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Posts Tagged ‘Positive attitude’

 

“Want to take a ride?” a friend asked from astride his motorcycle.

Nineteen-year old me was hoping he’d ask. So off we went—but not before L. shared an important instruction: “When we come to corners and curves, just lean into them. Follow my lead.”

The physics of a two-wheel bike require such a response. Otherwise riders will end up at the curb or in a ditch.  But leaning into the curve feels counter-intuitive to many first-time riders.

 

 

The journey of life also presents curves to navigate: physical setbacks, emotional trauma, and problematic circumstances. At such times, some of us default to responses that do more harm than good—reactions such as self-pity, anger, despair, and fear. If not corrected, these emotions will throw us into a ditch of distress.

But just as motorcyclists learn to navigate curves in a road, we can learn to navigate curves in life.

How?

 

1. Stay aligned 

 Wheels out of alignment cause instability—especially dangerous on a tight curve.

On the road of life, we travel best when our spirits aligned—with regular times of Bible study and prayer. To the uninitiated, that may sound boring. But as the habit is established, participants begin to crave that quiet time when God speaks encouragement and instruction, and we share gratitude and concerns.

 

 

To start, you might choose an earlier bedtime and rising time. But it’s worth it. Awaiting you are wonderful things (1)!*

 

2. Lean in with positivity

Leaning into the curves with his body weight allows a cyclist to maintain balance. Leaning into the curves of life with faith and optimism keeps our spirits balanced, and out of the ditch of worry and complaint.

David of Old Testament times certainly earned the right to grumble and fret. Throughout his life he faced obstacles, enemies, and even death. But he learned to lean into such curves—with God.

One time after David was seized by his enemies, the Philistines, he wrote the following: “When I am afraid, I put my trust in you. In God, whose word I praise…What can mere mortals do to me”(2)?

 

 

How could David be so confident in the Lord? He knew God well, as protective, righteous, loyal, loving, and good (3)—among other attributes. David focused on his gracious God, not his troubling circumstances.

A steadfast, positive attitude begins with faith in God.

 

3. Remember the curves of the past

Once a novice cyclist has maneuvered a tight curve, the next one is a bit easier, and the next easier yet. Soon she sails around those bends with confidence, based on her experience.

The psalmists allowed experience to provide confidence on the twisting road of life. They remembered the Lord’s wonderful deeds and miracles, his acts of power and surpassing greatness (4).

 

 

And though God certainly deserves every breath of praise we offer, there is benefit for us in the remembering also. Meditation on all his kind deeds of the past sets a tone of confidence for the curves ahead—confidence in God (5).

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Every day we travel the road of life into the unknown. But with our spirits aligned with God’s Spirit, a positive attitude grounded on faith, and confidence in God based on his flawless record, the unknown does not have to be a source of fear.

It can be an open road of sublime adventure.

 

 

*However! If you are parenting a newborn and/or little folks, caring for an elderly family member, etc.—if exhaustion is your constant companion and time to just breathe is in short supply—be kind to yourself. Listen to a Bible-centered podcast while folding laundry; pray while loading the dishwasher. God will smile with pleasure at any effort to connect with him. And in-depth Bible study can become a priority for the next stage of life.

 

Notes:

  1. Psalm 119:18
  2. 1 Samuel 21:10-15; Psalm 56:3-4
  3. Psalm 5:11; 7:17; 9:10; 12:5; 25:8
  4. Psalm 9:1; 105:5a; 150:2
  5. Isaiah 63:7; Psalm 103:2 BSB

 

Photo credits:  http://www.wallpaperflare.com; http://www.wikimedia.org; http://www.canva.com; http://www.dailyverses.net; http://www.uihere.com; http://www.wallpaperflare.com.

 

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And just what might that decision be?

A. Your food choices to stay healthy and energized?

B. The tasks you’ll complete to use your time wisely?

C. The attitudes you’ll adopt to influence your emotions?

Author/pastor Charles Swindoll chose C: “I believe the single most significant decision I can make on a day-to-day basis is my choice of attitude” (1).

