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Posts Tagged ‘Brother Lawrence’

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“That does sound wonderful,” a young mother says, “but Brother Lawrence was a monk, working in the garden or kitchen all day. He could pray as he went about his chores. I work in a noisy office and then deal with three noisy kids when I get home. How can I experience continuous communion with God?”

Her dilemma is all too familiar, even for someone like me who’s retired!

So I began a list of possibilities to help me live in more continuous communion with God. Perhaps an idea or two will appeal to you.

  1. Begin the day with God–even as I get out of bed.  “This is the day the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it,” the psalmist urged (118:24).  OK, what can I rejoice in and be grateful to God for, as I anticipate the day?

 

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  1. Wear a reminder-bracelet—even a paper one! Write a scripture on it (such as Isaiah 26:3), or an encouraging statement, such as: “He is beneath me as my foundation, He is beside me as my friend, He is within me as my life” (Barbara Johnson, Women of Faith speaker).
  1. Copy a meaningful scripture on a 3 x 5 card. Post it on the inside of a kitchen cabinet door, the visor of the car, or the inside of a closet. Move it around every few days so the element of surprise serves to grab my attention.
  1. Sing to God (while driving quiet streets or doing noisy chores!)
  1. Keep my blessings journal more faithfully. (Even though I established the habit years ago, I still allow some precious gifts to go unrecorded. More attentiveness will add more joy to my days.)
  1. Get outside. Find at least one marvelous gift in creation, and praise God for his genius.

 

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  1. Follow this advice from Barbara Johnson (mentioned above): While using a household product, see if the name or its attributes remind me of God and my relationship with him. One example: Fresh Start laundry detergent. While loading the washer I can pray, “Thank you, Father, that every day is a fresh start with you. Your mercies are new every morning.”  (Interested in more products and their implications?  Click on “A.M. Attitude Adjustment.”)
  1. Post a verse on the bathroom mirror. Work at memorizing it.
  1. Each time I sip my coffee or tea, I can also “Taste and see that the Lord is good” (Psalm 34:8) by savoring the blessings of the moment.  Thankfulness opens my heart to his presence and my mind to his thoughts.**

 

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  1. End the day with God, recalling his blessings or reciting his scripture.

 

Now if you’re like me, a bracelet on the wrist or a 3 x 5 on a cabinet door soon become such common sights, I barely notice them anymore. Perhaps if I rotate through some of the suggestions, they’ll retain their impact.

Sunday might be the day for an outdoor respite.  Monday might be Bracelet Day; Tuesday could be Taste-and-See Day.

You get the idea.

Bottom line: I want my mouth filled with God’s praise; I want to declare his splendor all day long, simply because he is worthy of praise (Psalm 71:8; 1 Chronicles 16:24-25).

But how glorious is this:  our all-gracious God chooses to bless us when we seek to bless him—blessings such as:

 

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So…

 

“…For a short time, fly from your business;

hide yourself for a moment from your turbulent thoughts.

Break off now your troublesome cares,

and think less of your laborious occupations.

Make a little time for God, and rest for a while in Him.

Enter into the chamber of your mind,

shut out everything but God

and whatever helps you to seek Him, and,

when you have shut the door, seek Him.

Speak now, O my whole heart, speak now to God:

‘I seek Thy face; Thy face, Lord, do I desire.'”

—  Anselm

(1033-1109, Archbishop of Canterbury, caring pastor, author)

 

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What strategies help you to enjoy continuous communion with God?  Please share in the Comments section below!

 

**based on a statement by Sarah Young, Jesus Calling,p. 343

 

(Art & photo credits:  www.azquotes.com; http://www.pinterest.com; http://www.guilford.ces.ncsu.edu; http://www.zazzle.co.uk; http://www.ourdailyblossom.com.)

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Years ago, I taught one year of kindergarten before “graduating” to fourth grade.  One aspect of that year proved especially delightful: the humorous things those five year-olds would say.  I started writing them down, to enjoy again in the future.  The future is now!

