compassionate Christ,

my glorious Emancipator, and my powerful King!

Notes:

  1. Revelation 1:5-6
  2. Romans 5:1
  3. 2 Peter 3:13
  4. Philippians 2:8 TLB
  5. 2 Corinthians 5:18-19
  6. Psalm 67:4
  7. Psalm 148:11-13

Photo credits: http://www.pxhere.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.openclipart.com and http://www.canva.com; http://www.negativespace.com (3); http://www.publicdomainpictures.net.

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Long ago in Sunday School, our teachers taught us proper respect for God.  The rules of reverence included:

  • Be quiet and solemn in worship
  • Bow your head, close your eyes, and fold your hands to pray
  • Always treat God’s house with utmost respect

The first rule proved the most difficult to keep. I failed many a Sunday. My legs wanted to swing, my hands wished for crayons and paper, my eyes longed for a book. Would the sermon ever end?!

Years later I came across the Westminster Shorter Catechism, a collection of 107 questions and answers explaining the Christian faith. The list began with, “What is the chief end of man?” The answer shocked me.

The first part made perfect sense. Paul made it clear: “Whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31).  But the second part caught me off guard.

Enjoy God?

His blessings and benefits certainly brought me joy. But God himself? How could I enjoy Someone who’s invisible?

Over time I’ve discovered that, although God deserves the utmost reverence and respect, we need not always be solemn. We can laugh and sing for joy in his presence (Psalm 68:3 MSG).

In fact, enthusiastic praise of God, especially in the company of others, is an invigorating way to enjoy him–reveling in who he is—our God of goodness, grace, and love.

We can also celebrate what he’s done—supplying our needs, guiding the way, and surprising us with gifts we didn’t even ask for.

While we’re worshiping, we can lift our hands toward God (Psalm 63:4), augmenting our connection to him. Even hands placed palms up on the lap can add to our enjoyment.

Steve and I learned this posture from one of his seminary professors. After a teaching session on prayer, Dr. Stanger instructed us to place our hands in our laps, palms up.

We sat in silence for a few moments, and suddenly I felt a tingling in my hands! Was the Spirit of God actually holding my hands as we prepared to pray?!

Dr. Stanger explained: the pressure on the backs of our hands caused the phenomenon.   But wasn’t it wonderful to imagine God gracing each of us with his personal touch in this way?

Yes, supremely delightful!

We can also take the celebration outside and enjoy God as Creator and King of the universe. For example, look to the sky and contemplate the galaxies of stars. Smile at him in wonder because of their incomprehensible magnitude and indescribable beauty. Consider too, they’re all under his control.

Another way to enjoy God is to delight in his scripture. We can proclaim appreciation to him for the strength, comfort, and peace his Word provides, as well as those passages that bring joy to our hearts (Psalm 119:111).

Those of us who like to write find great pleasure in composing journal entries, poetry, personal psalms, and more, addressed to God, as a way of expressing our delight in him.

Sarah Young, author of Jesus Calling, has inspired some of us to follow her example and go a step further: record thoughts or impressions we receive from God as we wait and listen in his presence (Psalm 25:5; 85:8).

In these ways and more God has made it possible for us to continually enjoy him.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Dare I say it?  Is it too irreverent? You are FUN, God! I love spending time with you, rejoicing in you, celebrating your works, reveling in your presence, taking delight in our mutual communication.

What a glorious privilege you’ve granted us, Father, to nestle close to you and experience fullness of joy forevermore!

(Psalm 100:1-2; John 10:27; Psalm 65:2; Isaiah 40:11; Psalm 16:11)

(Revised and reblogged from March 15, 2015, while I recover from Covid. My husband tested positive last Wednesday; I succumbed on Saturday. Symptoms have been uncomfortable but tolerable for both of us; we’re on the mend! ‘Will try to write a fresh post for next week.)

Photo credits: http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.canva.com; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.wikimediacommons.org; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.canva.com.

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In 2 Peter 1:17 the apostle calls God, “the Majestic Glory.” Isn’t that an inspired name for God?

This week I chose to use each letter as a portal into aspects of his majestic glory—other names that reveal his Personhood. With each one, my awe for Almighty God expanded.

See if your spirit responds similarly, as you consider God as the:

Maker of All Things (Nehemiah 9:6)

He is responsible for every star in the heavens (200 billion trillion of them, thereabouts), every tree on our planet (all 3 trillion, give or take) and every fish in the seas (among 34,000 or so species)!