Now why would that be? “Attitude is that ‘single string’ that keeps me going or cripples my progress,” he added.

Zig Ziglar explained the impact of attitude this way:

 

 

Science actually supports such statements.

According to an article in the British Medical Journal, “There is not a tissue or an organ in the body that is not influenced by the attitude of the mind and spirit” (2).

So the question becomes, how do we foster a positive attitude when circumstances conspire against us, or our days are a treadmill of monotonous routine, or we’re just glass-half-empty-kind-of-people by genetics?

The fact is, it’s still a matter of choice. And that choice alone wields great effect because:

“The inward impacts the outward” (3).

This principle is even evident in nature. Did you know that the color of silk can be altered depending on what is fed to the silkworms? Red dye in their food results in pink silk. Even the worms turn pink.

 

 

What we feed our minds and spirits colors our attitudes. We can choose to feast on the delights of God’s grace—his love, provision, promises, and blessings—or we can gorge ourselves on pig slop—disappointments, hurts, injustice, and the failures of others.

 

 

The Apostle Paul provided the perfect example while imprisoned in Rome. He never referred to himself as prisoner of Festus or Caesar or a victim of the Sanhedrin’s unjust treatment. He called himself a prisoner of the Lord (Ephesians 4:1), and saw his detainment as helping to spread the good news about Jesus (Philippians 1:12).

Paul also told his readers to pattern their lives after his (3:17). Years ago I wrote Wow! next to that verse in my Bible. Such a claim. But the book of Acts provides the evidence of his selflessness, integrity, and passion for Christ.

So when he wrote to the Philippian Christians from prison to rejoice in the Lord always (4:4), we can be sure he was choosing the same habit. When he recommended they focus on what’s excellent and praiseworthy (4:8), it’s a given that’s what he was doing too.

 

 

And now neuroscience has proven what God inspired Paul to write centuries ago: think positive thoughts and the brain will produce serotonin, which creates a sense of well being and helps the brain function at is best.

Think on negative thoughts and the brain produces cortisol, diminishing brain function and even causing depression (4).

 

https://www.azquotes.com/quote/662828

 

But controlling our thoughts is not easy.  Here are several strategies I’ve found to be helpful:

 

1. Keep in God’s Word.

We’ve considered this important step before (5); it’s number one for a reason.

 

2. Keep coming back to the center.

Ever play tennis or watch it on TV? After every shot a player returns to the center of the court, so he’s not caught too far afield when the ball comes back. When you find your thoughts crouched in a back corner, come back to the Center: Jesus. Keep your mind happily occupied on all the ways He is excellent and praiseworthy.

 

 

3.  Keep a record.

We can train ourselves to see God all around us as we keep a journal of God’s faithfulness. I began mine in 1983, in response to a Bible study (6), and now there are over 1300 entries. Just the weight of that notebook encourages my spirit.

How about a gratitude journal, to record at least one thing every day for which you’re thankful? I didn’t start that one until three years ago. It’s a delightful exercise to review God’s gifts of the day and choose one to highlight (7). It’s also fun—and spirit lifting—to look back and remember previous gifts.

 

 

Slowly but surely, the most amazing thing happens. Our joy begins to expand and we start to become transformed into our best selves—with an increased ability to live freely and enjoy God’s presence—just by choosing a better attitude through the way we think (Romans 12:2 NLT).

 

 

Notes:

  1. Strengthening Your Grip, p. 207
  2. Quoted by Selwyn Hughes in Every Day Light, p. 132.
  3. Charles Spurgeon, Morning by Morning, p. 335.
  4. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/prime-your-gray-cells/201108/happy-brain-happy-life
  5. https://nancyaruegg.com/2018/08/23/perfect-trouble/
  6. See  https://nancyaruegg.com/2012/11/12/proving-gods-presence/   for the full story.
  7. The post that started my gratitude journal: https://nancyaruegg.com/2017/03/30/eating-live-frogs-and-other-blessings/

 

Art & photo credits:  http://www.publicdomainpictures.net; http://www.canva.com; http://www.wallpaperflare.com; http://www.pixabay.com; http://www.heartlight.org; http://www.azquotes.com; http://www.canva.com; http://www.pickpik.com; http://www.heartlight.org.

