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Posts Tagged ‘Psalm 150:2’

In April of this year I shared an idea borrowed from blogger Michele Morin, about journaling through hymns and praise songs. Such an exercise allows us to meditate on the lyrics, discovering more meaning than when we quickly sing through the words.

In that post I shared from my thoughts on “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing.” (Here’s a link to that post, Opening Up New Spaces.)

Today, let’s look more closely at another hymn rich with implications, “Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise.”

If you don’t know this hymn, you can listen to a contemporary version here,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S97XYCkJhY, then soak with me in the first verse:

“Immortal, invisible, God only wise”

I praise You, O God, for your immortality. There is much comfort in the fact that you–in all your sovereignty, power, and wisdom–have always existed and always will.

I praise You for your invisibility, which allows you to reside within the spirits of all your children. We marvel at the wonder of such a phenomenon–such a privilege–to enjoy intimacy with you, the King of the universe!

I praise you for your incomparable wisdom. Nothing is ever a mystery to you. You’re never puzzled, confused, or uncertain.[1] You always know the best course of action that will best serve everyone involved—even those who are part of the ripple effect, perhaps years later.

How amazing that you make your wisdom available to us–including an ordinary person like me.[2]

“In light inaccessible hid from our eyes”

You are light.  Your radiance is like sunlight, and rays flash from your hands! No one can physically look upon such brilliance.

But your light also symbolizes the purity of your character. Just as sunlight brightens our world, your multi-beamed goodness brightens my soul with grace, strength, blessings, and more.

You also illuminate truth in my life, through the light of your Word. And by the power of your Spirit I can walk daily in the guiding, cheering light of your presence.[3] 

“Most blessed, most glorious, the Ancient of Days”

I praise You that you are most blessed. That is, you are fully satisfied within yourself. (Of course this is true–you’re perfect!)

You’re also most blessed because of your holiness–transcendent and “totally other” from anything else in the universe.

In addition, you’re “most glorious.” Your breath-taking attributes astound us, including your:

  • omnipotence, omniscience, and omnipresence
  • infinity, changelessness, and self-sufficiency
  • faithfulness, goodness, and justice
  • mercy, grace, and love
  • holiness, righteousness, and immanence

I praise you for demonstrating all these traits with acts of power. You perform wonders that cannot be fathomed, and miracles that cannot be counted![4]

Our family has witnessed numerous wonders and miracles. “We are filled with the good things of your house” (Psalm 65:46), many of which are recorded in my God -Is-Faithful journal.

I also praise you for being our Ancient of Days—a name that speaks of your regality, endurance, and sound judgment.  You have reigned in supremacy through eons past and will continue to reign into eternity yet to come.

Again, what sweet comfort and joyful wonder to contemplate that you, such an incredible God, are with me and within me, wielding your attributes for my benefit.

“Almighty, victorious—Thy great name we praise.”

King David wrote, “How majestic is your name in all the earth” (Psalm 8:1)! Perhaps he had in mind the multiplicity of your names, each one highlighting different facets of your character. You are:

  • Elohim, God of supreme power and might
  • El Roi, the God Who Sees, who watches over all
  • Jehovah Jireh, our God who provides
  • Jehovah Rapha, our God who heals
  • Yaweh Shalom, our God of peace

And that’s just a few out of many. I thank you that as each one reveals more truth about you, we grow to know you better. I also praise you for the hope and encouragement we find in your glorious names.

You, O God, are most worthy of praise because of your infinite excellencies. I praise you for your greatness–beyond human comprehension!


[1] Lloyd Stilley, https://www.lifeway.com/en/articles/sermon-wisdom-god-romans-16-1-corinthians-1

[2] James 1:5; Psalm 19:7 CEV

[3] 1 John 1:5; Habakkuk 3:4; 1 John 3:3; Psalm 12:6; 119:105; Psalm 89:15; John 8:12

[4] Psalm 150:2; Job 5:9

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The first Christmas carol ever composed rarely appears in a collection of Advent songs.  But you will find it in the Bible, Luke chapter one.  It’s Mary’s song, shared with her cousin Elizabeth soon after she arrived at the older woman’s home.

Using much scripture, Mary artfully wove this prayer-song to praise God for his work in her life and in the world-at-large, especially now that the Messiah would soon be born.

Mary’s prayer is often referred to as the Magnificat, because in a number of translations it begins, “My soul magnifies the Lord,” as if Mary is holding up a magnifying glass to God’s attributes while she draws attention to each one.

I too have seen God’s attributes at work, and have experienced countless blessings.  While contemplating Mary’s song recently, I wondered: could I compose a Magnificat? What follows is the result.