A rchitect of Heaven (Hebrews 11:10)

Here on Earth we marvel at God’s handiwork in the towering mountain peaks, delicate butterflies, and far-reaching rainbows. Try to imagine the fresh beauty, new wonders, and absolute perfection he’s prepared for us in heaven!

Jealous (Exodus 34:14)

God’s jealousy is simply passionate eagerness to protect what belongs to him, what is precious to him—you and me. He doesn’t want us following after such false gods as greed, self-gratification, or popularity that will never satisfy. Only he can.

Everlasting God (Genesis 21:33)

In contrast to this ever-decaying world, our God’s perfections never change and his mercies will never end. He is always and eternally available to us.[1]

Song (Psalm 118:14 ESV)

Think of song as a synonym for joy. He is the Author and Giver of joy, even in difficult times. In fact, “He uses troubles to show where true joys are to be found—in him.”[2]

True God (John 17:3)

He’s the one and only Creator and Sustainer of the universe. Yet, as holy, powerful, and awe-inspiring as he is, God invites us to know him—to pull up a chair to his table and talk with him.[3]

I AM (Exodus 3:14)

With this name that encompasses all his glorious complexities, God makes clear: “I AM the God of absolute power and sublime perfection, abiding faithfulness and assured reliability, unfailing love and generous benevolence.” Of course, these descriptors just scratch the surface of his infinite glory!

Comforter (Isaiah 51:12)

We can take comfort in the knoweldge that, even in the dark pit of emotional pain., we are not without hope. God always comes alongside to help us endure until it’s time to bring us out of those depths. And then, when we stand at last on the solid ground of restoration, we experience the exhilaration of greater faith and the enrichment of wisdom-from-experience.

Gardener (John 15:1)

Jesus often used figurative language in his teaching. One time he compared himself to a grapevine and called his Father the Gardener/Vinedresser.

Of course, our God knows intimately what we–the branches–need.  He supplies streams of living water to continually nourish and refresh, and he provides optimum conditions for growth, in order to produce the best yield of the fruit of the Spirit within us.

Light  (Psalm 27:1)

His Light reveals the way on the dark path ahead, lifts the shadows of hurt and despair, and guides us through “the grayness of doubt and uncertainty.”[4]

Only Wise God (Jude 1:25)

Yes, there is darkness and confusion in our world. Wickedness seems to be winning in the battle between good and evil. BUT! Our all-wise God knows what he’s doing—in our personal lives and in the world at large.

When the time is right he’ll dispel the darkness with his dazzling light and bring order out of confusion. One day he’ll rid the world of evil once and for all.

Revealer of Truth (John 16:13)

Our God is the “possessor and giver of all truth. Truth is not men’s discovery; it is God’s gift. . . At the back of all truth there is God.”[5]

And the more we avail ourselves of his truth in scripture, the more we treasure it.

Your Very Great Reward  (Genesis 15:1)

How rich we are because God is in us and with us, wielding his glorious attributes for our best good. How poor we are without him.[6]

Look upon God in all his MAJESTIC GLORY. This is your Heavenly Father who loves you with an everlasting love!

Breathe in the wonder.


[1] Lamentations 3:22; Isaiah 41:10

[2] Timothy Keller with Kathy Keller, Songs of Jesus, 200.

[3] 1 Corinthians 8:16; Colossians 1:17; Jeremiah 33:3

[4] Iris Hesselden, quoted in Grandma’s Inspirational Recipes, 40.

[5] William Barclay, The Daily Study Bible, The Gospel of John, Volume 2, 229.

[6] MacLaren’s Expositions

Photo credits: http://www.rawpixel.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.flicker.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.canva.com; http://www.pixnio.com.

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You probably know it, have even memorized it:

Such a statement begs the question: how does joy—of all things–translate into strength? Wouldn’t it be faith in the Lord that makes us strong? Turns out joy is an important facet of faith.

That phrase “of the Lord” holds the key. When we delight in the Author of joy–who he is and what he does–that’s when our spirits begin to grow strong.

To foster that kind of joy and delight:

Express Gratitude

Tonia Peckover wrote, “The feeling of joy begins in the action of thanksgiving” [1].