 

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The first time I saw the above painting by Richard Schem, Times Square in New York City came to mind. If you’ve ever stood at the intersection of Broadway and Seventh Avenue at night, you too may have been overwhelmed by the cacophony of color produced by thousands of neon lights.

But Richard’s painting is titled, “See the World.” That provides a very different perspective.  Now I see the colors of the sea, the brilliant hues of silken saris from India, the verdant hillsides of Ireland, the rich crimson of Chinese lacquer, the terracotta and ochre tones of the Grand Canyon.

 

 

In one painting, he’s captured the glory of color that pervades much of our world.

Of course, Richard Schem isn’t the only artist who sees the world with fresh perspective and provides a delicious moment of discovery for those who pause long enough to experience a work of art, not just view it.

I wonder what would happen if we became artists of our days—pausing long enough to find fresh perspective now and then? Might we make a delicious discovery or two? Might our days explode with colorful moments, like Richard Schem’s canvas?

If that sounds enticing, the next question would be: How do we become artists of the everyday? I’m thinking the following strategies might provide a good place to start.

 

1. Paint the day with positivity.

 

Why let the drab colors of disappointment, difficulty, and frustration shroud the day when we can choose the cheerful hues of optimism, opportunity, and blessing?

 

 

“A joyful heart makes a face cheerful.”

–Proverbs 15:13a

 

Just this morning (It’s Monday as I begin to draft), Steve and I had to go to the hospital for his weekly blood draw. Unfortunately, Mother Nature played an April Fool’s joke during the night: the SUV was covered in frost. Not being quite tall enough for the job, I attacked the ice on the windshield with some difficulty, and was soon huffing and puffing.**

Well, at least this is good exercise, I thought. And listen to the birds, happily trilling and chirping, not the least bit deterred by the chill this morning. My frustration began to subside.

 

2. Weave gratitude from morning till night.

 

(This photo taken last September)

 

Recent threads in my gratitude tapestry include: hot coffee in a thermal mug, sunshine streaming in the windows, a trio of deer feasting on the backyard hillside, candle-lighting time each evening, and a delightful book intertwining mystery and humor.

God’s goodness comes in many colors and textures.

 

3. Mold moments into sanctuaries of joyful worship.

 

 Instead of just waiting for joy to find us, we can create it. Here are a few possibilities:

 

 

  • Celebrate the prize of a smile from each person you meet—especially if you’re the one to smile and say hello first.

 

  • Savor virtual snapshots of delightful observations: a squirrel perched at the very tip of a branch, feather duster clouds sweeping the sky, the dimples on the back of a small child’s hand.

 

  • Find richness in the commonplace: the miracle of crocus blooming through the snow, fire flames leaping on the hearth (never the same way twice), and raindrop jewels glistening on the foliage.

 

 

“For you, O Lord,

have made me glad by your work;

at the works of your hands

I sing for joy.”

–Psalm 92:4 ESV

 

Design to bless others.

Becoming artists of the everyday for our own hearts’ sake is certainly beneficial, but inspiring others to connect with the Master Artist as the result of our optimism, gratitude, and good cheer? Well, that just multiplies the blessing.

How have you painted your day with positivity, woven gratitude into the hours, or molded moments into sanctuaries of joy? Share with us in the Comment section below!

 

______________________________

 

*A phrase borrowed from Run with the Horses by Eugene Peterson.

**My thoughtful husband usually takes care of this chore, but he’s recovering from a subdural hematoma as many of you know. Such exertions as frost removal are not allowed for at least three months.

Art & photo credits:  http://www.horchow.com (Richard Schem); http://www.wikimedia.com; http://www.pexels.com; Nancy Ruegg; http://www.flickr.com; Nancy Ruegg.

 

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