My soul proclaims your greatness, O Lord . . . (Luke 1:46 HCSB)

. . . on display in the wonders of creation, events that defy explanation, and in the transformed lives of people—including my own. 

“You are the God who performs miracles; you display your power among the peoples”[1] as needs are met, disasters avoided, and the way forward provided. You alone are omnipotent, with all resources at your disposal.

My spirit rejoices in God my Savior (v. 47 NIV).

I praise you for saving me from the consequences of my sin through the sacrifice of your Son.  Upon my last breath, you will take me to heaven to live with you forever. In that moment I’ll be healed of all ailments and released from all adversity.

Until that day, you gladly save me from worry, fear, discouragement and stress when I trust you and follow your ways. Thank you, dear Father!

You have looked [with loving care] on the humble state of your maidservant (v. 48 AMP).

By the world’s standards I’m a nobody–no wealth, no fame, no power. Little do some know my true status, the daughter of the King of the universe, and the numerous delights I enjoy as a result:

  • glorious moments in your presence
  • generous gifts not even asked for
  • friendships with your other children (augmented by your involvement and influence)
  • your frequent intervention in difficult circumstances, as only a powerful King could arrange

From one generation to another you have demonstrated your mercy (v. 50 GNT).

I think of my grandparents, each of whom you sustained and helped through difficulty.  I think of my parents who also experienced your faithfulness as they were faithful to you.

And now we can testify of your gracious kindness. You have dealt compassionately, especially in times of distress.

Your mighty power has been on display (v. 51 GWT) . . .

 . . . through healings that doctors can’t explain, needs met in miraculous ways, monetary gifts arriving just in time, and moments of desperation turned around in an instant.

“You satisfy the hungry with good things” (v. 53, HCSB). 

The list is lavishly long: your undeserved love, comforting presence, inexplicable peace, fullness of joy, heartening encouragement, fulfilling purpose, undying hope, sure promises, abundant provision, generous blessings, wise counsel, abiding strength—to mention a few! “In your giving we have a sea without a shore.”[2]

My God, the King, I exalt you for your glorious attributes,

and will praise your name forever and ever.

 Your ways are absolutely holy—no one is like you. 

You are the God who performs miracles!

Your power is on display in glorious ways all over the earth,

yet you have chosen to do great things for me and those I love.

My heart is filled with joy!

(Psalm 145:1; 77:13-14; 126:3)


[1] Psalm 77:14

[2] Herbert Lockyer, Seasons of the Lord, 255.

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Imagine tagging along with the disciples during Christ’s ministry, listening to his teaching, watching his encounters, witnessing his miracles. 

One day your group encounters two blind men along the roadside in Capernaum.  The sightless men cry out, “Have mercy on us, Son of David!” Jesus touches their eyes, and instantly the two men can see (Matthew 9:27-31). After a collective gasp, everyone bursts into cheers and joyful laughter.

On a second occasion outside the town of Bethsaida, some people bring another sightless man to Jesus.  Perhaps he’s heard what happened to the two blind men of Capernaum, because he too begs Jesus to touch him and heal his blindness.  But that’s not what Jesus does.  Instead, he spits on the man’s eyes and then puts his hands on him. 

Even a second touch is added to restore this man to full sight (Mark 8:22-26). Amidst the celebrating for this miracle you wonder, Why did Jesus spit on this man’s eyes when one touch healed the blind man in Capernaum?

On a third occasion as Jesus and your entourage leave Jericho, you encounter yet another blind man, Bartimaeus.  Will Jesus touch him and/or spit on the man’s eyes to heal him?  Neither. Jesus simply speaks to the beggar and his sight is restored (Mark 10:46-52). Your bewilderment grows deeper still.

And then while in Jerusalem, Jesus heals a fifth blind man.  By now you’ve given up trying to predict what the Master might do.  Even so you blink in surprise as Jesus spits on the ground, makes a bit of mud, spreads it on the blind man’s eyes, and instructs him to go wash in the pool of Siloam (John 9:1-9). You catch yourself before throwing your hands up in disbelief as Jesus demonstrates one more way to heal sightless eyes.

You’ve now witnessed five men healed of blindness by four different methods.  The evidence speaks for itself:   

The Son of God is unpredictable.

The Old Testament provides proof that God the Father also acts in unexpected ways.  You may remember when he:

  • Raised up two humble shepherds to positions of leadership[1]
  • Spoke to one of his prophets through a donkey[2]
  • Made the sun stand still[3]
  • Used a blind slave to kill thousands of Israel’s archenemies[4]
  • Allowed another prophet to be swallowed by a big fish[5]

Numerous other examples from scripture could be cited to prove:

Our God is unconventional.