Research has proven that keeping a gratitude journal works well to develop our appreciation muscles [2]. Just a few lines per day can get joy percolating in our spirits.

Another strategy: turn mindless tasks like folding laundry, loading the dishwasher, etc. into moments of thanksgiving. Go through the alphabet, perhaps, and thank God for one blessing for each letter.

You might begin with AFFECTION among family and friends, BEDTIME and that first BLISSFUL moment on the pillow after a challenging day, COFFEE—the most delectable flavor to start the morning.

For an extra challenge, you might focus on who God is. He’s ACTIVE in our lives, BENEVOLENT to us, COMPASSIONATE, and DELIGHTFUL—you get the idea. (For a sample of such an alphabet, see “God’s Goodness from A to Z,” a post from 2018.)

Meditate on God’s Word

Here’s another joy-inducing, writing-exercise:

In a journal or on a piece of paper, write your reason(s) for being distressed. Then conduct a scripture search (Online resources abound!) for specific promises and encouraging passages that address your concern.  

Praise God for each one as you copy it on the page. Express expectancy for the day when each promise is fulfilled, and feel radiant joy rise in your spirit as you do.

Martin Luther advised:

It stands to reason that something much smaller, our hearts, will also change when we pick up our pens.

That’s happened for me; the same will hold true for you.

Follow God’s Ways

Countless people through the ages have thought that following their own way—striving for success, accumulating wealth, and participating in self-pleasing pursuits—would bring them joy. But such quests never deliver, because that’s not where joy is found.

Joy is found in obedience to God’s ways [3]. He made us; he knows what’s best for us. Of course, we know that. So why do many of us balk at what will bring maximum blessing?!

Anything God commands of us is so that our joy may be full.

Beth Moore [4]

Note that glorious word, full–as in brimming and bursting at the seams.

And what does fullness of joy include? Beauty and bounty.

Beautiful encounters. Beautiful endeavors. Beautiful moments.

Bountiful blessing. Bountiful fruit. Bountiful satisfaction [5].

When we yield in obedience to God’s voice,

he yields a harvest greater than we can imagine.

Denise J. Hughes [6]

And so, joy becomes strength when we delight in who God is and what God does.

Joy becomes strength as we blissfully trust in the truth of his Word.

And joy becomes strength when we gladly follow his instructions.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Lord God, I do want to experience your joy in my life, to delight in you so my spirit might grow stronger. Help me to make choices throughout each day that usher me into your fullness of joy!

(Psalm 112:1; 16:11)


[1] Quoted by Ann Voskamp, 1000 Gifts, 176.

[2] https://cct.biola.edu/thanks-science-gratitude/

[3] John 15:9-11

[4] Values for Life, 169

[5] Ephesians 3:20; 2 Corinthians 9:8 

[6] Deeper Waters, 149

Art & photo credits: http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.pxhere.com (2); http://www.canva.com (3).

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In April of this year I shared an idea borrowed from blogger Michele Morin, about journaling through hymns and praise songs. Such an exercise allows us to meditate on the lyrics, discovering more meaning than when we quickly sing through the words.

In that post I shared from my thoughts on “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing.” (Here’s a link to that post, Opening Up New Spaces.)

Today, let’s look more closely at another hymn rich with implications, “Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise.”

If you don’t know this hymn, you can listen to a contemporary version here,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S97XYCkJhY, then soak with me in the first verse:

“Immortal, invisible, God only wise”

I praise You, O God, for your immortality. There is much comfort in the fact that you–in all your sovereignty, power, and wisdom–have always existed and always will.

I praise You for your invisibility, which allows you to reside within the spirits of all your children. We marvel at the wonder of such a phenomenon–such a privilege–to enjoy intimacy with you, the King of the universe!

I praise you for your incomparable wisdom. Nothing is ever a mystery to you. You’re never puzzled, confused, or uncertain.[1] You always know the best course of action that will best serve everyone involved—even those who are part of the ripple effect, perhaps years later.

How amazing that you make your wisdom available to us–including an ordinary person like me.[2]

“In light inaccessible hid from our eyes”

You are light.  Your radiance is like sunlight, and rays flash from your hands! No one can physically look upon such brilliance.

But your light also symbolizes the purity of your character. Just as sunlight brightens our world, your multi-beamed goodness brightens my soul with grace, strength, blessings, and more.

