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Posts Tagged ‘Fourth of July’

 

Some historians would have us believe most of our founding fathers were Deists, not Christians—that they believed in a distant God who created the universe but who does not intervene in human events.

Those historians are choosing to ignore the many sources that would indicate otherwise.

In honor of those who signed the Declaration of Independence 243 years ago today, and sacrificed much for our freedom, I present the following proofs of Christian faith. (This post is long; you have my permission to skim read!):

 

John Adams

  1. In a letter to Thomas Jefferson on June 28, 1813 John Adams wrote:

“The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.”

 

Samuel Adams

  1. In his Last Will and Testament, attested December 9, 1790, Samuel Adams wrote:

“I…[rely] upon the merits of Jesus Christ for a pardon of all my sins.”

 

 

  1. In his Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 17, 1792, Josiah Bartlett called on the people of New Hampshire…

. . . “to confess before God their aggravated transgressions and to implore His pardon and forgiveness through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ . . . [t]hat the knowledge of the Gospel of Jesus Christ may be made known to all nations, pure and undefiled religion universally prevail, and the earth be fill with the glory of the Lord.”

 

Charles Carroll

  1. In a letter written to Charles W. Wharton, Esq. on September 27, 1825, Charles Carroll wrote:

“On the mercy of my Redeemer I rely for salvation and on His merits; not on the works I have done in obedience to His precepts.

 

Elbridge Gerry

  1. In his Proclamation for a Day of Thanksgiving and Praise on October 24, 1810, Elbridge Gerry called on the State of Massachusetts to pray that…

…”with one heart and voice we may prostrate ourselves at the throne of heavenly grace and present to our Great Benefactor sincere and unfeigned thanks for His infinite goodness and mercy towards us from our birth to the present moment for having above all things illuminated us by the Gospel of Jesus Christ, presenting to our view the happy prospect of a blessed immortality.”

 

John Hancock

  1. In his Proclamation for a Day of Public Thanksgiving in 1791, John Hancock called on the entire state to pray…

…“that universal happiness may be established in the world [and] that all may bow to the scepter of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the whole earth be filled with His glory.”

 

John Hart

  1. In his last will and testament, John Hart wrote:

“Thanks be given unto Almighty God therefore, and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die and after that the judgment [Hebrews 9:27]…principally I give and recommend my soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it and my body to the earth to be buried in a decent and Christian like manner…to receive the same again at the general resurrection by the mighty power of God.”

 

Samuel Huntington

  1. In his Proclamation for a Day of Fasting, Prayer, and Humiliation on March 9, 1791, Samuel Huntington wrote:

“It becomes a people publicly to acknowledge the over-ruling hand of Divine Providence and their dependence upon the Supreme Being as their Creator and Merciful Preserver . . . and with becoming humility and sincere repentance to supplicate the pardon that we may obtain forgiveness through the merits and mediation of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.”

 

Robert Treat Paine

  1. In The Papers of Robert Treat Paine (1992), editors Stephen T. Riley and Edward W. Hanson included Paine’s Confession of Faith from 1749:

“I desire to bless and praise the name of God most high for appointing me my birth in a land of Gospel Light where the glorious tidings of a Savior and of pardon and salvation through Him have been continually sounding in mine ears.”

 

 

Benjamin Rush

  1. In his autobiography, Benjamin Rush wrote:

“The Gospel of Jesus Christ prescribes the wisest rules for just conduct in every situation of life. Happy they who are enabled to obey them in all situations! . . . My only hope of salvation is in the infinite transcendent love of God manifested to the world by the death of His Son upon the Cross. Nothing but His blood will wash away my sins [Acts 22:16]. I rely exclusively upon it. Come, Lord Jesus! Come quickly! [Revelation 22:20].”

 

Roger Sherman

  1. In correspondence to Samuel Hopkins in October of 1790 (as cited in Correspondence between Roger Sherman and Samuel Hopkins by Charles Hamilton, 1889, p. 26) Roger Sherman wrote:

“True Christians are assured that no temptation (or trial) shall happen to them but what they shall be enabled to bear; and that the grace of Christ shall be sufficient for them.”

 

James Wilson

  1. From The Works of the Honorable James Wilson, edited by Bird Wilson, 1804, James Wilson wrote:

“Our all-gracious Creator, Preserver, and Ruler has been pleased to discover and enforce His laws by a revelation given to us immediately and directly from Himself. This revelation is contained in the Holy Scriptures.”

 

John Witherspoon

  1. In a sermon titled, “The Absolute Necessity of Salvation Through Christ (January 2, 1758) John Witherspoon wrote:

“I shall now conclude my discourse by preaching this Savior to all who hear me, and entreating you in the most earnest manner to believe in Jesus Christ; for “there is no salvation in any other” [Acts 4:12].”

____________________

 

These thirteen signers of the Declaration were obviously committed to Christian principles, based on their faith in a participatory God, who provides salvation to all who ask through his Son, Jesus.

