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Posts Tagged ‘Lamentations 3:25’

 

I read the poster, then checked my watch—again. It was time to notify.

“Excuse me, but my appointment with Dr. D. was at 10:30 and it is now 11:15.” I spoke in even tones that belied my frustration.

The receptionist referred to the schedule on her computer. “Thank you,” she responded pleasantly. “I’ll check to see what the problem is.”

Returning to my seat, I expected to be called shortly, but it still took ten to fifteen minutes. Another annoyance: no one ever explained the delay or apologized.

 

 

No doubt you’ve endured similar experiences. Waiting nearly always creates nuisance no matter how many magazines they provide. Who hasn’t been stuck in the waiting areas of car repair shops, office buildings, and airports—when we’ve places to go and things to do?

But those aren’t the only forced pauses we face. At one time or another all of us spend time in the waiting room of life—as we anticipate achieving a long-term goal, receiving that long-awaited email or phone call, or seeing an ongoing prayer finally answered.

How are we supposed to handle the interminable pauses in life?

The following truths promise to ease our frustration and offer hope.

 

 

In God’s view, to wait is not to waste.

There is always purpose in God’s delays. King David wrote, “A person’s steps are directed by the Lord” (Psalm 37:23 GNT). Next to this verse in the margin of his Bible, George Mueller wrote: “And the stops too” (1).

Just what might God be doing during the stops? He often uses wait time to work on our character, transforming pride into humility, doubt into faith, weakness into strength, and impatience into serenity.

 

A time of waiting provides a time for discovery.

As we turn attentive hearts toward gratitude for what is, praise for who God is, and satisfaction in serving him now wherever he has placed us, we’ll discover contentement.  With Paul we’ll be able to say:

 

 

“The heart is rich when it is content, and it is content when its desires are set upon God,” wrote Miguel of Ecuador (2).

On the other hand, a heart cannot be content if set primarily upon an attainment in the future.

 

Waiting is part of the wonder to come.

It’s a basic principle of investment: the longer we wait, the greater our return. Delay enhances delight.

And one day we’ll finally receive the explanation for the pauses in our lives. No doubt our eyes will widen in wonder to see all that God accomplished when in our view, progress stood still.

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

 

I thank you, Heavenly Father, that we can trust you during wait times.

You know the perfect sequence and timetable for events to unfold; we do not. You see the whole picture—the lives of others who will be impacted during this wait time; we cannot.

So may we rest on what we do know: You are a God of goodness, faithfulness, and wisdom. The one who trusts in you, whose confidence is in you, is blessed.

  

(Psalm 130:5; Psalm 139:16; 1 Thessalonians 5:24;

Psalm 100:5; Romans 11:33; Jeremiah 17:7)

 

Notes:

  1. George Müller (1805-1898) founded schools and orphanages in Bristol, England, in the early 1800s, providing care for thousands of children.  His testimony of great faith included numerous miracles of provision for the orphans under his care.
  2. Miguel of Ecuador (1854-1910)–teacher and author

 

Photo credits:  http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.canva.com (3).

 

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God, Our Promise Maker

 

 

Tucked here and there throughout scripture are more than 2,300 promises that God has made to his people. And he is committed to keeping them all (Psalm 145:13b)—how and when he deems best.

To be honest, sometimes his methods and timing don’t make sense to me. I have to remind myself that finite minds can’t expect to understand the all-knowing, far-reaching work of a righteous God (Romans 11:33-36, 2 Samuel 22:31). He also works outside the limitations of time, in the realm of eternity.  That means some of God’s promises may not be realized in my lifetime.

However, I can be confident of this: He has the future perfectly planned out, to accomplish the highest good (Proverbs 16:4a). There is no stopping the perfectly wise, precisely timed will of God. And his promises are the guarantee of those flawless plans.

 

 

Consider:

  • God never lies or even changes his mind (Numbers 23:19). Every scripture promise is founded on truth.
  • He is all-powerful (Jeremiah 32:17). No promise is beyond his capability to keep.
  • God is all-wise (Romans 11:33). He does not make foolish promises for things that would be to our detriment.
  • God is gracious and compassionate, loving and good to his people (Psalm 103:8, 86:5). Out of such benevolence, he will keep his word.

Just by reviewing such attributes of our Heavenly Father, we can fuel of our faith. And the more we know him, the more we will trust him and his promises.

 

 

We, the Promise-Takers

Our part is to take God’s promises to heart.

 

“The sacred promises, though in themselves most sure and precious,

are of no avail for the comfort and sustenance of the soul

unless you grasp them by faith, plead them by prayer,

expect them by hope, and receive them by gratitude.”

—Charles Spurgeon

 

In light of Dr. Spurgeon’s wise advice, Promise-Takers take these specific steps, as they wait for the promises of God to be fulfilled:

  • “Fight uncertainty with certainty” (Selwyn Hughes)—frequently.

 

I know you have this situation well in hand, O God.

