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Posts Tagged ‘Living Aware’

 

Which would you say is the most common human weakness?

A. Living unaware?

B. Greed?

C. Pride?

D. Selfishness?

According to pastor and author, Lou Guntzelman, the answer is A.*

Even twenty years ago when Guntzelman wrote his book, he saw many people living superficially, busily, and distractedly –moving too fast and focusing too much on insignificant matters.

 

 

Maybe those descriptors don’t apply to you. But I have been guilty on all counts.

And those of us who tend to fly through our days are at great risk of missing life.

We don’t see the unique qualities of the people around us.

 

 

We don’t hear the laughter of our children.

 

 

We don’t even think to take in deep gulps of rain-scented air, just for the pleasure of breathing.

 

 

We don’t taste and see God’s goodness in the world.

 

(Blackwater Falls, WV)

 

We don’t sense His presence.

 

 

But!

 

When we learn to engage the mind and especially the spirit in the moment at hand, we discover the splendor of God’s glory tucked into surprising places–right in front of us.

 

 

“The moment one gives close attention to anything,

even a blade of grass,

it becomes a mysterious, awesome,

indescribably magnificent world in itself.”

–Henry Miller

 

The obvious question is: how do we reprogram ourselves to live more aware?

 

Perhaps the first step is to condition our minds through quiet reflection.

 

In a place of solitude, we avail ourselves of his presence and redirect our attention from the day’s cares to God’s truth.

 

 

Sometimes that might include:

  • Studying and contemplating scripture, open to a change of heart or a change of direction.
  • Naming God’s attributes and celebrating how he’s demonstrated those attributes in our lives.
  • Keeping a gratitude journal, to help us tune in to the positive.  (It’s a transformative habit!)
  • Reading books by thought-provoking Christian authors, then mentally processing their tenets, and seeking ways of application to life when appropriate.

 

 

The state of our minds affects our perception of everything.

 

Second, we condition our focus.

 

We determine to:

 

(Backyard beauties at our house,

on display the end of April)

 

  • Appreciate more fully the natural wonders around us—even in the backyard, on the way to work, while running errands.
  • Honor each person we meet with eye contact, smiles, and a kind word.
  • Sift out the immaterial and apply ourselves to the important.
  • Refuse pointless worry and find priceless treasure in scriptural reassurance and God’s inimitable peace.
  • Pursue wholeness—the state of being perfectly well in body, soul (mind, will, and emotions) and spirit.  That happens as we submit more and more to God’s perfect ways (Psalm 119:1-2).

 

 

And what will be the result?

Each day there will be the anticipation of discovery and delight, joyful praise and expectant hope. We’ll find ourselves speaking to God more and more often, and hearing his whispers in our hearts. We’ll experience greater satisfaction in life as we train our focus on him and savor his endless blessings.

 

 

Bottom line: We will live on the threshold of heaven.

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

 

Oh, this is where I want to live, Father—on the precipice of your glory. Though responsibilities must be taken care of, I can still take note and inwardly digest all the beauty, blessings, discoveries, and lessons that you bring to my attention. Help me to live aware!

 

*Lou Guntzelman, So Heart and Mind Can Fill, St. Mary’s Press, 1998.

 

Art & photo credits:  http://www.publicdomainpictures.net; http://www.commons.wikimedia.org; wwwpxhere.com; http://www.pixabay.com (2); http://www.commons.wikimedia.org; http://www.pxhere.com (2); http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.pixnio.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.quotefancy.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.pxhere.com.

 

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“Haste makes waste,” Benjamin Franklin wisely observed. And most of us would agree. When we hurry, we spill things, drop things, forget things, trip over things.

But Ben’s proverb may be true in a way he never intended.

Haste makes waste of the beauty around us, the joy and goodness to be found in the present moment.

 If we’re not careful, we rush right by such priceless splendors as:

  • Tiny leaves courageously reaching for sun in spite of snow

 

tulip-spears-in-snow

 

  • Evergreens encrusted with raindrop jewels

 

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  • The first butterfly of spring (‘Just spotted one like this yesterday!)

 

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  • An impromptu hug from family member or friend

 

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  • A wisp of a bug living between flower bud and leaf

 

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(See it?  On the left side of the bud!)