You also illuminate truth in my life, through the light of your Word. And by the power of your Spirit I can walk daily in the guiding, cheering light of your presence.[3] 

“Most blessed, most glorious, the Ancient of Days”

I praise You that you are most blessed. That is, you are fully satisfied within yourself. (Of course this is true–you’re perfect!)

You’re also most blessed because of your holiness–transcendent and “totally other” from anything else in the universe.

In addition, you’re “most glorious.” Your breath-taking attributes astound us, including your:

  • omnipotence, omniscience, and omnipresence
  • infinity, changelessness, and self-sufficiency
  • faithfulness, goodness, and justice
  • mercy, grace, and love
  • holiness, righteousness, and immanence

I praise you for demonstrating all these traits with acts of power. You perform wonders that cannot be fathomed, and miracles that cannot be counted![4]

Our family has witnessed numerous wonders and miracles. “We are filled with the good things of your house” (Psalm 65:46), many of which are recorded in my God -Is-Faithful journal.

I also praise you for being our Ancient of Days—a name that speaks of your regality, endurance, and sound judgment.  You have reigned in supremacy through eons past and will continue to reign into eternity yet to come.

Again, what sweet comfort and joyful wonder to contemplate that you, such an incredible God, are with me and within me, wielding your attributes for my benefit.

“Almighty, victorious—Thy great name we praise.”

King David wrote, “How majestic is your name in all the earth” (Psalm 8:1)! Perhaps he had in mind the multiplicity of your names, each one highlighting different facets of your character. You are:

  • Elohim, God of supreme power and might
  • El Roi, the God Who Sees, who watches over all
  • Jehovah Jireh, our God who provides
  • Jehovah Rapha, our God who heals
  • Yaweh Shalom, our God of peace

And that’s just a few out of many. I thank you that as each one reveals more truth about you, we grow to know you better. I also praise you for the hope and encouragement we find in your glorious names.

You, O God, are most worthy of praise because of your infinite excellencies. I praise you for your greatness–beyond human comprehension!


[1] Lloyd Stilley, https://www.lifeway.com/en/articles/sermon-wisdom-god-romans-16-1-corinthians-1

[2] James 1:5; Psalm 19:7 CEV

[3] 1 John 1:5; Habakkuk 3:4; 1 John 3:3; Psalm 12:6; 119:105; Psalm 89:15; John 8:12

[4] Psalm 150:2; Job 5:9

Photo credits: Nancy Ruegg; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.canva.com; http://www.pixnio.com; http://www.heartlight.org.

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Approximately 250 times in scripture we’re told to praise the Lord[ 1].

Some would see all these calls to praise as the directives of an ego-maniacal god, but that’s hardly the case. Upon further investigation of scripture we find that praise of God is actually good for us.

Isn’t that just like our Heavenly Father? We seek to bless him by offering our praises, and he turns right around and blesses us when we do.

What are those blessings of praise? I’m so glad you asked. Here are just seven as a starter-list.  You may find a surprise or two.

Praising God alleviates anxieties.  

As we remind ourselves Who’s in charge and how he provides for those in his care, fears are calmed.  (Psalm 146 offers an example).

Praising God enhances prayer.

Instead of focusing on the problem which presses us downward, praise turns our attention to what God can do and lifts our spirit upward. (See Psalm 103.)

Praising God kicks Satan to the curb.

James 4:7 reminds us, “Resist the devil, and he will flee from you.” What better way to resist him than to focus on God’s power, promises, and past provisions?

Praise brings the consciousness of the presence of God,

and the liars from the pit cannot effectively market their wares

in the atmosphere of praise.

—Jack Taylor[2]

Praising God magnifies blessings.

When we look through a magnifying glass at an object, we often experience greater appreciation of that object. Hold a magnifying glass of praise to God for the day’s blessings and experience greater appreciation of Him and his benefits (Psalm 77:11-14).

Praising God offers comfort.

Are you disappointed? Praise God that he brings good out of every situation (Romans 8:28). Are you hurting? Celebrate God’s abundant goodness in spite of circumstances (Psalm 145:7). Are you fearful? Rejoice in God, a strong refuge in times of trouble; he is ready and willing to help (Psalm 46:1).

Praising God provides pleasure.

“Praise the Lord, for the Lord is good” encouraged one of the psalmists. “Sing praise to his name, for that is pleasant” (Psalm 135:3). Numerous times in scripture we’re urged to sing and shout for joy because of who God is and what he does. Why?

