Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Delighting in God’

One of the psalmists proclaimed, “I will go to the altar of God, to God, my joy and my delight” (Psalm 43:4). The statement raises the question, How do you delight in someone who can’t be seen or touched?

Perhaps we can discover the answer by considering how we delight in the people around us. My father offers a perfect example.

First let me tell you: Dad worked miracles with his numerous tools.  He could fix or build practically anything, as well as paint and wallpaper like a pro.

We were probably among the first to have a built-in sound system.  Dad wired and hooked up a speaker in every room (each with its own on-and-off switch), so anything on the radio or hi-fi could be heard anywhere in the house. 

Dad also built custom-sized furniture:  in the living room–a bookcase (with open shelves above and enclosed shelves below) along with Mom’s music cabinet; in the kitchen—new cupboards and a storage cabinet; in Mom’s and Dad’s bedroom—a large dresser; and for my brother John and me—desks. Each project displayed his careful attention to detail.

But Dad’s admirable qualities weren’t only on display in his home improvement projects.  He demonstrated patience while teaching us how to play Muggins (an old card game), how to use his tools, and how to plant seeds.

He exemplified selflessness by taking us sledding and kite-flying in the park, swimming at the community pool, and biking around town. Dad proved his generosity by volunteering time and effort to help neighbors and fulfill various needs at church.  

When Dad said, “Who wants to pick up some lumber with me?” or “Who wants to go to the hardware store?” John and I were ready to drop whatever we were doing. 

It’s not that these were exciting activities in themselves, it was Dad who made them a special delight–conversing with us as we rode to and from, pointing out items of interest along the way, and holding our small hands in his big ones as we crossed streets.  

Now all this activity and industriousness took place decades ago of course, yet I still take pleasure in remembering his noteworthy undertakings and attributes. In fact, appreciation and admiration for him have only increased over time.  I consider myself privileged to have known Dad and spent time with him.

(Dad and me, mid-1960s)

To know our Heavenly Father we turn to the Bible, of course.  There we learn about his wonderful deeds and miracles. We see God’s glorious character traits on display, including his astounding abilities, his goodness, generosity, and love. We soon find ourselves delighting in all that he is.

We also delight in God as we spend time with him–celebrating what he’s done in our past and praising him for what he’s accomplishing today. We learn important life lessons from him.  And we consider the benefits bestowed by our Heavenly Father, his eternal commitment to us, unfailing love for us, and strength-infusing presence with us.

We find ourselves happily praising God:

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 7335.jpeg

Then we turn all these contemplations into gratitude.

The daily practice of the discipline of gratitude

is the way to daily practice the delight of God.

–Ann Voskamp*

And what will be the result of such a practice?  Pleasurable wonder, resilient faith, and serene contentment—as a start. Doesn’t that sound glorious? Especially during these turbulent times.

In addition, we’ll bring delight to him also (Psalm 147:11). Imagine that!

Perhaps we’d do well to turn Psalm 43:4 into a New Year’s resolution for 2022:

[Daily] I will go to the altar of God,

to God, my joy and my [deep] delight.

____________________

*One Thousand Gifts, 82.

Photo credits: http://www.wikimedia.org (2); http://www.pixnio.com; Henry Mensinger (my grandfather); http://www.heartlight.org (2); http://www.pixabay.com.

Read Full Post »

 

 

Wouldn’t that be nice—a deep sea of joy—for the days when the washer breaks down in the middle of a load, a tire goes flat on the way to an important meeting, and a jar of spaghetti sauce slips out of hand, splattering bright red ooze and shards of glass over much of the kitchen.

Yup. That’s what we need: a deep sea of joy. We could jump right in and be swallowed up in delightful mirth while everything else conspires to dump us into despair.

But according to that wise preacher of long ago, Charles Spurgeon, that’s exactly what we do have:

 

 

“Our God is a deep sea of joy.

My soul will dive therein

And be swallowed up

In the delights of his companionship.” *

 

Sounds wonderful, doesn’t it? Such sweet relief. But how do we do that? How do we delight in the companionship of an invisible God?

Actually, the relationships we enjoy with our (visible) loved ones give us many cues.

 

 

For example, just last weekend we enjoyed three days at Red River Gorge, Kentucky, with our older son and his family. You might recall Eric and Hilja (Hill-ya) have two little girls, ages four and four months. Needless to say our activities at the gorge were limited. No zip-lining, horseback riding, or long treks through the forest. Not this trip.

But we still took great pleasure in interesting conversations on the deck (especially in the evening after the girls were asleep), a short, scenic woodland hike, superb dinners prepared by Eric, reminiscings through some family history, frequent laughter**, and simply basking in the joy of being together.

God offers us similar joys as we delight in him:

 

  • Conversation—in the form of “simple, short prayers flowing out of the present moment” (Sarah Young, Jesus Calling, 55).

 

  • Common interests, such as impacting the lives of others–opportunities to participate side by side with God in his work (John 15:5).

 

 

  • The splendor of creation–all the more magnificent as we revel in his artistry and genius (Psalm 33:6-9).