For example:

Alice and Lisa spent most of recess one day digging a hole in the sandbox.  “We digged so deep,” Alice said, “we could hear the people in China walking around.”

After giving instructions for an art activity, I asked if anyone had a question.  Lee raised his hand to inquire, “What’s the capital of North Dakota?”

Megan was recuperating from strep throat.  She informed me, “I could have gotten dramatic fever.”

Lauren asked me one day, “Mrs. Ruegg, what’s your last name?”

Such moments were pure fun-shine, lighting up my spirit.

Did you know scientific study is discovering that laughter provides a number of health benefits? (Just as research has proven the benefits of happiness, as we considered in the last post.)

You see, laughter enhances your intake of oxygen as you breathe more deeply.  That, in turn, positively impacts your heart, lungs, and muscles.

Laughter releases endorphins in the brain.  Endorphins are one of the brain chemicals known as neurotransmitters that send electrical signals through the nervous system.  When stress or pain occurs, endorphins are released.  They help reduce the impact of such factors on the brain.  Endorphins lead to a feeling of euphoria, and laughter is a big contributor.

Laughter also…

…reduces stress and generates a relaxed feeling.

…helps dispel depression and anxiety, thus improving our moods.

…fosters connection with other people.

Once again, secular research is proving what scripture has said all along:

 “A cheerful heart is good medicine” (Proverbs 17:22).

But there is no need to invest in joke books, watch humorous You-Tube videos, or teach kindergarten!  You’ll receive a healthy dose of cheer in these ways, too:

Possibility #1:  Spend time with positive people.

Research indicates up to 80% of our laughter is not generated by funny movies or comedians on Sirius radio. Most laughter occurs during everyday comments in everyday social situations.

Another fact proven by research:  most positive people have a sense of humor.  It would stand to reason that Christians should be the most positive people around.  Spend time with positive, Christian people and you’ll no doubt find yourself laughing frequently.

Possibility #2:  Celebrate the small joys as well as the monumental.

 

Psalm 126:1-3 relates the experience of exiles returning from captivity in Babylon to Israel.  They laughed and sang for joy, feeling as if they were living a dream.

“The Lord has done great things for us,” they cried, “and we are filled with joy” (v. 3)!

Sometimes we, too, laugh and shout spontaneously at the announcement of good news—acceptance to that university of choice, a job promotion, a new baby on the way.

But the Lord does great things for us frequently.  The more I celebrate his goodness, the more joy and laughter I’ll experience.

Just the other day, I was washing dishes (Such a boring, unpleasant chore!) when a large, black and yellow butterfly fluttered by the window.  To be honest, I didn’t laugh or sing out loud, but my heart was overjoyed just the same.  That butterfly felt like a little love-gift from God, making that moment at the sink less burdensome.

Throughout each day, we would do well to follow David’s example:  “I’m thanking you, God, from a full heart.  I’m writing the book on your wonders.  I’m whistling, laughing, and jumping for joy; I’m singing your song, High God” (Psalm 9:1-2, The Message).

 

Possibility #3:  Revel in God’s presence.

Psalm 16:11 reminds us that God fills us with joy in his presence.  Just conversing with him throughout the day can be incredibly uplifting.

Brother Lawrence, in The Practice of the Presence of God (Whitaker House, 1989), suggests that we tend to stifle joy by spending only brief moments in worship.

“If God can find a soul filled with a lively faith, he pours his grace into it in a torrent that, having found an open channel, gushes out exuberantly.”

That exuberant gushing out of God’s grace, that bubbling overflow of all his glorious riches into our lives—might it take the form of rejoicing laughter sometimes?  I think so.

Karl Barth, that great theologian of the twentieth century, might agree with me.

He said:

 “Laughter is the closest thing to the grace of God.”

(photo credits:  www.marciaballestero.com ; www.sciencemadefun.net ; www.positivemindconsulting.com ; www.sallyandsam.blogspot.comwww.powerfulintnetions.org ; www.izquotes.com

 

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