You WILL provide what I need;

Nothing is impossible for you.

(2 Corinthians 9:8, Matthew 19:26)

 

 

  • Express gratitude for the answer that will come in God’s good time.

 

My hope is in you—

because of who you are

and what I’ve seen you do in the past.

I will praise you now for the God-glorifying outcome

that is to come!

(Psalm 42:5, Hebrews 13:15)

 

  • Quote appropriate promises often; include them in your prayers.  For example:

 

I know you WILL instruct me and teach me

in the way I should go.

You WILL counsel me and watch over me.

(Psalm 32:8)

 

  • Be mindful of any instruction that accompanies the promise.

 

I will turn away from worry

And focus my attention on you.

Then your unfailing love will surround me

Because I am trusting in you.

(Psalm 32:10b)

 

 

Promise-Takers stand on the flawless word of their Promise-Maker (Psalm 12:6a), even when they see no sign of fulfillment–yet.

With King David they aim to stay confident:

 

 

And they wait—patiently and expectantly—knowing that:

 

 

Is there a particular promise that you are taking to heart for 2019?  Please share in the comments below!

 

(Photo credits:  http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.canva.com (3); http://www.pexels.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.flickr.com.)

 

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Hope.

Such a small word for such a big, important concept.

Multi-syllable synonyms seem to carry more clout:  expectation, assurance, confidence, and conviction offer a few.  (Thank you, Dr. Roget.)

Stir them together and we can create a definition for faith-filled hope:  the constant, confident, assured expectation that God will see us through every circumstance until we’re standing before him in heaven.  Those are words with heft that we can hang onto through dark and stormy nights.

 

 

You see, hope is much more than wishful thinking.

But sometimes it hides behind the overwhelming issues we face:  health concerns, financial problems, troubled relationships, difficult circumstances, foreboding futures.

 

 

How can we live with confident assurance that all will be well when uncertainty seems to rule the day, the week, the year?

As always, scripture offers us insight:

  • Understand that hope doesn’t come from a hidden reservoir within ourselves.  According to 1 Peter 1:3, our hope comes from God, provided for us out of his loving mercy.  It’s a living hope, breathing energy and strength into our souls.
  • Remember:  we can move forward with positive expectation because He is our all-powerful, grace-filled God—loving, kind, and wise, too.  He’s not just watching from afar; he’s an involved God, tending over us like an attentive Shepherd (Isaiah 40:11a).

 

 

  • Rest assured that our faithful God will see us through to a satisfying conclusion—either through events that unfold over time, or perhaps through an instantaneous miracle.  It may be the satisfying conclusion will not come until we cross the threshold into eternity (1 Peter 5:10).  But then, in the glorious ecstasy of that moment, our earthly trials will no longer matter (Philippians 1:21-23).
  • God’s plan is designed for our good (Jeremiah 29:11).
  • Hope involves waiting (Micah 7:7)—expectantly and patiently.

Sometime during second grade I noticed that being a teacher looked like fun.  And soon my favorite pastime became playing school with whomever I could cajole into being students.  When necessary, dolls were pressed into service.

That desire to become a teacher stayed with me all through high school and college.  Finally, after fourteen years, I was the one sitting at my own teacher’s desk, awaiting the arrival of my first students.  My hope, my confident expectation that I would one day be a teacher, had at long last become reality.  The import of the moment was not lost on me.  I had to fight back the tears.

 

 

Such euphoric joy does not happen often without waiting.  We appreciate more what we have to wait for.  And frequently, hard work is also involved.

God allows us to be part of the process, teaching us important lessons about patience and perseverance along the way.

Here’s what I need to remember:

Long-term waiting and steady hard work toward a dream makes the fulfillment all the sweeter when it finally comes.

For now, we can enjoy hopeful anticipation of a new reality that is coming, perhaps in this new year 2018—good health, financial security, improved relationships, or fulfilled dreams.  We can take comfort from the knowledge that our God, who is unlimited by the constraints of time, already resides there.  And…

 

Through the dark and stormy night

Faith beholds a feeble light

Up the blackness streaking;

Knowing God’s own time is best,

In patient hope I rest

For the full day-breaking!

– John Greenleaf Whittier

 

 

Let’s step out into each new day breaking with trust and obedience, because God is preparing us for that new reality.

And may these words ring in our ears:

 

“The Lord is good to those whose hope is in him,

to the one who seeks him.”

–Lamentations 3:25

 

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

 

What hope have you been clinging to?  Are there scriptures which contribute to your confidence and expectation?  What experiences of the past give you assurance for your hopes of the future?  Please share your insights below in the comments section!

 

(Revised and reblogged from January 31, 2013.  I do apologize for posting a reblog again.  Steve and I have been sick, catching a nasty bug on New Year’s Eve.  First I succumbed, and then he did.  A new post will be forthcoming next week!)

 

Art & photo credits:  http://www.flickr.com; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.pxhere.com; http://www.wikipedia.com; http://www.pixabay.com.

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