Given more time and access to more resources, we’d surely find additional proofs for the Christian faith of other signers. It is verifiable that all of them were members of churches, many contributing significantly to their congregations with monetary support and service.

Would Deists consider it important to be contributing members of Christian churches?

We know this too: In the last paragraph of the Declaration of Independence, the signers, “with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence,” pledged to each other their lives, fortunes, and sacred honor.

I have to ask: Would the majority–if Deists–vote to include such a statement?

Seems more than unlikely.

 

Sources:

  1. The Founders’ Bible, Shiloh Road Publishers, 2012
  2. https://wallbuilders.com/founding-fathers-jesus-christianity-bible/
  3. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2546951/posts
  4. www.libertyunderfire.org

 

Art credits:  http://www.wikipedia.org; wikimedia.com (3); wikimedia.org; wikimedia.com; wikimedia.org (2); wikimedia.com; wikimedia.org (4); http://www.flickr.com.

 

 

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picnic-table

During my growing up years, the Fourth of July was usually celebrated at an extended-family picnic, attended by aunts, uncles, and lots of cousins. At least two tables were required for the hamburgers, hot dogs, numerous side dishes, homemade lemonade, watermelon, and Grandma’s pies and cookies.

But the highlight of the celebration didn’t happen until dark: sparklers and fireworks. What a delightful wonder to stare into a sizzling starburst and spin circles and figure-eights with a thread of light.

And then, after much painful waiting, the real show would begin. Fireworks.

A soft phoom alerted us to each explosion of color.

My favorite was a yellow-orange burst that would remain brilliant for several moments, as each spark gracefully drifted downward. The effect resembled a mammoth weeping willow tree, lit from within.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

I wonder, how did the custom of fireworks become a tradition for Independence Day?

Here is what I discovered.

It began with founding father, John Adams, in a letter to his wife, on July 3, 1776. Just the day before, fifty-six patriots had signed the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Adams thought that would be the day the new nation would celebrate. Instead, it would be the day after, July 4, when the final wording of the Declaration was approved.

trumbull-large1

Following, in bold print, is an excerpt of Mr. Adams’ letter to Abigail. The inserted comments are my own thoughts.

“The second day of July 1776 will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival.”

John Adams correctly predicted the importance of this event to Americans. The first great anniversary festivals occurred the next year in Philadelphia and Boston. Such commemoration caught on quickly throughout the thirteen colonies.

435_colonialfourth

“It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty.” 

Now that would be a worthy addition to our Fourth of July gatherings. Solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty might include prayers of thanksgiving and praise for our great nation, then asking God for his continued guidance and blessing upon America.

“It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever.”

DCParade1Edit

That word, solemnized, caught my attention. It means, “to celebrate or observe with formal ceremonies or rites.” Although Mr. Adams and other patriots would no doubt approve of family picnics and parties with friends, our choices of activities ought to be respectful of the Declaration and the lives lost to achieve and uphold our independence.

“You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure that it will cost to maintain this Declaration and support and defend these States.”

Again, John Adams’ words were prophetic. Eight long years of toil, from 1775 to 1783, were required for the colonists to achieve freedom from Britain. The blood of 25,000 patriots paid for that freedom and the treasure of 400 million dollars.

Pyle-Painting

Of those who signed the Declaration, nine died in the conflict, five were captured and treated brutally, several lost family members, twelve had their homes completely burned, and seventeen lost everything they owned.

“Yet through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory.”

Even with his vision of ravishing light and glory, Mr. Adams could not have imagined the growth of prosperity in America. No country on earth has enjoyed such rich and varied resources, provided such strong influence in the world, and so generously offered aid across the globe when needed.

1_aerial_farmscape

Then again, perhaps God did give Mr. Adams a glimpse into the future, when he wrote: 

“I can see that the end is worth more than all the means; that posterity will triumph in that day’s transaction, even though we [may regret] it, which I trust in God we shall not.”

Posterity has indeed triumphed, and John Adams was blessed to witness firsthand the beginnings of that triumph, as the thirteen colonies became a nation.  He helped negotiate the Peace of Paris, which ended the Revolutionary War. He served as vice-president under Washington, and became the second U. S. president in 1796.  Before his death on July 4, 1824, he witnessed the Louisiana Purchase and the annexation of eleven more states.

United_States_1805-07-1809

  John Adams recognized that the principles which resulted in such triumph would never change:

“The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow what I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.”*

 Indeed. A republic such as ours cannot survive unless its citizens live by certain principles, including integrity, compassion, and personal responsibility. Such Christian principles cannot be legislated; they must come from the heart.

The ravishing light and glory John Adams declared for our nation can be achieved and maintained no other way.

God help us.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *    *     *

*This last excerpt from a letter to Thomas Jefferson, June 28, 1813.

(Art & photo credits: http://www.dianacarbonell.com; http://www.pinterest.com; http://www.ushistory.org; http://www.mentalfloss.com; http://www.theepochtimes.com; http://www.groundreport.com; http://www.discovernewengland.org; http://www.wikipedia.org.)

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