 

  • Celebration of who our God is and what he does (Psalm 145:7, 92:4).

 

  • Humorous moments–created by God just like everything else, so that with Sarah each of us can say, “God has brought me laughter” (Genesis 21:6).

 

  • His ever-present, ever-attentive companionship–itself a source of lavish joy (Psalm 16:11).

 

 

Oh, but there are still more ways to delight in God as we…

Trust.

Consistent contentment is possible as we affirm, “He is faithful in all he does” (Psalm 33:4).

Thank.

Honoring God with our gratitude is uplifting to us and pleasing to him (Philippians 4:6-7; Psalm 69:30-31).

Praise and sing.

If God delights in us with singing (Zephaniah 3:17), how much more should we delight in him with an expressive, lyrical heart?

 

 

Charles Spurgeon was right:

 

Our God offers a deep sea of joy–

if only we dive into his delights

frequently,

all day long.

 

 

*from Morning by Morning by Charles Spurgeon, updated by Whitaker House, 1984.

 

**Maybe it was only funny to us, but I have to share what four-year old Elena said after her first fishing excursion. She’d been warned to stay out of the greenery along the side of the road in case of poison ivy. Upon returning to the cabin she announced, “I stayed out of the weeds so I won’t get poisonitis.”

 

(Art & photo credits: http://www.maxpixel.freegreatpictures.com; http://www.azquotes.com; http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.uk.pinterest.com (2); http://www.pixabay.com.)

 

Read Full Post »

(a personalized psalm)

 

d172d495b5f37d166de6debcdb2dbe48

 

“Trust in the Lord and do good;

dwell in the land and enjoy safe pasture.

–Psalm 37:3 NIV

I praise you, oh God, that you are trustworthy. Your motives are always pure, your guidance always wise, your actions always righteous. Everything you do in my life is for my good.

Now, Father, I want to do good for you. May I dedicate myself each day to fulfill the to-do list you’ve designed. Remind me that interruptions may be divine appointments, ordained by you to accomplish a specific purpose.

I praise you that I can “dwell in the land and live securely” (v. 3, HCSB). How comforting to know my dwelling place is in you (John 15:5), where I find:

  • Refuge (Psalm 46:1),
  • Good things (Psalm 65:4),
  • Rest (Psalm 91:1), and
  • Enjoyment of all your glorious attributes (Ephesians 3:17-19).

 

Psalm_374

 

Delight yourself in the Lord

And he will give you the desires of your heart.

–Psalm 37:4 NIV

 

At first glance it would appear this verse teaches that as long as I’m worshiping you, you’ll grant what I want. But that would discount your wisdom, compelling you to do only what’s good for me.

No, undergirding this verse is an important truth: the more I delight in you, the more I’ll want what you want. Your desires become my desires, as I’m influenced by your infinite wisdom.

I praise you, Father, that steadily over time you have molded my spirit to be more accepting of your delights. Jeremiah’s words are more readily becoming my prayer: “As for me, I am in your hands, do with me whatever you think is good and right” (26:14*).

I praise you, too, that when a particular delight of my heart does not come to pass, you ultimately cause it to melt away!

 

4412f3f00386088059c5a9e34aa2cb21

 

Commit your way to the Lord;

Trust in him and he will do this.”

Psalm 37:5 NIV

 

I praise you, oh God, that you provide guidance in what I should do, wisdom for how to accomplish that plan, and strength to see it to completion. I can depend upon your enablement for success in the endeavors you have ordained.

How comforting to know:

  • This is your world (Psalm 24:1). That includes the little corner where I live and work and love. I can relax, knowing that Someone much wiser and stronger is in charge.
  • You’ve already planned out the events of my life in advance (Psalm 139:16). You don’t make decisions as you go along, nor do you leave everything to chance.
  • Your plan is good (Jeremiah 29:11). No matter what happens, good will come out of it.

With your goodness that desires my highest welfare, your wisdom to plan it, and your power to achieve, I. Lack. No. Good. Thing!**

All praise to you, my loving Heavenly Father!

___________________________________________

* These words of Jeremiah were not a prayer to God, but a response to the officials of Judah who wanted the prophet sentenced to death. However, when addressed to God, they do communicate heartfelt trust and submission to Him.

** Based on a quote from A. W. Tozer: “With the goodness of God to desire our highest welfare, the wisdom of God to plan it, and the power of God to achieve it, what do we lack?”

 

(Art credit:  www.pinterest.com; http://www.holy-bible.org; http://www.indulgy.com.)

Read Full Post »

Living Our Days

Gaining a heart of wisdom

He Said What?!

I'm Patty, and my husband and I are living with our adult son who has autism and epilepsy. I love sharing lessons learned from life around me, especially life with Aaron.

Meditations of my Heart

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Linda Stoll

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Debby Thompson

Impressions Becoming Expressions

My Cammino

A Journey of Life, Home & Italy

Colleen Scheid

Writing, Acting, Living with Jesus

Walking Well With God

Impressions Becoming Expressions

Mitch Teemley

The Power of Story

Heidi Viars

Taking a closer look

(in)courage

Impressions Becoming Expressions