Praising God replenishes faith.

Meditate on Psalm 145 and note all the attributes of God highlighted, including: his greatness, (v. 3), the mighty acts he performs (v. 4), the splendor of his majesty (v. 5), his goodness and righteousness (v. 7).   

The more you praise God, the more you become God-conscious

and absorbed in His greatness, wisdom, faithfulness, and love.

Praise reminds you of all that God is able to do

and of great things He has already done.

Wesley L. Duewel

Add these to the list:

  • Praising God in the company of others encourages them (Colossians 3:16).
  • Praising God fine-tunes our perspective as our focus shifts from self to him (Psalm 121).
  • Praising God grows our hope, humbles our spirits, and ushers in peace (Psalm 33:18-22, Psalm 8, Psalm 62:1-2).

Surely there are still more blessings of praise to be discovered. No wonder G. K. Chesterton wrote:

  • * * * * * * * * * *

Thank you, Father, for these many blessings you lavishly supply as we learn to enjoy you through praise. May we grow each day in our capacity to celebrate you at every turn.

Did any of these blessings of praise surprise you? Tell us about it in the comment section below!


Notes:

[1] https://faithalone.org/grace-in-focus-articles/praise-the-lord/

[2] quoted in Satisfy the Thirsty Soul by Linda Dillow, 191.

Photo credits: http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.pxhere.com;www.maxpixel.net; http://www.flickr.com.

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“The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want” (Psalm 23:1 KJV).

Many of us memorized those words as children. And some of us may have thought, “Wow! That means God will give me whatever I want!”

So we prayed for new bicycles, the latest gadgets, and swimming pools in our backyards—absolutely certain that if God gave us these hearts’ desires, we’d be truly satisfied.

Some of our prayers were answered affirmatively. A new bicycle with sparkling spokes actually materialized by the Christmas tree. Or Aunt Kate heard the pleas for Mattell’s Magical Music Thing, and sent it as a birthday gift.

But as the years went by, the wise and introspective among us realized:

1. When one desire is fulfilled, another quickly takes its place.

Years ago I heard that a famous actress had accumulated seven houses, each one a different style from the others. Why? Because moving from one to another eased her boredom. (I wonder how long it took to become discontented with House #4, or #5, or #6, before she hired an architect to start the next?)

2. God isn’t in the business of making wishes come true.

Psalm 23:1 doesn’t mean: “I’m one of God’s flock! I’m gonna live on Easy Street!”

If he did grant every whim, we’d soon become self-centered and spoiled.

Perhaps a clarifying interpretation of the opening scripture would be: “God is my loving Care-Giver. All that I enjoy in my relationship with him far outweighs anything this world has to offer. I really don’t need another single thing.”

Ah, to be as soul-satisfied as King David, the author of this psalm!  How can we become that contented?

One place to begin is with gratitude and praise.

Think of all we enjoy as a result of our relationship with God.  Peace, joy, and provision quickly come to mind.

Here are a few more:

  • Companionship with a perfect Friend—every moment of every day–into eternity.  He is always listening, always watchful, always diligent.
  • Hope. No situation is beyond the control of our Almighty God.
  • Settledness, because he is in control, and “makes good things even out of hard times” (Erica Hale).
  • Truth. We don’t have to muddle through life like a do-it-yourselfer with no instruction manual. “The unfolding of [God’s] words gives light; it gives understanding to the simple” (Psalm 119:130).

The bottom-line is this: No possession or position, no place or person on earth can fill our hearts with contentment.

3. True satisfaction flourishes when we affirm that in God we have all we need.

Remember Jesus’ invitation in Matthew 11:28?

Are you weary of the dissatisfaction that results from striving for the next desire?  Are you burdened by unfulfilled wishes and dreams?

Come to Jesus.  Count the scores of blessings he’s already provided in the past, is currently providing this very moment, and has already prepared in the glory of heaven yet to come.

Cultivate true satisfaction in your heart with gratitude and praise!

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

What helps you cultivate true satisfaction?  Please share in the Comments section below!

Art & photo credits: http://www.canva.com; http://www.flickr.com; http://www.rawpixel.com; http://www.wikimedia.org.

(Revised and reblogged from 7-10-14 while we enjoy house guests.)

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