Even today he proves his penchant for the unexpected.

A few weeks ago our daughter H., a school psychologist, relayed to us a story about a student she worked with last year. We’ll call her Emma.  After frequent interactions, H. and Emma developed an easy rapport, the girl was making good progress, and H. grew to care deeply for her.

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But this fall as school resumed, she learned Emma had moved to Florida.  Not wanting the girl to lose momentum, H. called the new school and asked to speak to the psychologist there.  She hoped to offer some helpful background about Emma and set the tone for continued progress.

Imagine her surprise when the gentleman who answered the phone turned out to be Andrew __________, a colleague who’d been part of the same master’s program as H. at Florida State University.  Out of just twelve students in that program, Andrew just happened to be the one to oversee this little girl who’d won our daughter’s heart.  And Andrew assured H. he’d take good care of Emma.

Time and again our God has proven . . .

. . . He is full of surprises.

I for one take great delight in a Heavenly Father who mystifies me by his unpredictability, wows me with his unconventionality, and takes my breath away with his surprises. 

How about you?

Please share in the comment section below an example from your own experience of “a wonder that cannot be fathomed.” Let’s . . .


[1] Moses, Exodus 3; David, 1 Samuel 16

[2] Balaam, Numbers 22

[3] Joshua 10

[4] Samson, Judges 16

[5] Jonah, Jonah 1

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This quote became the basis for a post in September 2017 titled Expect Great Things.  At the time Murray’s words were speaking new encouragement into my prayer life.  I copied the quote on a 3 x 5 and have kept it in my prayer box ever since.

Now four years later, I must confess my worship of God in his glory has become a bit stale.  I find myself using the same words to repeat such attributes as:  his wisdom to solve problems, his goodness to provide blessing, and his power to generate miracles. My loving Father deserves so much more than rote repetition.

Then a new idea occurred to me, likely inspired by the Spirit himself.  What if I devoted each day of the week to a different aspect of God’s glory?  And what if I prepared a separate page in my quiet time notebook for each attribute and began collecting appropriate scriptures, quotes, personal thoughts—different praise-starters for each day so my worship might remain fresh?

To that end, I chose the following attributes to focus on first:

  • Sunday—God’s power and greatness
  • Monday—God’s splendorous names
  • Tuesday—God’s wisdom and counsel
  • Wednesday—God’s love
  • Thursday—God’s faithfulness
  • Friday—God’s goodness
  • Saturday—God’s grace and compassion

To keep this post of reasonable length, I’ll just include what I’ve collected so far for Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday.

Sunday—God’s power and greatness

  • Scripture:  “Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness (Psalm 150:2).  What acts of God’s power and greatness have I witnessed or heard about recently?
  • Quote:  “When we are facing the impossible, we can count upon the God of the impossible” (Amy Carmichael).  Praise him for several impossibilities miraculously rendered—perhaps a need met, a problem rectified, a healing provided.  
  • Prayer starter: I praise you, O God, for the magnificence of your power—to create everything in the universe out of nothing, to keep it all functioning smoothly, to be present everywhere at the same time, to bring good out of every situation for those who love you, to change lives for the better, . . .  

Monday—God’s splendorous names and titles

Scripture: “Let the name of the Lord be praised, both now and forevermore” (Psalm 113:2).  Choose one or two to focus on each Monday.

  • Prayer starter for one name:  I praise you Jehovah-Nissi, The Lord My Banner. You are my focal point of hope and encouragement for every situation. How comforting to know that all of your attributes are always at work on behalf of your people.  I praise you for your marvelous promises of strength, provision, wisdom, and peace. . .

Tuesday—God’s wisdom and counsel

  • Scripture: “I will bless the Lord who has counseled me” (Psalm 16:7a NIV).  How has he counseled me recently as well as others?
  • Quote:  Praise God that his “infinite wisdom directs every event, brings order out of confusion, and light out of darkness, and, to those who love God, causes all things, whatever be their present aspect and apparent tendency, to work together for good”—J. L. Dagg.  Such glorious truths to hold close at heart! What else might I add?
  • Prayer Starter:  I also praise you, O God, for the gift of scripture to guide us through life with your truth and wisdom.  I praise you for your Holy Spirit who increases our understanding and enlightens our souls.  You never turn away anyone who seeks your wisdom! . . .

And what will be the result of such worship that enthusiastically affirms God’s transcendence?  Transformation—transformation of our prayers, transformation of our lives.

.

Nothing we do is more powerful

or more life-changing than praising God.

— Stormie Omartian

*from The Power of God’s Names

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