  • A child’s giddy grin, wreathed in chocolate

 

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But how do we become people who live aware—vigilantly watchful for beauty, goodness, and joy?

Ann Voskamp would say: begin a list of wonders. Many of you know she challenged herself to live aware and record One Thousand Gifts (the title of her book about the quest and its impact on her life). Somehow the act of collecting and writing helps us become more intentional.

Spring is the perfect time to practice living with joyful awareness.

Have you noticed the greening of the landscape, beginning at ground level with the grass, and working skyward through bush and shrub? The largest trees will be the last to unfurl their leaves in a grand display of emerald luxuriance.

 

spring-forest

 

Perhaps even more glorious is the splendor of the magnolia, dogwood, and redbud in full bloom. Their individual beauty can only be surpassed when clustered together.

 

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And of course, the blooming of flowers, the songs of birds and the scampering of squirrels give us much to savor.

But beautiful or joyful as these may be, what’s the value of paying attention to such details?

Heightened awareness of all these gifts (and more) fosters gratitude.   And gratitude positively impacts the way we see the world and experience life.

Of course, appreciation in itself is rather meaningless. How silly to say “thank you” to the air. No, gratitude must be expressed to someone. And all we have, all we enjoy, is due to the loving kindness of a singular Someone—our benevolent Father.

When we express our thankfulness to him, we’re ushered into his presence.  Yes, right into the throne room of Almighty God.

Now you may have been wondering as you skimmed this post, When is she going to get to the part about “How to Be Rich—Today?” (That was the title, in case you missed it!)

Here’s what we can do:

Focus on what we already have, not on what we lack.

 

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“It is only with gratitude that life becomes rich.”

(Dietrich Bonhoeffer)

You see?  We’re already rich.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

Thank you, God, for countless, precious blessings every day—blessings that make me smile or gaze in awe at the wonders you’ve created. May your praise always be on my lips, as I seek to live aware of your bounty around me. And may my gratitude bring joy to your heart also.

 

(Art & Photo Credits:  www.amazon.com; http://www.tulipsinthewoods.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.scalar.usc.edu; http://www.hookedonthebook.com; Nancy Ruegg; ww.pixabay.com; http://www.freebigpictures.com; http://www.pinerest.com (2).

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Henry James, by John Singer Sargent (died 1925...

Henry James, by John Singer Sargent (died 1925). See source website for additional information. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

“A writer should strive to be a person on whom nothing is lost.” – Henry James.

Some of you may recognize that name from literature class. Does Portrait of a Lady or The Turn of the Screw sound familiar?

Henry James became known for well-developed characters and for stories with an undercurrent of commentary on politics, the social classes, feminism, and morality.

With many works to his credit, his advice for writers–to “live aware”–is advice worth taking.

So we writers become observers–of people, situations, and creation.

We try to see more – the swirling rainbow on a bubble; the slight arch of the eyebrow indicating doubt.

We try to hear more – the squirrel’s staccato tapping as he scampers up a tree; the brief pause of uncertainty.

We try to smell more – the promise of harvest in the freshly turned soil of spring; the aroma of love in a Thanksgiving feast.

We try to taste more – the flavor of winter in a snowflake; the delectable sweetness of moments spent with family or old friends.

We try to feel more – the downy softness of silk on a milkweed seed; the comforting warmth of traditions.

As a result, we’re better equipped to convey meaning to our readers—with clarity and specificity, we hope.

And it occurred to me, Christians should also strive to be persons on whom nothing is lost.

We Christians need to live aware, so as not to miss what God reveals.

We must try to see more – in His Word, His people, and creation.

We must try to hear more – of his still, small voice.

We must try to smell more – in the fragrance of His presence.

We must try to taste more of God’s goodness in our everyday circumstances.

We must try to feel more of the wonder.

And what will be the result?

Out of the glorious riches of all these things, “we may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God” (Ephesians 3:19). God wants to fill us with His attributes:

His love—everlasting, mindful of our needs, caring.

His wisdom—truthful, trustworthy, impartial.

His holiness—pure, separate from all else, beautiful.

His righteousness—promise-keeping, miracle-working, faithful.

His power—creative, sovereign, protective.

Think of it. The King of the universe wants us to fully enjoy all that He is, all that He has to offer.

Oh, how I want to be a person on which nothing of the King is lost.

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